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Full text of "REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF EDUCATION, ONTARIO, 1906"

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University of Guelph, University of Windsor, York University and University of Toronto Libraries 



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HON. R. A. PYNE, M.D., LL.D. 
Minister of Education, Ontario. 






REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR 



1906 



PART I 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 






TORONTO : 
Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1907 



WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, Limited, Printers, 
TORONTO. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PART I. 

PAGE 

OBSERVATIONS OF THE MINISTER 

Rural Schools i 

The Advisory Council ii 

Changes in the Staff iv 

The University Act iv 

The Cost of Text Books v 

Training of the Blind and Deaf y 

Conference of District Inspectors vi 

Statistics of Education vi 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS: 

I . — Elementary Schools > yii 

II. — Secondary Schools vii i 

[II. — General: Elementary and Secondary Schools ix 

COMPARATIVE STATISTICS 1867-1905: 

[. — Public Schools, (including Separate Schools) : 

1. School Population, Attendance x 

2. Classification of Pupils xi 

3. Teachers' Certificates xii 

4. Salaries and Experience xiii 

5. Receipts and Expenditure xiv 

Cost per Pupil xiv 

II. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools xv 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools xv 

IV. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools : 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance xv 

Cost per Pupil xvi 

2. Classification of Pupils, etc xvi 

Occupation of Parents xvii 

V. — Departmental Examinations, etc xvii 

VI. — Teachers' Institutes xviii 

VIT. — Comparative School Statistics of Ontario and the United States xix 

APPENDICES. 

Appendix A. — Statistical Tables, 1905. 

Public Schools. 

I. — Table A. — School Population, Total and Average Attendance, etc 2 

II. — Table B. — Reading Classes — Pupils in the various branches of instruction... 6 

Til. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 12 

TV. — Table D. — School Houses, Prayers, Maps, etc 16 

V. — Table E. — Financial Statement 18 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 

I. — Table F. — Financial Statement, Teachers, Salaries 26 

II. — Table G. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, Maps, 

etc 30 

Collegiate Institutes and High Schools. 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement, Charges per year 34 

[iii] 



IV 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



PAGE. 

II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the different Schools, and in the various 

branches of instruction 40 

III. — Table K. — Miscellaneous, School Houses. Schools under United Board, Equip- 
ment, etc 52 

Protestant Separate Schools. 

Table L. — Protestant Separate Schools 58 

Miscellaneous. 

Table M. — Report on Truancy 59 

'Cable N. — Report on Kindergartens 60 

Table 0. — Report on Night Schools 60 

Table P. — General Statistical Abstract 61 

Appendix B. — Teachers' Institutes, Financial Statement, 1905 62 

Appendix C. — Inspection oe Schools. 

I. List of Inspectors, December, 1906 65 

11. Diplomas for School Premises, 1906 70 

Appendix D. — Rural Public School Libraries, 1905-6 71 

Appendix E. — Continuation Classes, 1905-6 8-3 

Appendix F. — Free Text Books in Rural Schools, 1906 96 

Appendix G. — Proceedings for the Year 1906. 

1. Regulations and Circulars 97 

Apportionment of Public and Separate School Grant, 1906 97 

Apportionment of Special Legislative Public and Separate School 

Grant, 1906 112 

Patriotic Programmes ! 133 

Changes in the Department of Education and Schools Acts...,. 136 

Accommodations and Equipment of Rural Schools ." 139 

Summer Schools for Teachers 146 

Apparatus for Physics and Chemistry 146 

Apparatus for Elementary Science 152 

Equipment for Domestic Science, Constructive Work and School 

Gardens, in Rural Schools 155 

Model Schools and Third Class Certificates 158 

Courses of Study and Examinations 158 

Senior Teachers' Examination, Special Provisions for Public School 

Teachers 159 

Courses for Commercial and Art Specialists 160 

High School Entrance Examination, 1907 164 

Prescribed Texts, Examinations, 1907 167 

County Model Schools 168 

Teaching Days, 1906 170 

Teaching Days, 1907 171 

The Advisory Council of Education 172 

The Course in Upper School Geometry, 1907 173 

The Recent Amendments to the Public Schools Act 174 

Travelling Libraries 181 

Duties of Registrar, Examiners and Associate Examiners 182 

II. Orders in Council 184 

Appendix H.— Public Libraries, Historical, Literary and Scientific Institutions, Etc 

Report of Inspector 187 

Libraries in the Province 188 

Public Libraries (not free) 193 

Public Libraries (free) 201 

Ontario Society of Artists 206 

Historical, Scientific and Literary Societies 206 

Library Conditions, etc., 214 

Ontario Library Association 214 

Travelling Libraries 221 

Carnegie Public Libraries in Ontario 222 

Public Libraries with Illustrations 226 



190(> EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



PAGE. 

Appendix I. — Report of the Librarian of tiir Education Department 319 

Appendix J. — Report of the Ontario Institution for the Education" op the Blind, 

Brantford 330 

Appendix K. — Report op the Ontario Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Belle- 
ville 411 

Appendix L. — The Lake Placid Conference on Home Economics, the Work in Ontario 472 

Appendix M.^ Digest of the School Laws of the States of the United States re- 
garding Text Books 487 

Appendix N. — Admission of Candidates to the Collegiate Enstitutes and High 

Schools, 1906 508 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR 1 906. 

PARTI 



To the Honorable Wm. Mortimer Clark, K.C., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it P lease Tour Hoxor : 

I beg to present to Your Honor the first portion of the Report of the 
Department of Education for the year 1906. 

The year that has just closed will always be noteworthy as the beginning 
of a period of reconstruction in the educational affairs of Ontario. It had 
been for some time evident that changes of a somewhat drastic character 
were needed in more than one branch of the Provincial system of education. 
Owing to various causes, some of them incident to the increase and dis- 
placement of population in certain parts of the country affecting the schools 
and the supply of teachers, others the consequence of the greater cost of pro- 
viding adequate facilities in both higher and primary education, it was 
judged well to seek from the Legislature measures to modify in several im- 
portant respects (1) the powers of administration exercised by the Department, 
(2) the basis of pecuniary support for the rural public schools, and (3) the 
system of control over the State University. There was involved in these 
proposals a considerable increase in the votes granted for purposes of educa- 
tion. It affords me great satisfaction to acknowledge the intelligence and 
generosity displayed by all parties in the Legislature in relation to these 
matters, and to record the gratifying proofs of interest and enthusiasm 
evinced by many, both within and outside the Legislature, in the reform and 
improvement of our educational system. The experience of other countries, 
with that of our own, goes to show fhat united effort is of the utmost value 
in so vital a matter as the training of the youthful population. Those who 
are charged with the duty of administering the system will fall short of what 
is required if they fail to secure the cordial support and encouragement of 
the whole community. The efforts now being made should be regarded as 
.only the beginning of a movement to raise the standard of efficiency, for 
there remains much to be done, and further advances will depend in no 
slight measure upon the cooperation afforded by the people of the Province. 
During the year a large number of school boards have given proof of this 
spirit of enterprise by their policy in respect to increasing teachers' salaries, 
the improvement of equipment, and the construction of new buildings. I 
had an opportunity, during the recess, of visiting Great Britain, and of 
making some personal inquiry into the working of certain English schools, 
and the system of text-books in vogue there, and was impressed, as anyone 
1* [i] 



ii THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



who has specially investigated the subject cannot fail to be, with the deter- 
mination shown abroad by all educational authorities to make the schools re- 
sponsive to the needs of the time and to spend lavishly if wisely in bringing 
this about. I have also had the pleasure of addressing a number of meetings in 
different parts of the Province attended by educationists, as well as others, 
for the purpose of discussing educational questions. On all these occasions 
the zeal and knowledge displayed by the local authorities were much to 
be commended, and I have little doubt, notwithstanding the onerous nature 
of the task before them, that the people of Ontario will be equal to their 
educational responsibilities as they have been equal to other important du- 
ties in times gone by. 

Eural Schools. 

That the task of meeting modern requirments in education is no light 
one cannot be denied. This is especially true of the rural schools which 
have, from one cause and another, been allowed to fall much below that stan- 
dard of. excellence which the people in the rural localities have a right to 
expect for their children. The amendments to the Public Schools Act passed 
at the last session of the Legislature were designed to meet the needs of these 
schools. The first duty was to provide larger pecuniary support. The legis- 
lative grant was increased, as well as the grants by the municipal authori- 
ties. The legislative grant for the rural schools was thus increased 
to $180,000, an amount by no means in proportion to the wealth 
and importance of a Province like Ontario, but considered to be a fair start- 
ing-point. It was designed that this larger pecuniary support should be 
devoteH, first, to the payment of higher salaries to teachers, and to provide 
improved equipment in the schools. The attainment of these objects, as a 
prime consideration in educational policy, has met with general approval. 
The salaries of teachers in rural schools had become insufficient to induce 
young men and women to enter the teaching profession and to incur 
the expense of higher professional training where the compensatory advan- 
tages were so slight. • The rapid settlement of the Western Provinces of 
Canada has also drawn away a considerable number of our experienced 
teachers. The salaries offered in the West were much in excess of the scale 
in Ontario, so that the Department of Education, in order to keep our own 
schools open, felt itself obliged to issue a greater number of temporary cer- 
tificates than concern for the welfare of the schools could justify, provided 
such a condition were to last for any length of time. The objects sought by 
the legislation of last season should, therefore, be regarded as a principle 
from which a backward step must not be taken. The best means of accom- 
plishing this desirable end are not in themselves inflexible or necessarily 
permanent. The machinery for enhancing and distributing the larger grants 
has now had a year's trial. Over the greater part of the Province it has 
been found to work well. From some quarters, however, have come protests 
that the plan devised is calculated to destroy the initiative spirit of trustee 
boards and thus eliminate one of the most valuable factors making for the 
improvement of education. To all these representations I have given, as 
it is my duty to do, the most careful consideration, and if such modifications 
of the law can be made as will provide for its smooth working, while at the 
same time safeguarding the objects in view, no objections can be raised to 
their incorporation in the Act. Hand in hand with increased compensation 
to teachers goes higher training, and for this purpose it is proposed to sub- 
stitute Normal School for Model School training. The excellent work done 
in some of the model schools is encouraging, but it is felt that to secure 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. iii 



more efficient teaching the extension and modification of Normal School 
training is in accord with what is being done in other countries and will 
meet satisfactorily the conditions in Ontario. The addition of four new Nor- 
mal Schools to the three already in existence will, it is believed, provide 
for the present the necessary number of teachers. The additional Normal 
Schools will be so situated as to serve conveniently the various parts of the 
Province, and also to provide the required practice-teaching in public schools 
of a successful character. Agreements have been made with the trustee 
boards of Hamilton, Stratford, Peterborough and North Bay for the use of 
public school classes under their respective jurisdictions. The erection of 
buildings for Normal Schools in these places will be at once proceeded 
with. The municipal authorities of Stratford, Peterborough and North Bay 
have generously presented to the Province the sites for these schools. Another 
departure in professional training which also places Ontario abreast of what is 
being done abroad, is the creation of a faculty of education in the state uni- 
versity of the Province to carry on the work hitherto conducted in the Normal 
College, but on lines more thorough and complete than any institution with- 
out the resources of a well-equipped university could be expected to develop. 
The appointment of a Professor of Education has been made by the Gover- 
nors of the University, and pending the creation by the University of model, 
high and public schools under university control, the use of city schools for 
practice and observation purposes will be sought and I trust secured. 

The Advisory Council. 

The recent choice of members to form the first elective Advisory Council 
of Education marks another step in the reorganization of the system. By 
this a body representative of the various classes of educationists has been 
called into existence'. The creation of the Advisory Council has long been 
discussed as a practical method for bringing the Minister of Education in 
close touch with the teaching profession and enabling nim, whenever he de- 
sires, to seek in a regular and systematic manner the counsel and opinions 
of the various ranks of educationists. The Council is elected triennially 
and upon it are represented the Universities, the High Schools, the public 
schools and the separate schools and the inspectors, while two of its members 
are school trustees. In creating this body, the Legislature has carefully 
guarded the responsibility of the Minister, who is not to divide or evade his 
duties to the Legislature or the public, but is to continue responsible, as 
before, for the legislation and administration pertaining to education. The 
Council will be consulted from time to time on matters concerning which I 
feel that the advice of professional educationists will be helpful to the 
public advantage. My representative upon the Council, and the medium ^f 
official communications, is the Superintendent of Education. Concerning 
this office and its present occupant a word should be said. The appointment 
of a Superintendent, authorized by the Act of last session, is in harmony 
with the principle which underlies the present reconstruction of the educa- 
tional system and is intended to afford the Department the constant assist- 
ance of professional experience and knowledge dissociated from the full 
administrative control which remains in the hands of the responsible Min- 
ister. The functions of the office of Superintendent being advisory and not 
executive, are exercised primarily with a view to the educational bearing of 
all questions submitted to h.im. The abstract merits of all educational prob- 
lems thus receive due consideration, and I am glad to have, in this im- 



iv THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



port ant work, the aid of Dr. John Seath, whose long" connection with our 
school system and whose labors in behalf of education amply qualify him 
for the position of Superintendent. His report upon the educational ques- 
tions now engaging the attention of the Department will be presented in 
due course. 

Changes in the Staff. 

There have been, during the year, a number of other changes in the 
personnel of the staff of the Department. The appointment of a Superintend- 
ent and the resignation of Mr. J. E. Hodgson, M.A., left vacant both the 
High School Inspectorships. The decision to promote continuation work called 
for the selection of an inspector to give the whole of his time and thought 
to that branch. The resignation, through ill-health, of the registrar occa- 
sioned a vacancy in that office. The Minister, therefore, finds himself sur- 
rounded by several new officials, who have been selected on the ground for 
their fitness and qualifications, and whose services he is glad to have at this 
juncture in educational affairs. For the High School inspectorships Mr. 
James E. Wetherell, B.A., Principal of the Strathroy Collegiate Institute, 
who has made his mark both in school management and in literary work, 
and Mr. H. B. Spotton, M.A., Principal of the Harbord Street Toronto Col- 
legiate Institute, whose experience as principal and as a teacher in science 
are well known, were chosen. The appointment of Mr. R. H. Cowley, B.A., 
Inspector of Public Schools in the County of Carleton, as Inspector of Con- 
tinuation Classes, was due to his special familiarity with this branch of work 
and to his record as a teacher and inspector. The Department loses an 
excellent official in the retirement of Mr. W. H. Jenkins, B.A., who has 
felt himself compelled, on account of ill-health, I regret to say, to relin- 
quish the onerous duties of a sedentary occupation. His restoration to health 
will be hailed with satisfaction by his fellow-teachers throughout the Prov- 
ince. His successor, Mr. J. A. Houston, M.A., possesses both in respect to 
scholastic training and knowledge, the qualifications required in discharging 
the duties connected with the examination branch of the Department. 

The University Act. 

The year will also be memorable for the passage of the University Act, 
based on the report of a Royal Commission appointed the previous year. 
Of this Commission Mr. Joseph W. Elavelle was chairman, among the other 
members being Mr. Goldwin Smith, Sir William Meredith, Mr. Byron E. 
Walker, Rev. Canon Cody and Rev. D. Bruce Macdonald. The report rf 
the Commission, which sat for several months and personally investigated 
the workings of the University constitutions of the United States, was accom- 
panied by a draft bill. This, with certain modifications, was accepted as 
the basis of the legislation and was adopted unanimously by the Legislature. 
It vested the supreme control of the State University in a board of twenty 
governors nominated by the Crown, assigned to the institution an annual 
income equal to half the revenue received by the Province from succession 
dues, increased the powers of the President of the University, who becomes 
ex-officio a member of the governing board, and made such changes in the 
executive machinery as will, it is believed, greatly conduce to the welfare 
and efficiency of this great state institution. The measure also transferred 
the control of the School of Practical Science from the Department of Edu- 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 






cation to the Board of Governors of the University, thus severing a connec- 
tion which nad lasted for more than thirty years. In heartily approving of 
this important change I did so with the conviction that the incorporation 
of the School in the University, of which it is now the Faculty 
of Applied Science, would greatly conduce to the welfare of both 
institutions. As a sharer in the enhanced income conferred upon the Uni- 
versity by the Legislature, the School will be better able to perform those 
services for technical education now so earnestly desired by the people of 
Ontario. In the recommendations of the Commission on this head I concur, 
since the development of technical instruction in the schools of the Province 
calls for an effort not hitherto put forth if we are to keep pace, as an indus- 
trial community, with the training supplied to tne youths of other countries. 

The Cost of Text Books. 

The appointment of a Commission consisting of Mr. T. W. Crothers, 
of St. Thomas, and Mr. John A. Cooper, of Toronto/ to enquire into the 
prices of school text-books, touches a subject of much concern to the parents 
and taxpayers of the Province. The Commission has held open sittings, and 
with some of the evidence collected the public are already familiar through 
the reports in the press. The whole of the testimony was carefully recorded 
by stenographic reporters and constitutes a valuable body of information 
respecting tlie best methods of publishing text-books. The report of the 
Commission is being completed and will be presented to Your Honor 
at an early date. Action consistent with the information thus gained will 
be taken with a view to relieving the parent of unnecessarily high prices 
for text-books and with the aim of providing better books. 

Training of the Blind and Deaf. 

The two institutions under the control of this Department, namely the 
Ontario Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, at Belleville, and the Institution 
for the Education of the Blind, at Brantford, have had a prosperous year. 
The reports of the Principals of the two institutions are appended to this 
volume of my report. At the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb the health 
of the pupils has been good and the attendance of a larger number of new 
pupils is recorded. In the Principal's report are incorporated, from the 
writings of Dr. Love, the well-known aurist, who visited Belleville last year, 
and from other sources, some historical data respecting the progress in the 
training of deaf-mutes by reason of the scientific effort and philanthropic 
zeal shown in all civilized countries for the welfare of this class of the 
population. Mr. Mathison, who has retired from the Principalship of the 
Institute after many years of efficient service, carries with him the good will 
of all the teachers and pupils with whom he has been associated. His suc- 
cessor, Dr. C. B. Coughlin, brings to the work professional talents of a high 
order and a temperament well suited to promote the interests and happiness 
of those entrusted to his care. Mr. H. F. Gardiner, Principal of the Brant- 
ford Institution, makes a favorable report of the year's work, and presents 
an interesting account of the methods employed to train blind pupils for a 
useful place in life. A summary is also given of the proceedings of the 
Edinburgh Conference on the Blind last year at which practical addresses 
were delivered reflecting the latest views of competent authorities upon the 
instruction of the blind. 



vi THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Conference of District Inspectors. 

During the year, the conditions and requirements of the schools in the 
northern districts have been under the consideration of the Department 
The Deputy Minister and the Superintendent of Education visited one por- 
tion of New Ontario for the purpose of personally inspecting the circum- 
stances under which primary education is maintained there, and having 
reported in favor of a conference of all the district inspectors, such a confer- 
ence was held in the month of November. The educational conditions in 
Northern Ontario are exceptional. The schools in many places are con- 
ducted under difficulties owing to the nature of settlement and the scarcity 
of teachers. As there is a rapid increase of population in certain areas, 
especially along the line of the Temiskaming and Northern Ontario Rail- 
way, it is manifestly the duty of the Legislature to encourage in every way 
possible the efforts of the people in those districts to provide schools for 
their children. It may be necessary to treat the educational problem in 
all our newer districts on lines somewhat different from those found to be 
suitably adapted to older Ontario. There is already a commendable zeal 
amongst the people themselves, and the Department is ready to second their 
efforts. There are now, according to the statistics just supplied by the 
Inspectors, 826 district schools, both public and separate. Of these, 85 are 
bi-lingual schools, which are divided into 55 public schools and 30 separate 
schools. 

Statistics of Education. 

The statistical information to be found appended to this report contains 
many details which illustrate educational conditions and mark educational 
progress. It has been thought well to present certain information not embod- 
ied in previous reports; such, for example, as separate statements respecting 
rural schools as distinct from urban schools ; the qualifications of _ teachers 
in the several counties and districts ; fuller statistics relative to kindergar- 
tens ; the number of schoolrooms in each inspectorate ; and comparative 
statistics of the United States and Ontario. 

A summary of the statistics for 1905 shows that there were in Ontario 
?n that year 5,793 public schools, 428 separate schools, and 140 high schools 
and collegiate institutes. The number of pupils was, respectivelv, 397.170, 
49,324. and 28,661. The expenditures were: On public schools, $5,524,- 
102; on separate schools, $637,134: on high schools, $1,004,498. The total 
expenditures were, therefore, $7,165,734. The number of teachers in the 
three classes of schools was 10,338. The salaries paid to teachers in rural 
schools show a tendency to increase, the average salary paid to male teachers 
in those schools having risen from $385 in 1904 to $402 in 1905, and the 
average paid to female teachers from $294 in 1904 to $311 in 1905. 

R. A. Pyne, 

Education Department, Minister of Education. 

Toronto, January, 1907. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. vii 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

1. Elementary Schools. 

a. Public Schools. 

Number of Public Schools in 1905 5,793 

Increase for the year 35 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public Schools 

during the year : 397,170 

Increase for the year 356 

Average daily attendance of pupils 232,077 

Increase for the year 4,912 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance 58.43 

Increase for the year 1.18 

Number of persons employed as teachers (exclusive of Kin- 
dergarten and Night School teachers) in the Public 
Schools: men, 1,839; women, 6,840; total 8,679 

Decrease: men, 118; increase, women, 187; 

total increase 69 

Number of teachers who attended Normal School 4,442 

Decrease for the year 122 

Number of teachers with a University degree 77 

Decrease for the year 9 

Average annual salary for male teachers $514 

Increase for the year $29 

Average annual salary of female teachers $348 

Increase for the year $13 

Average experience of male teachers 9.3 years 

Average experience of female teachers 6.4 years 

Amount expended for Public School houses (sites and 

buildings) $715,761 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $3,422,324 

Amount expended for all other purposes $1,386,017 

Total amount expended on Public Schools $5,524,102 

Increase for the year $570,920 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $13.91 

Increase for the year $1.43 

b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools. 

Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1905 ... 428 

Increase for the year 9 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages 49,324 

Increase for the year .; 1,517 

Average daily attendance of pupils 32,030 

Increase for the year 2,110 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance 64.94 

Increase for the year 2.36 

Number of teachers 970 

Increase for the year 26 

Amount expended for School houses (sites and buildings) $243,366 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $246,906 

Amount expended for all other purposes $146,862 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools $637,134 

Increase for the year $130,823 



viii THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) |12.92 

Increase for the year |2.33 

c. Protestant Separate Schools. 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with 

Public Schools, a) in 1905 5 

Number of enrolled pupils 320 

Increase for the year 1 

Average daily attendance of pupils 192 

d. Kindergartens. 

Number of Kindergartens in 1905 133 

Increase for the year 4 

Number of pupils enrolled 12,480 

Increase for the year 459 

Average daily attendance of pupils 4,955 

Increase for the year 382 

Number of teachers engaged 260 

Increase for the year 5 

e. Night Schools. 

Number of Night Schools in 1905-6 ' 10 

Decrease for the year 1 

Number of pupils enrolled 620 

Decrease for the year 82 

Average daily attendance of pupils 286 

Increase for the year 13 

Number of teachers engaged 17 

Decrease for the year 2 

II. Secondary Schools.* 
a. High Schools. 

Number of High Schools (including 42 Collegiate Insti- 
tutes) in 1905 140 

Increase for the year " 2 

t Number of Teachers in High Schools 689 

Increase for the year ' 28 

Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools 28,661 

Increase for the year * 952 

Average daily attendance of pupils 17,567 

Increase for the year 837 

t Average annual salary, Principals $1,270 

Increase for the year $24 

f Average annual salary, Assistants $927 

Increase for the year $33 

t Average annual salary $997 

Increase for the year $30 

tHighest salary paid $3,000 

1 . 

*The Curriculum of Secondary Schools includes all the subjects required for 
matriculation into the University. 

tThese statistics are based on Returns to the Department, dated January, 1906. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. ix 



Amount expended for High School teachers' salaries $666,547 

Amount expended for High School houses (sites and build- 
ings) • $103,515 

Amount expended for all other High School purposes... $234,436 

Total amount expended on High Schools $1,004,498 

Increase for the year $127,411 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $35.05 

Increase for the year $3.40 

Cost per pupil (average attendance) $57. 18 

Increase for the year $4.76 



b. Continuation Classe 



s. 



Number of Continuation Classes, 1905-6 (included in Pub- 
lic and Separate Schools, I, a and b), practically do- 
ing High School work: Grade A, 88; Grade B, 41; 

Grade C, 100; Grade D, 200; total 429 

Increase for the year : Grade A, 10; Grade B, 2; 
Decrease, Grade C, 38; Grade D, 27 

Total decrease for the year 53 

Number of pupils in attendance 5,224 

Decrease for the year 125 

III. General. 
Elementary and Secondary Schools. 

Total population of the Province, 1905 *2,226,933 

Pupils enrolled in Elementary and Secondary Schools 488,255 

Increase for the year 3,202 

Average daily attendance 286,915 

Increase for the year 8,254 

Percentage of total population enrolled 21.92 

Average length of school term in days 198.46 

Average number of days attended by each pupil enrolled... 116.62 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all schools : 

1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Sites and buildings $0.97 $0.98 $1.30 $2.18 

Teachers' salaries 7.63 7.94 8.44 8.88 

All other expenses 2.80 3.14 3.32 3.62 



For all purposes $11.40 $12.06 $13.06 $14.68 

Average cost per pupil (average attendance) in all schools : 

1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 

Sites and buildings $1.70 $1.70 $2.26 $3.70 

Teachers' salaries 13.34 13.84 14.69 lo.ll 

All other expenses 4.89 5.47 5.79 6.16 

For all purposes $19.93 $21.01 $22.74 $24.97 

^Estimated. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COMPARATIVE SCHOOL STATISTICS, 1867-1905. 

I. PUBLIC SCHOOLS (INCLUDING SEPARATE SCHOOLS). 

These tables, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the R. C. Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, 
include R. C. Separate Schools. In the Statistical Tables, A, B, C, D, E, 
(Appendix A), the Separate Schools are excluded. 

1. — School Population — Attendance. 

The School population of the Province, as ascertained by the assessors, 
is given in the third column of following table : 



Year. 



1867. 
1872. 
1877. 
1882. 
1887. 
1892. 
1897. 
1902. 
1,904. 
1905 







\6 

u 

73 


o 




T3 


03 

o 

a 

T3 






g 


-*-> 




a 


C 




o 




o 


o 


<x> 


5 






T3 


73 


T3 


o 


ag 






0> 


<v 


9 











j5 


^3 




© 






P< 


o 


O 


O 


& 




SP 


O 




a 

<0 


a 


a . 

J3 OD 


8 


'o 


"o 


SO 


m 


CD 


*% 


i 


o 


o 


3 


3 


Ph 




03 

> 


QQ 


oo 


PU 


Ph 


Oh 


H 


-^ 


5—16 


447,726 




a380,511 


621,132 


401,643 


163,974 


5—16 


495,756 




a433,664 


620,998 


454,662 


188,701 


5—16 


494,804 


1,430 


488,553 


877 


490,860 


217,184 


5—16 


483,817 


1,352 


469,751 


409 


471,512 


214,176 


5—21 


611,212 


1,569 


491,242 


401 


493,212 


245,152 


5—21 


595,238 


1,636 


483,643 


391 


485,670 


253,830 


5—21 


590,055 


1,385 


480,120 


272 


482,777 


273,544 


5—21 


584,512 


1,001 


452,977 


110 


454,088 


261,480 


5—21 


576,537 


790 


443,729 


102 


444,621 


257,085 


5—21 


578,032 


814 


445,601 


79 


446,494 


264,107 



s a_- 

0) 2 o 
ecfl o 

^ cS « 

«~ O.g 

O ^t3 
O) 4> C 

Ph 



40.82 
41.50 
44.25 
45.42 
49.71 
52.26 
56.66 
57.58 
57.82 
59.15 



a 5—16. 
above table. 



b Other ages than 5 to 16. Note.— Kindergarten and Night School pupils are not included in 



It will be seen by the figures given in the above table that the School 
population and the School attendance throughout the Province have declined 
every quinquennial period from the year 1887 to 1902 and up to and includ- 
ing 1904, whilst last year a considerable increase is shown over the preceding 
year. Another feature of these statistics that shows well for these schools 
is the increase in the percentage of average to total attendance — from 57.82 
to 59.15 per cent. This increase of 1,873 in the enrollment and 7,022 in 
the average daily attendance of the Province was brought about through 
the quite large increases in the urban municipalities, as the attendance is 
still declining in the rural localities as shown in the following table. It 
will there be noticed that the rural attendance in 1904 decreased by 7,484 
from 1903, while that in 1905 decreased by only 2,475 from 1904, showing 
that the drain from the rural parts has appreciably diminished. 



Year. 



1903 
1904 
1905 



Attendance in Rural 
Schools. 



260, 617 or 57.88% of total 
253,133 or 56.93% of total 
250,658 or 56.14% of total 



Attendance in Urban 
Schools. 



189,661 or 42.12% of total 
191,488 or 43.07% of total 
195,836 or 43.86% of total 



19*6 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



XI 



2.— Classification of Pupils, 



Year. 



1867. 
1872. 

1877. 
1882. 
1887. 
1892. 
1897. 
190& 
1904. 
1905. 



i 

Pk 








1 




er. 




O t— ( 


■C 


'Q 


X 


T3 *— I 




eg 


cS 


1-9 


« 


0) 




« § 


t; 


X! 


XI 




c 


La 


4S 


i— i 


<M 


CO 


^ 


79,365 


98,184 


83,211 


68,896 


160,828 


100,245 


96,481 


67,440 


153,630 


108,678 


135,824 


72,871 


165,834 


106,229 


117,352 


71,740 


192,361 


100,533 


108,096 


81,984 


187,947 


96,074 


99,345 


88,934 


181,375 


91,330 


99,682 


89,314 


176,503 


85,732 


90,630 


83,738 


169,981 


85,229 


90,111 


83,104 


170,253 


84,289 

• 


90,170 


85,469 



o 
o 

. ^ 

O <V 



£ 



71,9871 
29,668 
19,857 
10,357 
10,238 
13,370 
21,076 
17,485 
16,196 
16,313 



231,734 
322,688 
396,006 
398,401 
466,389 
465,516 
465,525 
445,316 
439,040 
446,494 



241,501 
327,218 
402,248 
419,557 
469,445 
470,813 
471,869 
449,573 
440,314 
446,494 



5,450 
57,582 
153,036 
176,432 
395,097 
435,239 
448,444 
434,030 
426,612 
392,539 



Year. 




Music. 


Physiology and 
Hygiene. 


English History. 


Canadian History. 


c 
.2 

1 

ft 

a 

o 
O 


u 

a 
a 
t 


1867 

1872 

1877 

1882 


272,173 
327,139 
375,951 
280,517 
316,791 
334,947 
342,189 
318,755 
323,101 
326,657 


47,618 
110,083 
168,942 
158,694 
203,567 
220,941 
233,915 
268,356 
266,992 
272,725 


33,926 
71,525 
171,594 
215,343 
194,459 
215,421 
228,760 


*61,787 

47,019 

59,694 

*150,989 

94,830 

106,505 

114,398 

106,282 

115,342 

128,350 


37,339 
43,401 

Tl4, iii 
147,451 
169,627 
163,672 
171,823 
183,456 


147,412 
105,512 
226,977 
209,184 
270,856 
294,331 
3.16,787 
296,172 
305,829 
334,070 


147,412 
176,644 
226,977 
209,184 
270,856 
294,331 
316,787 
296,172 
305,829 
237,023 


1887 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1904 


1905 



The following table classifies the pupils in the various Readers in 1904 
and 1905, as to Rural and Urban Schools. 



Rural Schools. 


First 
Reader 
Part I. 


First 
Reader 
Part II. 


Second 
Reader. 


Third 
Reader. 


Fourth 
Reader. 


Fifth or 

High 

School 

Reader. 


Totals. 


1904 


60,784 
61,102 

44,456 
46,850 


36,941 
35,155 

27,800 
27,146 


47,930 
46,995 

37,299 
37,294 


50,297 
50,076 

39,814 
40,094 


47,289 
47,709 

35,815 
37,760 


9,892 
9,621 

6,304 
6,692 


253,133 
250,658 

191,488 
195,836 


1905 


Urban Schools (cities, towns, 

and incorporated villages) . 
1904 


1905 





History. 



Xll 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



3. — Teachers' Certificates. 



Year. 



1867. 
1872 
1877 
1882, 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1904 
1905 

















o 
o 

Sd cj 

S3* - 

Ph 


a3 

1 


6 

a 

ft 


SB 
£ 

QQ 
1—1 


d 


1 

in 

CO 


Other certifier 
including ol 
County Boa 
etc. 


4,890 


2,849 


2.041 


1,899 


2,454 


386 


151 


5,476 


2,626 


2,850 


1.337 


1,477 


2,084 


578 


6.468 


3,020 


3,448 


250 


1,304 


3,926 


988 


6,857 


3,062 


3,795 


246 


2,169 


3,471 


971 


7,594 


2.718 


4,876 


252 


2,553 


3,865 


924 


8,480 


2,770 


5,710 


261 


3,047 


4,299 


873 


9,128 


2,784 


6,344 


343 


3,386 


4,465 


924 


9,367 


2,294 


7,073 


608 


4,296 


3,432 


1.031 


9,554 


2,075 


7,479 


635 


4,192 


3,396 


1,331 


9.649 


1,950 


7,699 


661 


4,018 


3,248 


1,722 



T3 

CD O 



666 
828 
1,084 
1,873 
2,434 
3,038 
3,643 
4,774 
4,728 
4,620 



Note. — Kindergarten and Night School teachers are not included in above table. 

It is to be regretted that the number of men in the teaching profession 
is still decreasing, as shown in preceding table. The percentage in 1904 
was 21.72 and in 1905 it had declined to 20.21. 

Another decrease in the number of permanent certificates and a great 
increase in the number of temporary certificates, under the hading "Other 
certificates," is noticed. The increased salaries in the rural schools in ac- 
cordance with the schedule of the amended School law of last session will 
no doubt be a strong inducement to keep our teachers with permanent certi- 
ficates from going to the West, and consequently avoid the necessity of 
issuing so many temporary certificates. 

The number of the teachers and the class of the certificates in each 
county of the Province will be found on pages 12-14 of this Report. 

Seventy-seven Public School teachers held University degrees in Arts, 
a decrease of 9 from the preceding year 1904. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to Rural 
and Urban Schools, in 1904 and in 1905. 






Rural Schools, 1904 

Rural Schools, 1905 

Urban (cities, towns and in- 
corporated villages) 1904. 
Urban, 1905 



Public School Teachers. 



Total. 



5,974 
6,007 



3,580 
3,642 



Male. Female. 



1,469 
1,354 



606 
596 



4,505 
4,653 



2,974 
3,046 



1st Class. 



152 
146 



483 
515 



Certificates. 



2nd 

Class. 



1,944 
1,752 



2,248 
2,266 



3rd Class. 



3,107 
2,969 



289 
279 



Other 
Class. 



771 
1,14® 



560 

582 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xm 



4. — Teachers' Salaries and Experience. 
Teachers' Salaries. 







<v 


£ 


CC QD 


cp . 


& 


CP 

"3 


CP 


jd 




"35.2 




'5 


OS 

S a; 


« S 


35 o 

S2 


55 

&J3 


si 


g 

33 


35 


CP 


a* 

o 


as 

£ o 


Year. 


ft 

u 

la 


35 o 


33 ft 


is 


Is 


fa « 
l5 : ? 


>, QD 

35 ^2 

02 "" 


35 £ 

02 *^ 


05 £ 
02 ^ 


- ft 

fa 

35 O 


ft 

£c3 

35 C 

35""' 
QD 




02 

cp 


CP «- 
08^3 


CP *- 


ap.s 


^ fa 

8>S 


« fa 


CD *h 




*" fa, 
35 -C 


ll| 


.. l ui 




XI 


CP 35 


^ o 


J- o 


fc, o 


u o 


cp oj 


*■* y 


*h <y 


v- y JS 




M 


cp eo 


CP 33 


cp rt 


CP 35 


CP 35 


CP 03 


CP 35 Jd 


CP 05^ 






> CP 


> cp 


> u 


> V 


> cp 


!> 0) 


> ^ 


> 0) 


> <D-r 


>• cu-d 




E 


<~ 


" 


:T 


* 


<i^ 


^~ 


^^ 


-** 


«5~" 


<<<" > 




$ 


% 


$ 


$ 


1 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 




1867 


1,350 
1,000 
1,100 
1,100 
1,450 
1,500 


346 
360 
398 
415 
425 


226 

228 
264 
269 
292 


261 
305 
379 
385 
398 


189 
213 
251 

248 
271 


532 
028 
735 
742 
832 


243 

245 
307 
331 

382 


464 
507 
583 
576 
619 


240 
216 
269 
273 

289 






1872 . 






1877. . 






1882. 






1887 






1892 


421 


297 


383 


269 


894 


402 


648 


298 






1897 


1,500 
1,600 


391 
436 


294 
313 


347 
372 


254 

271 


892 
935 


425 

479 


621 
667 


306 
317 






1902 






1904 


1,600 


485 


335 


385 


294 


953 


498 


705 


341 


564 


305 


1905 


1,600 


514 


348 


402 


311 


1,003 


503 


746 


344 


592 


316 



* Incorporated villages included from 1867 to 1902, inclusive. 

Teachers' salaries, though still far too low, are on the increase, as shown 
in above table. For the first time the salaries for purely Rural Schools are 
given therein (1904 and 1905). Formerly incorporated villages were included 
with the counties. 

In Table C, pages 12-15, the salaries and experience of teachers of the 
various counties is given separately and summarized for the cities, towns 
and villages. The experience of the teachers of the Province has never been 
compiled before, and will no doubt be found interesting and suggestive. 
The following is a summary of the table above mentioned so far as it relates 
to teachers' experience : 






Teachers' Experience. 





CB +3 


CN 


■^ 


i^ 


CM 


o 




<v o 


cp cu a> — 




CP >. 


3* 


d 

33 


d 

35 
rd 


d 

35 


d 

35 


> 
o 


si 

.'H a 


d^ 

cB a 
"S-a 


3* 

cp O 




% O 








+3 




T3 


a 


ft^ 


ft 




■•*-. > '"■' 






on 




QD 


d 


« 


* o 


X m 





° a a 

i-^ 35 


02 

cp 


QD 

a? 


0J 


^ ' 


35 


Average e 
in years 
teachers. 


CP • 

CO CD 
CD S-. H 


cp £ . 

CD S? *h 




Numbe 
who 
less th 


QC 

5^ 


■+J QD 

^ fa 
O 33 

>-. 


-C cu 


** fa 

3 35 


d ^ 
,0 35 

CM >, 

I— 1 


S- 

33 
CD 


Averag 
in yea 
teache 


Averag 
in ye 
teache 


Rural schools 


384 


1,195 


1,737 


1,138 


730 


334 


176 


6.9 


4.1 


4.7 


Cities 


37 
21 
16 


64 
32 
35 


97 
127 
101 


218 
235 
120 


264 
300 
111 


360 

243 

79 


295 

169 

61 


14.8 
17.1 
13.4 


11.9 

10.1 

7.5 


12.4 


Towns 


11.3 


Villages 


9.1 






Totals, Province .... 


458 


1,326 


2,062 


1,711 


1,405 


1,016 


701 


9.3 


6.4 


7.0 


Percentages 


5.28 


15.28 


23.76 


19.71 


16.19 


11.71 


8.07 

















Note. — R, C. Separate School teachers are not included in above table. 



XIV 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Ni 



5. — Receipts and Expenditure. 



Year. 



1867 
1872 
1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1904 
1905 





Receipts. 








Expenditure. 








5 

be . 


4 S3 






' o 
o 
xi 
o 


as 
a 
p, 


S 






CO 


^ 03 


dS3 






be 






0) 


1 

be 
> 


« a 

■si 

P<2 


reserve fu 
ces and o 
es. 


a; 


3} 


2 

T2 «3 


as 

w -r 1 


2 «i 


S3 

•3 
ft 


a 


<a 
'So 


3S 




o 


0) 


3 1 
IS 


03 co" 


S o 


1 
p 


5 


J 


§ 


U 


Eh 




CO 

$ 


Hi 


QJ 


H 


u 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1 ft 


187,153 


1,151,583 


331,599 


1,670,335 


1,093,517 


149,195 


31,354 


199,123 


1,473,189 


! 67 


225,318 


1,763,492 


541,460 


2,530,270 


J, 37 1,594 


456,043 


47,799 


331,928 


2,207,364 


t 85 


251,962 


2,422,432 


730,687 


3,405,081 


2,038,099 


477,393 


47,539 


510,458 


3,073,489 


i 2(1 


265,738 


2,447,214 


757,038 


3,469,990 


2,144,449 


341,918 


15,583 


525,025 


3,026,975 


G tJ 


268,722 


3,084,352 


978,283 


4,331,357 


2,458,510 


544,520 


27,509 


711,535 


3,742,104 


7 " 7 a 


283,791 


3,300,512 


1,227,596 


4,811,899 


2,752,629 


427,321 


40.003 


833,965 


4,053,918 


8 40 


366,538 


3.361,562 


1,260,055 


4,988,155 


2,886.061 


391,689 


60,585 


877,335 


4,015,670 


8 73 


383,666 


3,959,912 


1,422,92 i 


5,766,502 


3,198.132 


432,753 


86,723 


1,107,552 


4,825.160 


10 62 


405,362 


4,464,227 


1,600,982 


6,470,571 


3,473.710 


578,656 


87,997 


1,319,130 


5,459,493 


12 27 


414,004 


4,928,790 


1,886,400 


7,229,194 


3,669,230 


949,127 


98,209 


1,434,670 


6,161,236 


U 80 



Considerable increases in Government and municipal grants and in the 
expenditure of the Public and Separate Schools are again noticed in the pre- 
ceding comparative table. The expenditure increased from $12.27 in 
1904 to 13.80 in 1905 per pupil of enrolled attendance, and from $21.23 ki 
$23.32 per pupil of average attendance as shown in the following table : 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance). 



1902. ,1903. 

Sites and buildings $0.95 $0.95 

Teachers' salaries 7.04 7.35 

All other expenses 2.63 2.97 

For all purposes $10.62 $11.27 



1904. 

$1.30 

7.81 
3.16 



1905. 

$2/15 

8.2^ 



$12.27 $13. 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance). 



1902. 

Sites and buildings $1.65 

Teachers' salaries 12.23 

All other expenses 4.57 

For all purposes $18.45 



1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


$1.65 

12.72 

5.14 


$2.25 

13.51 

5.47 


$3.63 

13.89 
5.8Q 



$19.51 $21.23 $23 



The cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1905 in the Public Schools 
alone will be found on pages 24 and 25 of this Report, and for the It. C. 
Separate Schools on pages 28 and 29. The expenditure will there be showa 
as to Rural Schools, cities, towns and villages, separately. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xv 



II. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 




Schools -Expenditure- 
Teachers. 


Number of pupils attending— Number 
of instruction. 


in the 


various branches 


Year. 


d 
a 

o. 

o 

j: 

O 

o 
o 

QQ 


u 

o 
H 


6 
fl 
'<& 

a 

0) 

p, 

X 
9 


t 

A 
o 

V 

H 


DO 


bib 

a 


6 

"5 

a 

M 

< 


>> 

a 
& 

| 

C5 


d 
o 

1 

a 

o 


u 

a 
a 
a 


si 

c 

2 
Q 


5 

3 
>, 

0£ . 

O Zi 

.2 3 

A>- 


o 

CO 

w 

A 

bib 
5 

w 


>. 

c 

"to 

B 

a 

s3 

'•B 

as 

C 

a 


1867 

1872 


161 

171 
185 
190 
229 
312 
340 
391 
419 
428 


^48,628 
68,810 
120,266 
166,739 
229,848 
326,034 
335,324 
485,503 
559,635 
693,991 


$42,719 

61,817 

114,806 

154,340 


210 
254 
334 


18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
47,807 
49,324 


10,749 
13,699 
17,932 
21,052 
27,824 
35,565 
39,724 
45,964 
47,807 
49,324 


10,559 
12,189 
17,961 
21,524 
2»,501 
25,936 
40,165 
45,964 
47,807 
49,324 


8,666 
8,011 
13,154 
13,900 
19,608 
26,299 


7,908 
11,174 
11,695 
18,678 
22.755 


5,688 
7,908 
11,174 
11,695 
18,678 
22,755 
26,071 
27,409 
31,382 
25,526 






*2,571 

*3,548 

*9,812 

♦10,124 

5,076 

6,713 

6,828 

7,544 

9,226 

10,732 




1877 








1882 


7,548 
21,818 
32.682 
36,462 
41,952 
43,866 
59,501 


2,033 
8,578 
11,056 
18,127 
14,687 
25,716 
23,909 




1887 

1892 


211,2231 491 
289,838 j 662 
302,169! 752 


7,931 
11.483 


1897 


27,471 26,071 
29,788 27,409 
32,483 31,382 
34,205 32,201 


13,134 
16,035 


1902 


435,441 
506,311 
637,134 


870 
944 
970 


1904 


16,946 


1905 


18,593 














*I 


listory. 

















Increases in the number of Schools, in the expenditure per pupil, from 
110.59 in 1904 to |12.92 in 1905, in the number of pupils attending, and in 
the various subjects, are shown in the table above in reference to the Roman 
Catholic Separate Schools of the Province. 

III. PEOTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 

The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of 
the Province: — No. 9, Cambridge; No. 6, Plantagenet North; No. 1, North 
Tilbury, L'Orignal, and Penetanguishene. 

They were attended by 320 pupils. The whole amount expended for their 
maintenance was $4,027.02. One teacher held a First Class, two teachers 
held a Second Class, four a Third Class, and one a Temporary Certificate. 

IV. COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 

The following statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 
will be found suggestive : 

1. — Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 



Year. 






d 




a 




ft 




o 




CO 








O 




O 




X, 




o 




w 


1867 


103 


1872 


104 


1877 


104 


1882 


104 


1887 


112 


1892.... 


128 


1897 


130 


1902 


134 


1904 


138 


1905 


140 



159 
239 
280 
332 
398 
522 
579 
593 
661 
689 



Receipts. 



% 

15,605 

20,270 

20,753 

29,270 

56,198 

97,273 

110,859 

105,801 

116,758 

128,886 



be 



$ 

54,562 

79,543 

78,762 

84,304 

91,977 

100,000 

101,250 

112,650 

120,799 

154,953 






Expenditure. 



$ 
139,579 
223,269 
357,521 
373,150 
529,323 
793,812 
767,487 
832,853 
960,867 
1.096,266 



94,820 
141,812 
211,607 
253,864 
327,452 
472,029 
532,837 
547,402 
620,710 
666,547 



T3 O 

c 2 
■3-" 

Ph 



$ 
*19,190 
*31,360 
*51,417 
*19,361 
*73,061 
*91,108 
*46,627 
44,246 
50,512 
103,515 



$ 
124,181 
210,005 
343,710 
343,720 
495,612 
696,114 
715,976 
769,680 
877,087 
1,004,498 









cp 




a> *e 




IP* 




u — 




£3 




*o 




oS 




ep or 




60 « 




a c 




"S =3 . 


co 


GT) J; 





erce 
ten 
anc 


Ph 


Ph 


5,696 


55 


7,968 


56 


9,229 


56 


12, 348 


53 


17,459 


59 


22,837 


60 


24,390 


61 


24,472 


58.97 


27,709 


60.38 


28,661 


61.29 



$ 

21 80 

26 36 
37 24 

27 56 

28 38 

30 48 

29 35 

31 45 
31 65 
35 05 



'Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 



XVI 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



The expenditure per pupil of enrolled .attendance in the High Schools 
increased from $31.65 in 1904 to $35.05 in 1905. The attendance is still on 
the increase, and when that at the Continuation Classes is considered, the 
increase in the number taking up secondary education is quite marked. 
6.94 per cent, of the enrolled attendance of the Province is so engaged and 
about 20 per cent, of those who reach the Fourth Reader extend their course 
to the secondary schools. 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) per year : 



1902. 

Sites and buildings $1.81 

Teachers' salaries 22.37 

All other expenses 7.27 

For all purposes $31.45 



1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


$1.89 


$1.82 


$3.61 


22.22 


22.40 


23.26 


7.61 


7.43 


8.18 



$31.72 ,,$31.65 $35.05 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) per year : 



1902. 

Sites and buildings $3.07 

Teachers' salaries 37.93 

All other purposes 12.34 

For all purposes » $53.34 



1903. 


:904. 


1905. 


$3.18 


$3.02 


$5.89 


37.31 


37.10 


37.94 


12.78 


12.30 


13.35 



$53.27 $52.42 $57.18 



2 S — Classification of Pupils, etc. 









Er 


glish. 








Mathematics. 






Science 










6 




>, 


















Year. 


a 


o 


+g 




o 


►^ 


•a . 
















a 




Eh 




x 




* c 
















s 

5 


o 
p, 


3 


'"p 


2 


■s. 

s 

■7 


.2 sj 




>'_ 


- 
S 




S-" 






XI 




S3 

O 


$ 
be 


.2 


■5 z 


83 

-2 


a 


o 

1 


8 
7. 


a 


a 




bo 


tJD 




o 


a 




■eS 


3o 


o 






oj 












<x> 


a! 






o 






Xi 


c 




w 


w 


* 


O 


° 


M 


< 


< 


O 


c* 


Ph 


° 


pq 


1867 


5,467 


4,091 




5,264 




t4,634 


5,526 


2,841 


1,847 


141 


1,876 


840 




1872 


7,884 


7,278 




7.715 




t",513 


7,834 


6,033 


2,592 


174 


1,921 


1,151 




1877 


K.K19 


8,772 




9,158 




-(•9,106 


9,227 


8,678 


8,113 


359 


2,168 


2,547 




1882 


12,275 


12,189 




12,106 




tl2,220 


12,261 


11,742 


11,148 


397 


2,880 


2,522 




1887 


17,086 


17,171 


1(5,649 


16,962 




fl7,010 


16,939 


16,904 


14,839 


1,017 


5,265 


3,411 


4.640 


1892 


22,530 


22,525 


22,468 


22,118 




f22,328 


21,869 


22,229 


17,791 


1,154 


6,601 


3,710 


6,189 


1897 


19,591 


24,195 


24,176 


13,747 


18,318 


20,304 


19,798 


24,105 


16,788 


1,652 


11,002 


5,489 


12,892 


1902 


21,576 


24,241 


23,768 


14,500 


14,768 


16,817 


21,594 


22,953 


16,881 


1 ,662 


12,758 


5,860 


9,051 


1904., 


25.019 


27,298 


*27.070 


18,493 


19,014 


21,520 


25,249 


25,243 


20,519 


1,759 


17,837 


9,038 


11,463 


1905 


25,399 


27,667 


*27,775 


22,003 


22,566 


23,975 


25,455 


23,847 


22,123 


1,913 


21,901 


12,413 


13,569 



English Literature. f History 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xvii 



2. — Classification of Pupils, etc. — Continued. 



Year. 



Languages. 



- 

a 

oj 



c3 

^ d 

O 0D 



9 • 



o &c 
d 

«'& 

3-d 

d « 



1867. 
1872. 
1877. 
1882. 
1887. 
1892. 
1897. 
1902. 
1904. 
1905. 



5,171 


802 


3,860 


900 


4,955 


871 


4,591 


815 


5,409 


997 


9,006 


1,070 


16,873 


1,421 


18,884 


631 


19,409 


637 


19/09 


603 



2,164 

2,828 

3,091 

5,363 

6,180 

10,398 

13,761 

13,595 

16,039 

16,430 



341 
442 
962 
1,350 
2,796 
5,169 
3,280 
3,274 
3,366 



6761 

2,176 

2,755 

3,441 

14,295 

16,980 

12,252 

10,721 

11,596 

13,641 



1,283/ 

3,127 

3,621 

5,642 

14,064 

16,700 

11,647 

.11,334 

13,334 

13,152 



486 
555 
881 
1,141 
1,111 
1,368 
1,573 
1,834 
1,949 



300 
328 
646 
882 
1,006 
1,153 
743 
811 
859 



213 
564 
751 
79J 
398 
409 
705 
739 
861 



671 36 
76 
69 
67 
54 
51 
43 
52 
56 
57 





28 




35 




37 




58 


1,527 


77 


2,056 


87 


1,238 


82 


1,240 


82 


1,305 


83 



The occupations of the parents of all pupils enrolled in the High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes are shown below, as well as the percentage of the 
whole in each class of the Province deriving advantages from those secondary 
schools : 

„ Classes. No. in each Class. 



Percentage. 
29.20 
26.14 
21.99 

9.36 

7.55 

5.76 



Agricultural 8,386 

Commercial 7,491 

Mechanical 6,303 

Professional 2,680 

Laboring occupations 2,151 

Other callings 1,650 

The statistics in detail of the various Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools in the Province will be found on pages 34 to 57 of this Report. 

Y. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, ETC. 

1. — Table showing the Number of Teachers in Training at County Model 
Schools, Normal College, Provincial Normal Schools, etc., 1877-1905. 



Year. 



1877 
1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1904 
1905 



County Model 
Schools. 



,d 

o 



1,146 

882 
1,491 
1,283 
1,645 
1,171 
1,122 
1,209 



fte$ 

£8 



1,124 
837 
1,376 
1,225 
1,384 
1,138 
1,097 
1,186 



Normal College. 



96 
180 
132 
166 
170 





br 


a 


JV 


o 


o 


u 


U 


E 


"oS 


ft 


a 


o 


Fh 


u 


o 




to 



1,630 00 
4,374 00 
2,405 00 
2,775 00 
2,965 00 



Normal and Model Schools, etc. 



, 1 


, , 


, , 




__ 


o 
o 


O T3 
O <D 


"o d 
o a 


II 


O 


c 

go 


GO fl 


-d u 

GO bD 


GO <3 

be 


° ° 55 


3 


o3 


a * 


t3 'd . 


5 « 

^ 


s-s.84 

P GO O o3 


d c$ 


o £ 
5ZJ» 




Oflg 

5^5 




'3 g o.S £< 


S 3 § 


3% 


O m 


or d* 

o us 


• d d 




* 


53 


& 


fc 


$ c. 


W 








$ c. 


13 


257 


8 


643 


7,909 22 


25,780 88 


16 


260 


15 


799 


13,783 50 


44,888 02 


13 


441 


18 


763 


16,427 00 


40,188 6tf 


12 


428 


22 


842 


19,016 00 


45,724 12 


13 


407 


23 


832 


18,797 59 


46,390 91 


16 


619 


31 


958 


20,735 00 


56,672 98 


*25 


304 


36 


982 


20,212 00 


64,999 19 


*27 


306 


36 


1,023 


21,794 00 


67,091 63 



^Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Model School. 



XV111 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



2. — Entrance Examinations, 1877-1906. 

No. of candidates No. of candidates 

examined. who passed. 

1877 • • 7,383 3,836 

1882 9,607 4,371 

1887 16,248 9,364 

1892 • 16,409 8,427 

1897 16,384 10,502 

1902 18,087 13,300 

1904 19,774 14,632 

1905 20,295 13,431 

1906 21,710 13,819 

3. Non-professional Teachers and Matriculation Examinations, 1906. 





cu 

1 




Fh 


o 


J5 cjd 








S3 


.2 


o 

'3 


S 
co 


.2 3 ft 


, 






CU 

Q 


„ CO 


co . 


„*5 

l-H CO 

h-l-d 


r Mat 

incl 

rlarsl 


CO aJ 

So 


xtx 

13 






H CO 


O 


o 


O _T o 


o 






+J C<3 


^— eG 




•S Sr£ 


a& 


CO 






5- CO 


J- OP 


5h CO 


a oo 


■e ft 




QQ 

s 


S H 


S H 


£H 


G"^CC 


o^ 


^°° 


No candidates 


302 

134 

6 


2,860 

1,540 

206 


725 

425 

45 


667 

406 

47 


2,682 
35 


8 
3 


tio 




4 






No. sustained 


1 


59 


14 


16 


7 











Note— (a) The Part I. Junior Leaving Examination was abolished in 1902. 

lb) In Junior Matriculation column above, 144 scholarship candidates are included. 

(c) The Commercial Diploma Part II. was abolished in 1904. 
* Owing to changes in matriculations the number who passed is not known 
f First examination held in 1906. 

VI. TEACHEES' INSTITUTES. 

This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for twenty-nine years 





IE 
& 



"+3 

QQ 

G 
h- 1 

~02 

03 

3 

H 

'o 
6 


i 

cu 

a 

cu 

o 
6 


cu 

+3 

B 

cu 

II 

6 ft. 


Receipts. 


Expenditure. 


Year. 


a . 
s * 

cu bfi 
> 

IS 
£a 

rj CU 


a 

o . 

g'3 

l 


a 

o 

^ 0Q 

tJ cu 
cu cu 

*CU "02 

a *-< 

O) CU 

fHrQ 

S cu 

§a 

a 

< 


cu 

'cu 
o 

CO 

a 

o 

a 
3 

o 


O 

"53 

ft DD 
CU 

■ §2 
IS 


'S3 

ft 

+3 

a 

o 

a 

O 

H 




42 
62 
66 
69 

73 

77 
79 
80 


1,181 
4,395 

6,781 
8,142 
7,627 
8,515 
8,979 
8,958 


6,468 
6,857 
7,594 
8,480 
9,128 
9,867 
9,554 
9,649 


$ c. 
1,412 50 
2,900 00 
1,800 00 
1,950 00 
2,425 00 
2,515 00 
2,575 00 
2,525 00 


$ c. 
100 00 
300 00 
1,879 45 
2,105 00 
2,01 7 45 
1,877 50 
2,134 45 
1,937 00 


$ c. 

299 75 

1,088 84 

730 66 

875 76 

901 15 

1,171 80 

1,328 45 

1,230 65 


$ c. 
2,769 44 
9,394 28 
10,405 95 
12,043 54 
12,446 20 
13,171 26 
13*, 342 11 
13,604 57 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,127 63 


1877. 

1882 .... 
1887 .... 
1892 .... 
1897" .... 
1902' .... 
1904' 
1905' .... 


453 02 
1,234 08 
1,472 41 
1,479 88 
1,437 18 
1,050 22 
1,054 01 


5,355 33 
4,975 50 
0,127 46 
6,598 84 
7,188 45 
7,229 06 
7,615 19 



See pages 62 to 64 for details for 1905, 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



xix 



VII. COMPARATIVE SCHOOL STATISTICS OF ONTARIO AND THE 

UNITED STATES. 

These tables give statistics of the primary and secondary schools of the 
divisions, North Atlantic, South Atlantic, South Central, North Central, 
and Western of the United States, of that country as a whole, and of the 
Province of Ontario. The headings to the tables are explanatory of the figures 
given in each case. 

1. — Percentage of the total population enrolled; Number attending daily for 

each 100 enrolled. 



United States. 



North Atlantic Division 
South Atlantic Division. 
South Central Division . 
North Central Division . 
Western Division 



Percentage 

of total 
population 
enrolled. 



Number 
attending 
daily for 
each 100 
enrolled. 



Ontario 




69.92 

74.56 
64.69 
64.12 
71.04 
71.66 

59.28 



2. — Teachers' Salaries. 





Average monthly salaries 
of teachers.- 




Male. 


Female. 


United States . . 


$ c. 
*50.96 

*67.55 
*32 12 

*43.51 
54.54 

70.98 

t63.S9 


$ c. 
*41 54 


North Atlantic Division 


*43 57 


South Atlantic Division. 


*29 51 


South Central Division 


*35 77 


North Central Division 


42 30 




56 42 


Ontario ' 


f35.64 





* Average for those States reporting salaries. t Alio wing 10 months to the school year. 
3. — Number and sex of Teachers; Percentage of Male Teachers. 





Whole number of different 
teachers employed 


Percentage of male teachers. 




Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


1870-71 


1879-80 


1889-90 


1899-1900 


1903-4 


United States 

North Atlantic Divis'n 
South Atlantic Divis'n 
South Central Division 
North Central Division 
Western Division 

Ontario 


113,744 
17,283 
18,332 

28,654 

43,678 

5,797 

2,478 


341,498 
95,873 
34,191 
40.149 

148,606 
22,679 

8,137 


455,242 

113,156 

52,523 

68,803 

192,284 

28,476 

10,615 


41.0 
26-2 
63.8 
67.5 
43.2 
45.0 

1870- 
54.8 


42.8 
28.8 
62.5 
67.2 

41.7 

40.3 

1880- 
50.5 


34.5 
20.0 
49.1 
57.5 
32.4 
31.1 

1890- 
36.3 


29.9 
18.4 
40.7 
47.4 
28.3 
24.7 

1900- 
30.4 


25.0 
15.3 
34.9 
41.7 
22.7 
20.4 

1905- 
23 3 











XX 



THE REPORT OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. No. 12 



4. — The School revenue compared with the School population and the adult 
male population (21 years and upward) ; Percentage analysis of the 
School revenue. 





Amount raised for 
each person 5 to 18 
years of age. 


ft 
< * 


Amount each adult 
male must contri- 
bute to provide $1 
for each person 5- 
18 years. 


Per cent, of the whole revenue 
derived from — 




State 
Taxes. 


Local 
Taxes. 


All other 
sources. 


United States 


$ c. 

12 12 

20 46 
4 48 
3 94 

13 68 
20 70 

11 33 


$ c. 

12 35 

16 79 
5 96 
5 39 

13 47 

14 66 

12 41 


$ c. 
1 02 

82 
1 33 
1 37 

98 
71 

1 10 


15.25 

12.47 
33.17 

38.81 

" 8.49 

27.80 

*6.43 


69.22 

69.72 
52.48 
40.73 
78.05 
61.40 

67.58 


15.53 


North Atlantic Division. . . 
South Atlantic Division. . . 
South Central Division. . . . 
North Central Division . . . 
Western Division 

Ontario 


17.81 
14.35 
20.46 
13.46 
10.80 

25.99 







* Government grants. 

5. — Expenditure per pupil (based on average attendance); Average daily 
expenditure per pupil; Percentage analysis of School expenditure. 





Expenditure per capil 
average attendance 


a of 


Average daily 

expenditure 

per pupil. 


Per cent, of total 
expenditure 
devoted to — 




B 

CD 

m 
„ bJD 


0D 
"IS 

w 


O 02 
r^ C 


r-C 
CD 
P<r-4 


GD 

03 

'u 

la 


13 




GO 


other 
rposes. 




u 3 


pH 


rH 53 


-2 a 


r-l 


-t-s 




o3 


,_ s 




p,o 


o 


O ft 


O ft 


O 


o 




— i ft 




^ 


f^ 


to 


H 


Ph 


H 


OQ 


ce 


«5 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Cents. 


Cents. 








United States 


4 37 


14 83 


4 94 


24 14 


10.1 
11.6 


16.5 


18.1 


61.4 


20.5 


North Atlantic Division 


8 32 


20 53 


7 90 


36 75 


20.8 


22.6 


55.9 


21.5 


South Atlantic " 


1 20 


7 81 


1 56 


10 57 


6.7 


9.0 


11.3 


73.9 


14.8 


South Central " 


98 


7 44 


1 16 


9 58 


6.9 


8.9 


10.2 


77.6 


12.2 


North Central " 


4 05 


16 07 


5 58 


25 70 


10.3 


16.4 


15.8 


62.5 


21.7 


Western ' ' 


7 01 


21 12 


7 53 


35 66 


14.3 


24.1 


19.7 


59.2 


21.1 


Ontario 


3 70 


15 11 


6 16 


24 97 


7.6 


12.6 


14.8 


60 5 


24.7 









6. — Progress of School expenditure per capita of total population. 





Expended per capita of total population 






1870-71. 


1879-80. 


1889-90. 


1899-1900. 


1903-4. 


United States 


$ c. 

1 75 

2 38 
63 
73 

2 14 
2 15 
1872— 
1 50 


$ c. 
1 56 

1 97 

68 
55 

2 03 
2 41 
1882— 
1 77 


% c. 
2 24 

2 76 
99 

97 

2 81 

3 37 
1892— 
2 26 


$ c. 

2 84 

3 99 

1 24 

1 08 

3 27 

4 21 
1902— 

2 61 


$ c. 
3 36 


North Atlantic Division 

South Atlantic Division 

South Central Division 

North Central Division 

Western Division 


4 68 
1 44 
1 30 
3 85 

5 44 


Ontario 


1905— 
3 31 



APPENDICES 



1 E. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX A.— STATISTICAL TABLES. 
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

L— Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. 



Counties, 

including incorporated villages, 
but not cities or towns) etc. 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, N.E. Muskoka, S. 

Nipissing & E. Parry Sound 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville 

21 Lennox and Addington 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell 

32 Prince Edward 

3*3 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S. E. Muskoka. . 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Algoma and Manitoulin 

43 Nipissing N., etc 

44 Parry Sound W 

45 Rainy River and Thunder Bay 

46 Albany 



CT3 . 

o c cp 

O fl ?D 

2 n >- 
— . fe ® 

a> ,— 1 

Xi rO <m 



10 
cp be 

fl «*-< 

P o 

OQ 

go *- 

r— H 03 



Totals 

Totals, incorporated villages 
Totals, rural schools 



3,773 

12,187 
8,691 
4,889 
4,997 
4,273 
6,782 

10,031 
6,564 
4,924 

14,534 
4,859 

4,733 
4,034 

10,865 

13,82(5 
9,218 

11,045 
5,533 
9,859 
4,576 
4,983 

10,787 
6,221 
7,215 
7,646 
8,368 
4,572 
8,309 
5,965 

13,299 
2,885 

13,259 

16,466 
4,779 
7,781 
7,606 
6,030 

10,882 
6,054 

14,144 
6,883 
3,959 
4,714 
2,165 
120 



GO 



is 

r- S S 



03 

<P 
I If 



345,285 
34,344 



310,941 



9 
L0 
16 

II 
33 
L4 
14 
12 
40 
1! 
60 

16 

32 

...I 
18j 

5 
23 

19 

12 

311 

36 

i 

31! 

1 

7 
2 

'i3 

19 
19 

6 
30 
38 
13 
21 

8 
24 
17 

1 

19 
40 
i:; 
22 



786 
22 



764 



3,025 
9,620 
6,504 
4.217 
4,083 
4,105 
5,462 
6,086 
5,432 
3,837 
11,723 
3,490 

4,113 
3,138 
8,557 
9,265 
7,575 
8,597 
3,998 
8,441 
4,018 
3,684 
8,384 
5,124 
5,464 
6,384 
6,594 
3,605 
5,804 
4,603 
5,059 
2,553 
7,335 

14,586 
3,624 
6,303 
5,341 
4,863 
7,384 
4,558 

11,215 
5,734 
2,895 
3,656 
1,867 
10 



261,912 
27,330 



234,582 






3,035 
9,633 
6,521 
4,228 
4,117 
4,121 
5,476 
6,100 
5,474 
3,848 
11,786 
3,507 

4,148 
3,139 
8,575 
9,275 
7,598 
8,616 
4,011 
8,472 
4,055 
3,693 
8,395 
5,157 
5,467 
6,392 
6,597 
3,605 
5,818 
4,622 
5,080 
2,560 
7,369 

14,625 
3,637 
6,325 
5,349 
4,887 
7,404 
4,559 

11,234 
5,780 
2,909 
3,680 
1,867 
13 



262,759 
27,364 



235,395 



-J. 


GO 





!_ 


w 


O 


1,576 


1,459 


5,016 


4,617 


3,469 


3,052 


2,278 


1,950 


2,155 


1,962 


2,088 


2,033 


2,847 


2,629 


3,132 


2,968 


2,885 


2,589 


1,992 


1,856 


6,102 


5,684 


1,827 


1,680 


2,121 


2,027 


1,658 


1,4811 


4,377 


4,198; 


4,833 


4,442 


3,948 


3,650 


4,485 


4,131' 


2,031 


1,980 


4,280 


4,192! 


2,088 


1,9671 


1,961 


1,732 


4,393 


4,002 


2,616 


2,541 1 


2,838 


2,629 


3,325 


3,067 


3,456 


3,141 


1,942 


1,663 


3,091 


2,727 


2,361 


2,261 


2,610 


2,470 


1,348 


1,212 


3,839 


3,530 


7,615 


7,01C 1 


1,912 


1,725| 


3,284 


3,041 ! 


2,902 


2,447 


2,589 


2,298' 


3,956 


3,448 ! 


2,347 


2,212, 


6,053 


5,181 


2,959 


2,821; 


1,486 


1,423 


1,876 


1,804; 


975 


892 


6 


7 


136,928 


125,831 


13,653 


13,711 


123,275 


112,120 



>»o o $ 

C3 CD rn +J 

§JMf ?' 
Hap 



1,725 

5,419! 
3,262 
1,884' 
2,262 
2,195 
3,168 
3,314 
2,251 
1,836 
5,993 
2,150 

1,680 
1,706! 
4,429 
5,668 
3,985 
5,215 
2,354! 
4.457 
1,978 
1,955 
5,019= 
2,707 
2,935 
3,475 
3,876 
1,843 
3,657 
2,402! 
2,494 
1,325 
3,184: 
7,123! 
1,856! 
3,012! 
3,401 ! 
2,493j 
4,370] 
2,518 
5,991 
2,696 
1,440 
1,603 
889 
12 



57 
56 
50 
44 
55 
53 
58 
54 
41 
47 
51 
61 

40 
54 
52 
61 
52 
60 
59 
53 
49 
53 
59 
52 
54 
54 
59 
51 
63 
52 
49 
51 
43 
42 
51 
48 
63 
51 
59 
55 
53 
47 
49 
43 
48 
92 



139,207! 53 



17,107 



122,100 



63 



la E. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Continued. 



Cities. 



S fl „• 

1 -a 

W (P O 
O £ 03 

O O) QJ 

o 



1 Belleville 1,955 

2 Brantford 3,866 

3 Chatham j 2,692 

4 Guelph 3,197 

5 Hamilton 14,675 

6 Kingston 5,640 

7 London 9,659 

8 Niagara Falls , 1,886 

9 Ottawa | 17,904 

10 Peterborough 2,237 

11 St. Catharines 2,440 

12 St, Thomas 4,269 

13 Stratford 2,752 

14 Toronto 52,358 

15 Windsor 4,020 

16 Woodstock 1,846 



Totals 131,396 



8 



Towns. 

Alexandria . . . 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg . 

Arnprior 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim 

11 Both well 

12 Bowmanville . 

13 Bracebridge. . . 

14 Brampton 

15 Brockville 

16 Bruce Mines . . 

17 Cache Bay 

18 Carleton Place 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 Collingwood . . 

22 Copper Cliff. . 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

25 Dresden 

26 Dundas 

27 Dunnville 

28 Durham 

29 East Toronto . 

30 Essex 

31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances . . 

33 Fort William . 



086 
596 
874 
600 

1,170 
465 
450 

1,615 

2,834 
473 
251 
556 

1,000 
644 

2,448 
255 
250 

1,057 
513 

1,003 

1,857 
324 

2,031 
825 
475 
984 
625 
488 
820 
442 
426 
324 

1,525 




70 
337 
370 
299 
588 
357 
386 

1.147; 

1,6161 
417 
210 
471 
700 
506 

1,254 
244 
192 
824 
429 
557 

1,319 
323 
650 
600 
407 
574 
450 
425 
791 
337 
314 
177 
845 



70 
341 
370 
299 
588 
357 
386 

1,147 

1,616 
417 
211 
471 
700 
506 

1,254 
244 
192 
824 
429 
557 

1,319 
323 
650 
601 
407 
574 
450 
425 
791 
337 
314 
177 
845 



36 
218 
182 
151 
276 
177 
172 
561 
815 
218 
108 
239 
317 
264 
585 
111 

89 
396 
236 
282 
682 
173 
346 
308 
195 
271 
227 
191 
391 
174 
141 

76 
425 



123 

18k 
148 
312 
180 
214 
586 
801 
199 
103 
232 
383 
242 
669 
133 
103 
428 
193 
275 
637 
150 
304 
293 
212 
303 
223 
234 
400 
163 
173 
101 
420 



671 1 58 

1,208 75 
284 



146 
349 



348 50 

357 I 70 

872| 69 

148! 61 



102i 
609 



53 

74 



313! 73 

3601 65 

939 71 

198 1 61 



494 
455 



265! 65 



408 
300 
318 
495 
205 
219 
85 
504 



71 
67 
75 
62 
61 
70 
48 
60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Continued. 



Towns. 



34 Gait 

35 Gananoque 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay 

38 Gravenhurst. . . . 

39 Haileybury 

40 Hanover 

41 Harriston 

42 Hawkesbury 

43 Hespeler 

44 Huntsville 

45 Ingersoll 

46 Kincardine 

47 Kingsville 

48 Kenora 

49 Leamington .... 

50 Lindsay 

51 Listowel 

52 Little Current . . 

53 Massey 

54 Mattawa 

55 Meaford 

56 Midland 

57 Milton 

58 Mitchell 

59 Mount- Forest. . . 

60 Napanee 

61 New Liskeard . . 

62 Newmarket 

63 Niagara 

64 North Bay 

65 North Toronto.. 

66 Oakville 

67 Orangeville 

68 Orillia 

69 Oshawa 

70 Owen Sound 

71 Palmerston 

72 Paris 

73 Parkhill 

74 Parry Sound .... 

75 Pembroke 

76| Penetanguishene 

77 Perth 

78 Petrolea 

79 Picton 

80 Port Arthur .... 

81 Port Hope 

82 Powassan 

83 Prescott 

84 Preston 



o ~ 

"■9 c 

O <x> 

o 



2,057 

1.058 

981 

*391 

677 

200 

1,198 
365 

1,488 
503 
630 

1,248 
567 
484 

1,650 
692 

1,844 
817 

*340 
250 
450 
513 

1,126 
475 
499 
584 
589 
308 
633 
308 

1,227 
701 
503 
679 

1,552 

1,313 

2,728 
732 
950 
333 

*998 

1,500 
793 
990 
790 
791 

2,200 

1,200 
213 
824 
580 



*> 6 
go 



I. 



■Jl 



r-H Oj 



g £ 

<V c3 

-1-3 >■> 

^ _, 

^£ 



1,299 
752 
571 
307 
615 
170 
465 
326 
167 
481 
579 
759 
406 
366 
884 
505 

1,087 
481 
294 
150 
86 
424 

1,011 
392 
354 
426 
517 
353 
434 
211 
647 
585 
313 
502 
921 
861 

1,685 
343 
505 
305 
906 
668 
691 
456 
849 
526 
826 
793 
214 
428 
387 





o.S 






05 


rH O 


number 
Is attend 
ol. 








CM bC 






Eh O 

O) 5 to 




otal 
pupi 
scho 


DQ 

O 


00 




Oh 


H 


pq 


3 


< 




1,299 


652 


647 


962 




752 


389 


363 


509 




571 


272 


299 


395 


i 


308 


131 


177 


185 




615 


318 


297 


378 




170 


70 


100 


66 




465 


217 


248 


320 




326 


150 


176 


220 




167 


91 


76 


96 




481 


245 


236 


336 




579 


290 


289 


363 




759 


375 


384 


520 




406 


185 


221 


268 




370 


185 


185 


249 




884 


445 


439 


568 




505 


264 


241 


323 




1,087 


539 


548 


800 




481 


255 


226 


318 




294 


139 


155 


154 




150 


82 


68 


70 




86 


48 


38 


40 




424 


210 


214 


295 




1,011 


490 


521 


621 




392 


206 


186 


264 




354 


173 


181 


248 




426 


223 


203 


289 




517 


241 


276 


361 




354 


188 


166 


142 




434 


218 


216 


305 




211 


119 


92 


106 




647 


327 


320 


437 




585 


279 


306 


318 




314 


159 


155 


239 




502 


243 


259 


346 


2 


923 


472 


451 


622 




861 


417 


444 


557 




1,685 


808 


877 


1,205 




343 


179 


164 


243 




505 


279 


226 


362 




305 


167 


138 


143 


2 


908 


409 


499 


511 




668 


330 


338 


478 




691 


366 


325 


407 




456 


233 


223 


331 




849 


413 


436 


567 




526 


272 


254 


347 




826 


409 


417 


520 




793 


385 


408 


583 




215 


96 


119 


131 




428 


200 


228 


280 




387 


. 180 


207 


289 



bCO) ej 

egg 
p. >£ 

& * * 



* Estimated. 

t Including Protestant Separate School. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
I. — Table A. — School Population, Attendance, etc. — Concluded. 



Towns. 


School population 
between 5 and 21 
years of age. 


*> a3 
go 

•S3 

Ph 


Pupils between 5 
and 21 years of 
age. 


cq * 

u a 
c c 

a 

■a? 

a ' 


Total number of 
pupils attending 
school. 


O 


"5 


Average daily at- 
tendance of 
pupils. 


Percentage of 
average to total 
attendance. 


85 Rainy River 

86 Renfrew 


295 

1,047 
527 
779 
497 

2,230 

1,618 
559 
656 

1,100 
501 
306 
715 
561 

1,500 
760 
434 
207 
584 
689 

4,813 
973 
431 
467 
682 
637 
720 

1,035 
430 
683 

*851 
646 


"l2 


237 

462 
420 
531 
179 

1,566 

1,250 
320 
493 

1,033 
414 
290 
487 
485 
299 
229 
383 
183 
408 
435 

1,639 
548 
362 
154 
368 
510 
634 
554 
277 
380 
632 
597 




237 

462 
420 
531 
179 

1,566 

1,250 
320 
493 

1,033 
414 
290 
499 
1 486 
299 
229 
383 
183 
408 
435 

1,639 
548 
362 
154 
368 
1 511 
634 
554 
277 
380 
632 
597 


125 
244 
203 
275 

87 
761 
627 
170 
243 
502 
180 
160 
. 254 
241 
163 
118 
189 

92 
197 
228 
818 
267 
175 

73 
177 
274 
323 
287 
146 
202 
335 
270 


112 
218 
217 
256 

92 
805 
623 
150 
250 
5S1 
234 
130 
245 
245 
136 
111 
194 

91 
211 
207 
821 
281 
187 

81 
191 
237 
311 
267 
131 
178 
297 
327 


Ill 
293 
280 
381 
102 

1,071 
804 
224 
314 
669 
285 
197 
291 
339 
169 
143 
201 
112 
214 
317 

1,030 
365 
227 
105 
300 
257 
407 
432 
171 
246 
421 
397 


47 
63 


87 Ridgetown 

88 St. Marv's 


67 
72 


89 Sandwich . 


57 


90 Sarnia 


68 


91 Sault Ste. Marie .... 

92 Seaforth 


64 
70 


93 Simcoe 


64 


94 Smith's Falls 

95 Southampton 

96 Stayner 


65 

69 
68 


97 Steel ton 


58 


98 Strathroy 


70 


99 Sturgeon Falls 

100 Sudbury 

101 Thessalon 


56 
62 
52 


102 Thornbury 

103 Thorold 


61 
52 


104 Tillsonburg 

105 Toronto Junction . . 

106 Trenton 


73 
63 
67 


107 Uxbridge 

108 Vankleekhill 

109 Walkerton 

110 Walkerville 

111 Wallaceburg 

112 Waterloo 

113 Welland 


63 
68 
81 
50 
64 
78 
62 


114 Whitby 


65 


115 Wiarton 

116 Wingham 


67 
66 


Totals 


101,351 

310,941 

131,396 

101,351 

34,344 


17 


63,228 


1 


5 63,260 


31,472 


31,788 


41,827 


66 






Totals. 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities . . 


764 
11 
17 
22 


234,582 
71,137 
63,228 
27,330 


4 

1 
1 


9 235,395 
3 71,151 
5 63,260 
2 27,364 


123,275 

" 35,854 

31,472 

13,653 


112,120 
35,297 
31,788 
13,711 


122,100 
51,043 
41,827 
17,107 


52 

72 


3 Towns 

4 Villages 


66 
63 






5 Grand totals, 1905 .... 

6 Grand totals, 1904 


578,032 
576,537 


814 
790 


396,277 
395,922 


10 


9 397,170 
2 396,814 


204,254 
203,417 


192,916 
193,397 


232,077 
227,165 


58.43 
57.25 


7 Increases 


1,495 


24 


355 


*2 


356 

3 : 


837 


"*48i 


4,912 


1.18 


8 Decreases 
















9 Percentages 




.20 


99.78 


.0 


2 


51.43 


48.57 


58.43 











Estimated. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II.— Table B. — Number of pupils in the 



Counties 
(including incorporated 
villages, but not cities 
9 or towns, etc.) 



Reading. 



rt3 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, etc. .. . 

14 Helton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

] 8 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenviile 

21 Lennox & Addington . 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell . . 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe & W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria&S.E.Muskoka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Algoma& Manitoulin. 

43 Nipissing, N., etc 

44 Parry Sound, W 

45 Rainy River & Thun- 

der Bay 

46 Albany 



Totals 

Totals Incor. Villages. 

Totals Rural Schools .. 



Cities. 

1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

:; Chatham 

4 fiuelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Niagara Falls. 

9 Ottawa 

10 Peterborough 

11 St. Catharines 

12 i-t. Thomas. . . 

13 Stratford 

14 Toronto 

15 Windsor 

16 Woodstock ... 

Totals .... 



632; 
2, 275 1 
1,488; 

908| 

941 

717 
1,249 
1,700 
1,312 
1,218 
2,948 

646 
J, 177 

748 
2,543 
1,523 
1,898 
2,167 

924 
1,874 
1.009 

840 1 
1,634, 
1,101 
1.258 1 
l,40l! 

1,335! 

763! 
1,065 

1,119! 

1,750; 

547 
2,027 j 
3,3191 

873 
1,408 
1,0*6 
1,097 
1,467 

916 
2,809 
1,749 
1,061 
1,092 

514 
5 



62.103 
6,390 



55.713 



«3 



303 
708 
290 
3U 

1,267 
512 
976 
407 

1,086 
540 
367 
fill 
310 

5,817 
571 
399 



14.505 



362 

1,262 
877 
556 
513 
613 
627 

1,186 
866 
575 

1,489 
521 
823 
436 

1,410 
929 
941 

1,291 
545 

1,127 
513 
442 

1.134J 
643! 
642 
844 
881 1 
533) 
6311 
7001 
814 
293 

1.2361 

2, 157 1 
470) 
824 i 
680 
716 
865 
527 

1,542 
963 
592 
515 

292 
2 



36.40T 
3,812 



32,588 



528 

1,939 

1,109 

712 

994 j 

973 

1,003 

1,241 

917 

768 

2,604 

702 

7921 

520 

1,678 

1,703 

1,280 

1,456 

803 

1,555 

695 

625 

1,490 

1,087 

1,161 

1,167 

1,119 

568 1 

1,075 

869 

839 

418 

1,331 

2,735 

764 

1,301 

1,297 

866 

1,277 

780 

1,995 

1,008 

482 

633 

331 

31 

49,193 
5,005 



44,188 



684 

1,981 

1,198 

935 

699 

850 

1,060 

1,068 

1,109 

529 

2,436 

687 

697 

613l 

1,519; 

2,036: 

1,338! 

1,569 

790 

1,788 1 

793 j 

828| 

1,829 

975! 

1,150 

1,323 

1,301 

849 1 

1,563 

926 

790 

440 

1,413 

2,863 

752 

1,336 

1,308 

956 

1,708 

1,153 

2,255 

1,037 

461 

752 

367 



52,720 
4,982 



47,738 



675 

l,738i 

1,2831 

927 

7691 

805 1 

1,069 

786 i 

1,155 

681 

1,957 

794 

534 

678 

1,0961 

2,185| 

1.467| 

1,687 

775! 

1,828 

875 

8641 

1.816 

1,131 

1,078 

1,437 

1,467 

772, 

1,255 

876! 

737 

664 

1,074! 

2,753! 

620! 

1,186! 

8251 

l,008i 

1,678 

1.000J 

2,389 

911 

300; 

565 

311: 



154 
435 
566 
L90 
201 
163 
468 
11'.) 
115 
77 
352 
157 
125 

ni 

329 
899 

674 
446 

17-1 
300 
170 

94 
492 
220 
178 
220 
494 
120 
229 
1S2 
150 
198 
288 
798 
158 
270 
183 
244 
409 
183 
244 
112 

13 
123 



50,481 ! 
4,7601 



11,862 
2,415 



45,72l! 9,447 



2,902 
7,508 
6,500 
3,925 
3,885 
3,882 
5.137 
5,725 
5,144 
3,713 

10,649 
3,447 
3,571 
3,119 
6,851 
3,941 
7,474 
7,602 
4,011 
7,931 
3,497 
2,572 
8,279 
5,017 
3,704 
5,711 
5.324 
3,007 
5,433 
3.726 
4,564 
2,435 
6,180 

1 1,084 j 
3,294 j 
5,485! 
4,3191 
4,842 
6,920i 
4, 036i 
9,995 
4,520 
2,791 
2,116 

1,784 
4 



227,556 
24,473 



203.083 



2,331 
6,758 
4,432 
3,178 
3,520 
2,058 
4,401 
3,730 
3,330 
2,605 
9,026 
2,687 
2,305 
2,378 
6,000 
4,399 
5,493 
5,772 
2,762 
6,345 
2,683 
2,696 
6,812 
4 141 
3, 830 j 
4,442 
4,619| 
2,629; 
4,461 
3,382! 
2,623 
1,921 1 
4,000; 
10.156! 
2,821 
4,739 1 
3,695| 
3,222 
5,189 
3,348 
8,432 
3,304 
1,147 
2,163 



2,277 
4,998 
2,939 
2,549 
2,843 
1,918 
3,439 
3,690 
2.078 
1,360 
6,5521 
2,400! 
323 ! 
1,776! 
4, 360j 
2,286] 
4,3381 
5,347 1 

l,405j 

4,317l 

1,574 
2,119 
6,226 
3,361! 
2,330 
3,656! 
3,144! 
1,099, 
4,862! 
1,663! 
1,688' 
1,148! 
1,162 
8,378: 
1,558 
2,674! 
3,478! 
2,984 
4,335 
2,646 
6,924 
1.873 
282 
1,035 



2,386 
7,870 
4,454 
3,458 
3,546 
3,224 
4,215 
4,892 
2,977 
2,856 
8,818 
2,759 
2,291 
2,452 
7,307 
4,587 
5,177 
6,488 
2,948 
5,955 
2,614 
2,781 
7,245 
4,210 
4,302 
5,591 
5,071 
3.066 
5,703 
3,440 
3,010 
1,800 
220 
10,497 
3,088 
5,151 
4.243 
3,542 
5,491 
3,704 
8,791 
3,352 
1,370 
2,465 



1.245 805! 1,325 



12 



181,216 132.209 
22,065 19,789 



190.732 
23.336 



159,151 112,4201167.396 



219 


276 


303 


240 




1,066 


967 


876 


1,002 


368 


394 


718 


434 


60 


2,682 


1,921 


2,447 


2,682 


212 


332 


351 


387 




1,572 


1,380 


1,572 


1,572 


201 


231 


485 


308 


102 


1,668 


1,326 


1,546 


1,024 


1,074 


1,114 


2,325 


1,885 


549 


8,186 


6,339 


8,214 


7,030 


277 


299 


662 


635 




2,385 


1,991 


2,385 


2,369 


753 


1,386 


1,376 


1,332 




5,823 


5,823 


5,823 


5,823 


135 


222 


238 


246 




706 


773 


628 


773 


761 


677 


1,311 


1,375 


206 


2,892 


2,892 


689 


2.892 


277 


361 


317 


418 




1,913 


1,096 


442 


1,096 


212 


216 


347 


277 




1,052 


1,052 




840 


238 


367 


434 


433 




2,083 


2,083 


1,973 


2,083 


243 


226 


429 


346 




1,554 


1,080 


1,463 


1,454 


3,530 


6,714 


6,317 


6,982 


974 


29,360 


29,573 


30,207 


27,339 


285 


279 


423 


372 




1,930 


1,930 


1,930 


1,930 


221 
9,009 


238 


362 


349 




849 


1,569 




1,569 


13,332 


16.398 


16.019 


1,891 


65.721 


61.795 


60,195 


61.478 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

various branches of instruction. 





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O 


fe 


O 


w 


o 


< 


S 


a 


1 1,593 


1,148 


1,487 


1,473 


2,137 


1,858 


138 


153 


113 


47 


28 




95 


38 


111 


91 


9 


2 5,101 


2,520 


4,152 


4,636 


5,542 


3.318 


452 


381 


330 


221 


77 




302 


261 


658 


330 




3 4,375 


* 2,156 


2,857 


2,151 


1,480 


3.140 


463 


513 


504 


247 


160 




471 


79 


1,077 


148 




4 2,558 


1,675 


1,758 


1.982 


3,472 


2.354 


141 


173 


167 


115 


39 


7 


122 


106 


370 


92 


18 


5 1,936 


1,430 


2,006 


2,321 


3,604 


3,005 


178 


194 


192 


85 


4 




137 


133 


431 


49 


73 


6 1,999 


1,067 
2,273 


1,360 

2,874 


1,587 
3,244 


2,799 

4, ti72 


1,918 
3,167 


129 
429 


157 

411 


154 
144 


70 
134 


49 
6 


""l 


70 
45 


55 
233 


121 
549 






7 3,213 


390 





8 2,556 


1,011 


1,838 


5,000 


5,038 


2,910 


155 


114 


100 


37 


782 




225 


79 


877 


10 


20 


9 2,754 


1,705 


2,125 


1,839 


2,824 


2,205 


132 


80 


71 


24 


18 


2 


27 


41 


202 


36 


2 


10, 1,492 


990 
3,333 


1,265 

5,081 


1,498 
7,514 


3,617 
10,275 


1,726 

4,247 


89 
627 


80 
366 


77 
270 


36 
126 


25 

2 


"io 


40 

187 


82 

142 


145 
511 






11 6.096 


454 


. 58 


12 2,052 


1,282 


1,523 


1,626 


3,507 


3,507 


139 


147 


lis 


83 


10 


10 


93 


81 


877 


10 


10 


13 1 449 


1,163 
2,326 
2,363 


1,000 
1,484 
3,626 


722 
1,657 
5,412 


804 
2,944 
6,654 


130 

2,899 
4,919 


89 
110 

887 


'.)5 
131 
321 


92 
128 

308 













30 
416 

583 






14 2.243 


41 

,1.-, 


33 
11 




177 
196 


50 
271 





15 2,934 


102 


20 


15 3,354 


1,785 


2,722 


1.895 


4,059 


2,015 


573 


519 


585 


225 


71 


3 


289 


202 


603 


138 


108 


17 4,613 


2,752 


3,268 


3,886 


5,176 


4,609 


1,016 


662 


662 


69 


87 


6 


532 


103 


2,068 


292 


20 


18 3,887 


2,573 


3,924 


4.(10) 


7,340 


5,330 


359 


415 


398 


189 


69 


1 


270 


212 


571 


284 




19 ,1,973 


1,127 


1,501 


447 


3,211 


2,211 


170 


167 


161 


94 


71 




144 


72 


238 


220 




20 4,117 


3.003 


3,601 


3,837 


5,146 


2,823 


270 


278 


274 


75 


25 




144 


45 


456 


• 71 




21 2,165 


1,400 


1.714 


1,644 


3,276 


1.921 


152 


146 


127 


43 


5 




85 


87 


99 


46 




22 2,109 


1,481 


1,583 


1.725 


2,517 


1,693 


192 


76 


39 


13 


3 




22 


54 


337 


39 




23 4,422 


3,368 


4,293 


5.364 


7,793 


4,683 


424 


447 


411 


110 


41 




272 


108 


1,604 


476 




24 2,640 


1,778 


2,346 


3.:<">5 


4,838 


3,641 


257 


200 


188 


35 


3 




249 


152 


903 


19 


15 


25 2,724 


1,189 


1,691 


1.906 


3,792 


2,114 


150 


164 


143 


71 


26 




55 


55 


336 


250 


10 


26 3,380 


2,310 


2,826 


2,857 


4,394 


3,015 


258 


202 


177 


15 


2 




145 


83 


480 


100 


32 


27 3,508 


2,239 


2,993 


2,633 


4,647 


2,638 


432 


452 


409 


246 


62 


28 


324 


277 


326 






28 1.940 


1.517 
2,000 
1,500 


1,704 
2,892 
1,863 


1,407 
2.376 
1,928 


2,831 
5,684 
2,649 


1,374 

5,083 
1,818 


80 

228 
182 


118 

215 

99 


118 

206 

96 


50 

11 
6 


34 

5 

5 


'"'•3 


33 
246 
119 


7 
15 
36 


116 

1,306 
151 






29 3.925 







30 2,848 


23 




31 2.196 


1,076 
1,015 
1,737 
4,973 


1,575 
1,157 
2,240 
6,265 


1,484 
1,340 
1,616 
5,579 


3,311 

2,325 

60 

10.355 


2,515 
1,033 
1,932 
8,596 


163 
197 
265 
856 


138 

162 
269 
828 


137 
152 
246 
734 


34 
26 

18 
271 


2,108 
19 




37 
104 

71 
491 


57 

96 

1 

948 


167 

766 

402 

1,859 






32 1,502 






33 3,806 






34 7.926 


234 


10 


i 




35 1.911 


1.078 
1,976 


1,586 
2,776 


1,857 
2,401 


2,847 
9,898 


1,331 

2,275 


163 
270 


154 

261 


139 
221 


52 
49 


122 

27 


"ik 


119 
137 


128 

172 


202 
157 






36 2,844 


141 


146 


37 2,232 


1,127 
1,575 
2,554 


1,929 
1,964 
3,576 


1,247 
2,066 
3,136 


4,426 
2,149 
5,101 


2,380 
1,301 
3,899 


156 
230 
353 


141 
223 
370 


124 
200 
346 


52 

21 
115 


6 
11 
82 


164 
2 

8 


63 
22! 
295 


83 
104 
147 


189 
229 
743 






33 2,887 






39 4,470 


304 


33 


40 2,776 


1,265 


2,121 


1,615 


3,902 


2,092 


167 


178 


168 


24 


5 


2 


133 


117 


309 


78 


9 


41 6,041 


3,876 


5,147 


4,362 


-.397 


3,830 


584 


219 


189 


115 


75 




104 


146 


390 


450 


81 


42 2,539 


1.515 


1,898 


1,996 


3,266 


1,615 


162 


104 


105 


19 


9 




45 


36 


277 






43 1,062 


436 

866 


747 
1,879 


575 

1,011 


359 
1,904 


539 
1,394 


16 
124 


12 
120 


12 
115 


I 
35 


1,455 




13 
45 


7 
71 


80 

207 






44 1.789 






45 709 


411 


692 


817 


1,108 


804 


60 


51 


46 


7 


3 




63 


47 


65 


25 




46 8 


7 




12 




12 













































134,654 


81,951 


108,907 


113,640 


185,430 


121,819 


12,667 


10,706 


10.026 


3,422 


5,909 


279 


7,057 


5,318 


22,660 


4,669 


664 


15,746 


9,624 


13,560 


14,331 


22,201 


15,070 


2,272 


2.345 


2.206 


1,409 


844 


73 


2,104 


1,349 


611 


780 


172 


118,908 


72,327 


95,347 


99,309 


163,229 


106,749 


10,395 


8.361 


7,820 


2,013 


5,065 


206 


4,953 


3,969 


22,049 


3,889 


492 



1 543 


240 

561 

865 

308 

3,327 

1,006 

2,487 

419 

206 

248 

277 

438 

238 

5,478 

695 

249 


591 

1,076 

968 

793 

4,167 

1,135 

3,696 

595 

1,375 

735 

445 

867 

536 

8,485 

695 

611 


543 
2,422 
1,179 

793 
5,199 
2,257 
5,823 

595 
1,581 

735 

445 

1,472 

1,436 

23,970 

1,930 

849 


1,141 
2,422 
1,572 
1,566 
7,820 
2,385 
5,823 


304 
2,422 
1,572 
1,566 
8,214 
2,357 
























2 762 


60 














60 




255 

1,499 

406 

25 

2,385 


255 


3 895 















134 


4 895 


102 
535 














102 
535 




477 


5 6,555 


535 


377 








242 


1,041 


6 841 








95 


7 1,332 

8 773 


5,823 












































9 2; 892 


i,495 
1,419 
2,083 
1,554 
29,357 
1,930 
1,569 


5,416 
1,038 
1,419 
2,083 
1,554 
30,067 
1,930 


206 




1,440 










206 




1,440 




10 735 












11 624 
























12 867 
























13 336 
























14 25.978 


2,313 






















15 1.930 






















16 611 


















































46.569 


17,042 


26 770 


51.229 


62,136 


65,765 


3.216 


635 


1,817 








242 


903 




6,010 


2,002 













THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 

II.— Table B.— Number of pubils in the 





Reading. 


u 

< 


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1 


6 

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£ 

V 

3 




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IS 

54 

72 

5£ 

162 

92 

46 

272 

258 

97 

33 

107 

210 

101 

255 

52 

97 

218 

107 

129 

360 

146 

227 

202 

72 

148 

135 

79 

256 

99 

72 

66 

265 

360 

267 

82 

56 

180 

65 

129 

76 

47 

73 

190 

154 

106 

112 

323 

134 

270 

131 

99 

59 

21 

127 

320 

122 

67 

77 

95 

105 

122 

59 

217 

195 

6h 

109 

248 


6 
45 
61 
55 

131 
76 
62 

135 

221 
56 
16 
52 
91 
93 

179 
28 
15 

154 
54 
54 

214 
52 
96 
92 

126 

119 
54 
75 

104 
62 
54 
13 

147 

iis 

77 
36 
73 
31 
59 
39 
15 

131 
^6 
62 
47 
51 

129 
69 
69 
52 
51 
23 
7 
32 

208 
29 
36 
54 
84 
85 
40 
13 

153 

101 
61 
69 

1411 


9 

40 

88 

62 

135 

60 

81 

285 

448 

65 

25 

97 

148 

93 

232 

49 

36 

150 

87 

106 

180 

49 

97 

116 

63 

59 

88 

51 

138 

86 

53 

26 

156 

286 

161 

149 

38 

133 

26 

119 

63 

26 

62 

108 

179 

100 

58 

158 

84 

239 

49 

52 

22 

23 

116 

200 

71 

51 

98 

84 

42 

101 

20 

82 

90 

66 

107 

159 


18 

55 

73 

49 

96 

59 

92 

210 

404 

85 

27 

106 

67 

129 

270 

31 

26 

167 

109 

121 

289 

43 

129 

119 

27 

107 

77 

54 

132 

60 

52 

35 

130 

32C 

128 

170 

73 

133 

35 

68 

70 

42 

140 

97 

188 

70 

73 

132 

142 

242 

116 

41 

20 

15 

67 

164 

34 

95 

93 

119 

81 

91 

56 

101 

89 

46 

102 

163 


18 
55 
76 
46 
63 
69 

105 

245 

' 285 

48 

33 

109 

184 
90 

318 
35 
11 

135 
72 

147 

276 
18 

101 
72 
40 

141 
96 
54 

161 
30 
83 
15 

147 

333 

138 
93 
58 
96 
13 
46 
78 
37 
50 
55 

176 
83 
60 

142 
76 

267 

133 
39 
23 
20 
82 

119 
67 

105 
"104 

135 
32 
80 
63 
94 
" 98 
73 

115 

169 


""92 

"29 

"66 

77 

"'49 

7 

"i5 

'"79 

ii2 

'"22 

""47 
"44 

'"25 

43 
"16 

"n 
3 

"'69 

"9 
'"i'i 

43 


70 
341 
370 
299 
588 
357 
386 

1,147 

1,616 
411 
185 
471 
700 
506 

1,254 
232 
192 
824 
429 
557 

1,319 
323 
650 
384 
335 
574 
450 
352 
791 
337 
314 
177 
845 

1,299 
752 
571 
247 
615 
74 
465 
326 
167 
481 
327 
759 
406 
370 
561 
505 

1,087 
481 
294 
150 
86 
424 

1,011 
3*0 
354 
426 
517 
354 
434 
211 
647 
585 
314 
502 
689 


45 
341 
370 
187 
294 
357 
386 

1,147 

1,137 
282 
178 
312 
700 
506 

1,254 
164 
80 
606 
343 
429 

1,319 
323 
413 
356 
335 
307 
261 
318 
535 
176 
188 
177 
845 
998 
545 
571 
217 
357 
93 
336 
250 
105 
481 
307 
759 
300 
305 
884 
371 
748 
350 
294 
150 
58 
424 
691 
392 
251 
376 
517 
354 
297 
152 
456 
272 
314 
393 
672 


' ' 34 i 

' ' 299 
588 
288 
173 
1,091 
1,616 
311 

' ' 471 

564 

506 

1,254 

80 

47 

""429 
557 
1,319 
323 
650 
489 
328 
574 
354 
313 
791 

' ' 3H 

"'845 
629 
375 
571 

' ' 366 

74 

421 

250 

57 

' ' 759 
406 
224 
884 
321 
1,087 
239 
294 
loO 

51 
424 
1,011 
392 
354 
426 
517 
354 
434 

59 
647 
414 
314 
433 
782 


45 
341 
370 
204 
588 
357 
386 
875 
1,616 
282 
178 
471 

'"506 

1,254 
200 
192 
606 
343 
374 

1.319 
323 
327 
492 
*09 
574 
193 
358 
525 
337 
188 
177 
845 

1,299 
752 
571 
217 
357 
114 
465 
326 
167 
481 
435 
759 
406 
305 
884 
505 

1,087 
350 
179 
150 
58 
424 

1,011 
392 
251 
295 
517 
354 
434 
139 
647 
426 
170 
502 
•76 1 


30 


2 Alliston 


341 


3 Almonte 


370 


4 Amherstburg 


299 


5 Arnprior 


588 


6 Aurora 


357 


7 Aylmer 


386 


8 Barrie 


875 


9 Berlin 


1,6*6 


10 Blenheim 


282 


11 Bothwell 


211 


12 Bowmanville 

13 Bracebridge 


350 
490 


14 Brampton 

15 Brockville 


506 
1,254 


16 Bruce Mines 


192 


17 Cache Bay 


192 


18 Carleton Place 


606 


19 Clinton.' 


348 


20 Cobourg 


377 


21 Collingwood 


1,319 


22 Copper Cliff 


323 


25 Cornwall 


529 


24 Deseronto 


492 


25 Dresden 


335 


26 Dundas 


574 


27 Dunnville 


261 


28 Durham 

29 East Toronto 


271 
791 


30 Essex 


176 


31 Forest 


291 


32 Fort Frances 


177 


33 Fort William 


84 ft 


34 Gait 


1,299 


35 Gananoque 


752 


36 Goderich 


571 


37 Gore Bay 


217 


38 Gravenhurst 

39 Haileybury 


417 
93 


40 Hanover 


465 


41 Harriston 


260 


42 Hawkesbury 


167 


43 Hespeler 


481 


44 Huntsville , 


361 


45 Ingersoll 


759 


46 Kincardine , 


406 


47 Kingsville 

48 Kenora 


370 

884 


49 Leamington 


505 


50 Lindsay 

51 Listowel 


1,087 
481 


52 Little Current , 


294 


53 Massey 


150 


54 Mattawa . 


58 


55 Meaford 


424 


56 Midland 


1,011 


57 Milton 


392 


58 Mitchell 


287 


59 Mount Forest 


376 


60 Napanee 


517 


61 New Liskeard 


354 


62 Newmarket 


434 


53 Niagara 


152 


64 North Bay 

65 North Toronto 


647 
426 


66 Oakville 


314 


67 Orangeville 


502 


68 Orillia 1 


872 



190(> 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 



various branches of instruction. — Continued. 



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86 
341 
207 
124 
159 
357 
327 
455 
285 
224 
162 
215 
490 
219 
1,254 
115 
113 
302 
181 
377 
621 
125 
230 
151 
146 
307 
193 
263 
185 
111 
135 

72 
362 
480 
138 
263 
179 
178 

93 
336 
221 

79 
117 
233 
365 
153 
207 
274 
218 
737 
298 

92 
150 

58 
149 
691 
170 
200 
197 
254 
164 
210 
139 
647 
426 
119 
172 
410 


36 

202 

76 

87 

63 

128 

105 

546 

82 

114 

110 

109 

251 

90 

318 

84 

18 

90 

72 

201 

621 

76 

101 

151 

146 

141 

56 

166 

161 

30 

83 

37 

229 

293 

266 

93 

105 

178 

74 

90 

78 

37 

75 

98 

176 

163 

76 

432 

76 

190 

189 

51 

46 

20 

82 1 

195 

136 

150 

104 

254 

78 

80 

63 

127 

176 

73 

217 

416 


36 
202 
110 
124 
159 
128 
197 
584 
285 
191 
110 
215 
251 
219 
270 
115 

66 

212 

287 

268 

1,319 

76 
230 
191 
146 
248 

96 
220 
392 

90 
135 

50 
438 
603 
462 
263 
217 
229 

93 
158 
148 

79 
117 
195 
365 
300 
207 
432 
218 
837 
217 
116 

46 

35 
149 
691 
170 
200 
197 
254 
249 
137 
80 
288 
223 

73 
393 
416 


36 
149 

76 
157 
088 
357 
105 
1,011 
1,616 
158 

60 

471 

700 

247 

1,254 

35 

37 

135 

287 

374 

1,319 

76 
327 
205 

67 
307 
193 
184 
291 
278 
135 

50 

754 

1,040 

545 

571 

15 
209 

13 
277 
250 

79 
117 
264 
759 
406 
354 
561 
505 
514 
189 

39 

46 

35 
424 
691 
392 
105 
376 
254 
354 
434 
139 
647 
130 
170 
393 
422 


70 

341 

370 

98 

588 

357 

386 

1,062 

1,616 

311 

185 

471 

448 
1,254 
195 
113 
824 
429 
557 
1,319 
323 
650 
601 
157 
574 
450 
382 
791 
337 
314 
50 
845 
1,299 
752 
571 

"'.615 
74 
421 
250 
167 
481 


70 
341 
370 


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92 


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46 


55 






3 






4 


13 


29 


29 


21 


21 


3 


21 


13 








5 








6 


288 

281 

1,147 

1,616 

258 

' ' '471 
700 
448 

1.254 
129 
192 
K24 
429 
159 

1,319 
323 
























7 
























8 
























9 




















82 


68 


lit 


60 
77 


66 

77 


66 

77 


41 
53 


32 


"4 


66 

77 


60 






11 








1? 










13 

























14 
























Ifi 
























lfi 


25 


49 

7 


49 
7 


49 


9 




49 

7 










17 


7 


7 






18 












19 
























71' 




















72 


*3ift 


fll 






















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15 


15 


15 








15 


15 


33 






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M 


293 

' ' ' 574 
257 

' ' 79i 
























IB 


50 


79 


79 


56 


26 




79 


50 








76 








27 
























■>s 


39 


112 


112 


58 


50 




112 










?9 










so 
























R1 


314 

"697 

' ' 752 
571 

92 
119 

74 
438 
250 
167 
























Bfl 


22 


22 


18 


11 


11 




17 


17 








R8 








R4 
























85 
























Rfi 
























37 


31 


47 


47 


10 


10 




47 


31 








88 








R9 
























4(1 


26 


43 


44 


41 




42 


44 


26 








41 








47, 
























43 


25 
43 


25 

43 


25 
43 








"36 




25 






44 






45 


759 
406 
370 
884 
505 
1,087 
481 
294 

"*35 

424 
1,011 
380 
354 
426 
517 
354 
434 

' 647 

"*3i4 

502 

689 


759 
406 
370 
884 
505 
618 
481 
294 
150 

"424 












76 


100 


4fi 






















47 


16 


16 


16 


13 






16 


16 








48 












49 
























so 
























Si 


"' 12 
3 
1 






















s? 


12 
3 
3 


12 
3 
1 


12 
















S3 






46 




46 






54 












55 


















Sfi 














70 
30 










57 


392 
354 

426 
517 
354 
434 
211 
647 
585 


50 


69 


69 


25 


25 






39 






58 






59 
























SO 
























>1 


9 


9 


9 








7 










i'2 












S3 
























B4 
























ifi 


12 


12 


12 










12 


12 






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17 


502 
353 
























68 


43 


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*Sewing. 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
II. — Table B.— Number of pupils in the 





Reading. 


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A 
ft 

g 
be 

o 

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6 

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V 

i 

CD 

3 




Towns. 




tfoS 

CO 


M 

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03 

9 

M 

a 


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%i 

« 




a 
o 

& 

a 

o 
u 


69 Oshawa 


1 

216 
296 
112 
118 

91 
367 
192 
255 
108 
264 
102 
254 
193 

70 

98 
110 

97 
146 
116 
101 

59 
506 
295 

70 
120 
301 

92 

70 
146 
112 
104 

72 
107 

40 
112 

81 
420 
1S9 

98 

32 

76 
190 
200 
130 

64 

68 
133 

97 


135 

241 

41 

98 

42 

82 

103 

82 

39 

141 

69 

138 

137 

37 

92 

41 

30 

55 

29 

51 

34 

213 

216 

43 

74 

142 

64 

48 

83 

44 

60 

17 

79 

27 

56 

53 

265 

103 

28 

5 

75 

70 

75 

31 

46 

57 

118 

64 


164 

405 

55 

73 

55 

117 

109 

99 

98 

120 

94 

121 

153 

26 

52 

93 

53 

63 

98 

83 

26 

258 

257 

50 

119 

220 

91 

40 

119 

112 

47 

47 

50 

29 

90 

88 

287 

143 

94 

34 

63 

62 

99 

177 

49 

68 

159 

122 


211 

362 

42 

143 

62 

157 

88 

102 

110 

194 

130 

169 

155 

32 

46 

84 

21 

70 

82 

160 

32 

298 

292 

73 

63 

190 

83 

52 

68 

108 

38 

32 

70 

36 

90 

74 

298 

79 

81 

30 

72 

111 

113 

96 

49 

80 

145 

105 


135 

381 

41 

73 

55 

120 

176 

104 

101 

130 

131 

144 

155 

23 

140 

59 

32 

128 

95 

136 

28 

291 

190 

84 

117 

180 

49 

40 

83 

110 

34 

39 

52 

35 

60 

139 

369 

84 

61 

53 

82 

48 

54 

120 

69 

107 

77 

69 


"52 

"'65 


861 
1,685 
331 
S05 
305 
884 


512 
1,389 
343 
505 
214 
443 
476 
453 
309 
849 
526 
434 
793 
215 
428 
236 
140 
316 
420 
396 
170 
994 
1,250 
320 
493 
1,033 
258 
290 
346 
416 
195 
146 
197 
133 
334 
301 
954 
306 
236 
154 
302 
321 
359 
415 
213 
380 
381 
436 


619 

1,685 

71 

' ' 305 
595 

' ' 391 
456 
849 
526 
826 

' ' 428 
387 
237 
290 
325 
197 

" 1,348 
1,250 
113 
493 
1,033 
379 
290 
252 
486 
211 

' ' 383 
96 
147 
435 

1,639 
465 
362 
101 
368 
511 

' " " '277 

380 
632 
291 


861 
1,148 
343 
289 
305 
458 
668 
386 
309 
849 
526 
826 
793 
108 
428 
387 
237 
316 
420 
82 
100 
1,015 
1,045 
320 
493 
1,033 
414 
290 
310 
459 
135 
157 
147 
127 
240 
435 
1,639 
306 
362 
117 
368 
251 
359 
267 
277 
380 
499 
500 


588 
1,685 




272 


72 Paris 


505 


73 Parkhill 


305 


74 Parry Sound 


749 


75 Pembroke 


668 


76 *Penetanguishene 

77 Perth 


49 

27 

"k 


514 
456 
849 
526 
826 
793 
215 
428 
387 
237 
462 
420 
531 
179 

1,229 

1,250 
320 
493 

1,033 
414 
290 
315 
486 
299 
221 
383 
183 
408 
435 

1,639 
548 
362 
154 
368 
403 
634 
554 
277 
380 
632 


691 

456 




849 


79 Picton 


526 


80 Port Arthur 


826 


81 Port Hope 


793 


82 Powassan 

88 Prescott 


108 
428 




236 




237 


86 Renfrew 


384 




420 


8S St. Mary's 

89 Sandwich 


461 
170 


90 Sarnia 


1,300 


91 SaultSte. Marie 


956 


92 Seaforth 


'"'65 
40 

16 

22 
25 

16 

30 

93 


""iio 


207 


93 Simcoe 

94 Smith's Falls 


180 
1,038 




414 


96 Stayner 


290 




352 


98 Strathroy 


459 


99 Sturgeon Falls 

] 00 Sudburv 


195 
197 


101 Thesselon 


147 


102 Thornburv 


127 


103 Thorold 


240 


104 Tillsonburg 


436 


105 Toronto Junction 

106 Trenton 


1,219 
394 


107 Uxbridge 


362 


108 Vankleek Hill 


154 


109 Walkerton 


368 


110 Walkerville 


408 


Ill Wallaceburg 


359 


1 12 Waterloo 


522 


113 Welland 


277 


114 Whitby 


380 




331 


116 Wingham 


436 






Totals 


16,613 


8,996 


12,011 


12,342 


11,813 


1,485 


59,761 


49,441 


48,763 


52,944 


55,734 






Totals : 
1 Rural Schools 


55,713 

14,505 

16,613 

6,390 


32,588 
9,006 
8,99t 
3,812 


44,188 

13,332 

12,011 

5,005 


47,738 

16,39S 

12,342 

4,982 


45,721 
16,019 
11,813 
4,760 


9,447 
1,891 
1,485 
2,415 


203,083 
65,721 
59,761 
24,473 


159,151 
61,795 
49,441 

22,065 


112,420 
60,195 
48,763 
19,789 


167,396 
61,478 
52,944 
23,336 


169,734 


2 Cities 


63,550 


3 Towns 

4 Villages 


55,734 
22,824 






5 Grand totals, 1905 

6 Grand totals, 1904 


93,221 
91,183 


54,402 
56,391 


74,536 

75,745 


81.46C 
81,58E 


78,313 
76,528 


15,238 
15,382 


353,038 

382,746 


292,452 
'290,618 


241,167 
234,072 

7,095 


305,154 


301,842 
274,447 


7 Increases 


2,038 








1,785 






1,834 


27,395 




1,98$ 


1,209 


12E 


144 


29,70? 
















9 Percentages 


23.48 


13.7C 


IS. 77 


20.61 


19.71 


3.83 


88. 9C 


: 73.63 


60.72 


76.83 


76.00 











♦Including Protestant Separate School. 



HMMi 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



11 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

various branches of instruction. — Concluded. 



5 

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09 461 


135 

553 

193 

73 

117 

185 

176 

182 

101 

130 

261 

826 

463 

50 

186 

59 

36 

198 

177 

249 

60 

284 

362 

109 

117 

180 

84 

132 

139 

254 

50 

61 

77 

87 

83 

435 

667 

84 

61 

83 

154 

78 

260 

175 

69 

107 

77 

209 


135 
743 
138 
158 
117 
275 
284 
272 
144 
324 
355 
826 
463 

82 
238 
143 

57 
198 
177 
316 

60 
621 
758 
157 
180 
180 
167 
132 
350 
363 

88 

93 
147 
112 
150 
435 
954 
122 
142 
154 
302 
189 
260 
267 
118 
187 
222 
314 


135 
1,148 
138 
505 
117 
320 
176 
183 
101 
585 
526 
826 
793 

82 
428 

59 

32 
198 
304 
136 

93 
1,566 
1,035 
109 
493 
180 
132 

92 
381 
486 

72 

39 

77 
112 
240 
213 
1,639 
211 
142 
154 
302 
291 

54 
120 
118 
380 
632 

69 


861 
1,685 
343 
505 
305 
629 


























70 553 


1,685 
























71 272 


40 


52 


52 


52 


52 




302 


40 








72 216 








73 172 


305 
491 
























74 341 


42 


65 


65 


40 


10 


6 


64 


42 








75 373 








76 254 


324 
456 
849 
526 
826 
79S 
215 
428 
387 
237 
462 
420 


267 
456 
849 
526 


19 


49 


35 


30 


33 


7 


35 


35 


30 






77 211 






78 324 
























79 261 
























80 211 
























81 310 


793 
""428 
























82 108 


27 


27 


27 








27 










83 140 
















84 143 
























35 140 


36 

462 
145 


4 

73 


4 


4 






1 


4 


4 








86 261 












87 275 






















88 411 
























89 170 


179 

1,566 

1,110 

207 

493 

1,033 

414 

290 

304 

486 

85 


179 

1,566 

1,041 

320 

493 

1,033 

414 

290 

223 

486 
























90 589 
























91 780 
























92 157 
























93 180 
























94 480 
























95 167 


35 
40 


35 
40 


35 

40 


14 
40 


"8 


14 


35 
40 


35 
40 








96 172 


40 






97 286 






98 218 
























99 88 


16 
14 

3 


16 

22 
25 
16 


16 
22 
25 
16 


12 
22 
















100 197 


2 




22 
25 
16 










101 147 


383 
183 
212 
435 
1,639 
548 
362 
154 


""183 

147 
435 
1,639 
337 
362 
154 


25 

16 


7? 






102 127 


16 










103 240 












104 213 
























105 667 
























106 163 
























107 236 
























108 83 


3 






















109 154 


368 368 






















110 251 


511 

340 
415 
277 
380 
632 
360 


511 


40 

51 


28 
93 


28 
90 


14 
35 








28 








111 359 


20 




93 








112 267 










113 167 


277 
380 
























114 187 
























115 222 




















116 209 




74 


140 


140 


94 


37 




140 




















30,274 


18,625 


29,186 


39,982 


55,588 


43,955 


1,144 


1,442 


1,420 


795 


356 


77 


1,598 


567 


373 


230 


484 


1 118,908 

2 46,569 


72,327 

17,042 

18,625 

9,624 


95,347 
26,770 
29,186 
13,560 


99,309 
51,229 
39,982 
14,331 


163,229 
62,136 
55.588 
22,201 


106,749 
65,765 
43,955 
15,070 


10,395 
3,216 
1,144 

2,272 


8,361 

535 

1,442 

2,345 


7,820 
1,817 
1,420 
2,206 


2,013 


5,065 


206 


4,953 

242 

1,598 


3,969 
903 
567 


22,049 
373 


3,889 
230 


4»2 
2,002 


3 30,274 

4 15,746 


795 
1,409 


356 
844 


77 
73 


484 
172 


5 211,497 

6 274,447 


117,618 
106,116 


164,863 
154,877 


204,851 
191,705 


303,154 


231,539 
229,820 


17,027 
17,356 


12,683 
13,220 


13,263 
13,009 


4,217 


6,265 


356 


8,897 
11,263 


6,788 


35,943 




3,150 














7 


11,502 


9,986 


13,146 


i 


1,719 






254 


















8 62,950 


329 


537 








2,366 












....... 






















9 53.25 


29.61 


41.51 


51.58 


76.33 


58.30 


4.29 


3.19 


3.34 


1.06 


1.58 


.09 








7.9 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



III.— 



THE PUBLIC 

Table C.— Teachers. 





o E 






Salaries. 


Rural Schools. 




c 




|j8 


6 
13 


"3 

a 


ighest 
salary 
paid. 


verage 
salary 
male 
teache 




fc 


3 


f*H 


W 


< 


1 Brant 


70 


13 


57 


$600 


$452 


2 Bruce 


181 

138 

94 


51 
20 
17 


130 
118 

77 


600 
600 
500 


402 


3 Carleton 


397 


4 Duff erin 


373 


5 Dundas 


84 


28 


56 


700 


360 


6 Durham 


108 
119 


23 
33 


85 
86 


525 
600 


385 


7 Elgin 


418 


8 Essex 


120 


31 


89 


600 


440 


9 Frontenac 


146 

77 


20 
12 


126 
65 


500 
550 


299 


10 Glengarry 


350 


11 Grey 


236 


54 


182 


575 


401 


12 Haldimand 


82 


14 


68 


600 


391 


13 Haliburton, N. E. Muskoka, S. Nipis- 












sing and E. Parry Sound 


126 


16 


110 


530 


373 


14 Halton 


59 


14 


45 


525 


403 


15 Hastings 


188 


48 


140 


650 


374 


16 Huron 


193 


70 


123 


500 


402 


17 Kent 


141 


40 


101 


700 


437 


18 Lambton 


176 


35 


141 


600 


402 


19 Lanark 


127 


11 


116 


400 


325 


20 Leeds and Grenville 


236 
118 


37 

15 


199 
103 


500 
500 


319 


21 Lennox and Addington 


306 


22 Lincoln 


65 
192 


23 

49 


42 
143 


500 
550 


411 


23 Middlesex 


413 


24 Norfolk 


105 


27 


78 


550 


369 


25 Northumberland 


107 


38 


69 


600 


397 


26 Ontario 


127 
131 


27 
47 


100 

84 


575 
700 


427 


27 Oxford 


451 


28 Peel 


81 
119 


21 

41 


60 

78 


500 
550 


393 


29 Perth 


432 


Sty Peterborough 


101 


27 


74 


500 


353 




105 


17 


88 


500 


325 


32 Prince Edward 


79 
152 


19 
18 


60 
134 


625 

485 


398 


33 Renfrew 


349 


34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 


285 


88 


197 


675 


421 


35 Stormont 


89 


17 


72 


450 


347 


36 Victoria and S.E. Muskoka 


140 


24 


116 


550 


403 


37 Waterloo 


102 

87 


39 
13 


63 
74 


580 
600 


424 


38 Welland 


413 


39 Wellington 


150 


37 


113 


1,200 


487 


40 Wentworth 


92 


15 


77 


615 


480 


41 York 


188 


52 


136 


900 


466 


42 Algoma and Manitoulin 


130 


28 


102 


650 


354 


43 Nipissing N., etc 


82 


15 


67 


600 


381 


44 Parry Sound W 


113 


16 


97 


450 


357 


45 Rainy River and Thunder Bay 


53 


20 


33 


1,000 


442 


1 Totals, Rural Schools 


5,694 


1,320 


4,374 


1,200 


402 


2 " Cities 


1,335 


194 


1,141 


1,600 


1,003 


3 " Towns 


1,127 


184 


943 


1,200 


746 


4 " Villages 


523 

8,679 


141 

1,839 


382 
• 6,840 


950 


592 


5 Grand totals, 1905 


1,600 


514 


6 " " 19C4 


8,610 
69 


1,957 


6,653 
187 


1,600 


485 


7 Increases 

8 Decreases 




29 




118 

21.19 








9 Percentages 




78.81 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



13 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

Salaries, Certificates, Experience, etc. 



Salaries. 


Number of 
University 
graduates. 


Number of 
teachers who 
have attended 
Normal School 
or Normal Col- 
lege. 


Certificates. 


Average 
salary 
female 
teacher. 


0Q fH fl 

— S 5 C « 

,S-*e c d 


i a cd 

I § B § ° | § 

J- 1 CO O .is O £i CO 
Ph 





1 , oJ 

t-TJ J£-G 


1 $350 

2 328 




41 
63 
72 
26 
24 
42 
44 
36 
22 
13 
70 
31 


9 
3 

10 
2 
1 
5 
9 
3 
1 


34 
60 
62 
24 
23 
37 
35 
34 
21 
13 
61 
29 

7 
24 
47 
67 
60 
76 
27 
37 
18 
27 
93 
37 
43 
48 
60 
35 
54 
29 
10 
19 
10 
55 
10 
34 
44 
25 
63 
41 
113 
18 
11 

6 
12 




27 




1 


103 


3 330 




58 


4 321 




\ • • 

1 


68 


5 301 




57 


6 327 




66 


7 329 






75 


8 342 

9 250 


1 
1 

1 


3 


60 

72 


10 278 




49 


11 326 


8 
3 


2 

1 


141 


12 320 

13 257 


1 


50 
23 


14 339 




25 
49 
70 
66 
80 
27 
39 
21 
31 
97 
38 
44 
48 
67 
36 
55 
29 

9 
20 
11 
49 
14 
35 
46 
34 
69 
57 
117 
19 
12 

6 
13 


1 
2 

4 
5 
4 


34 


15 303 




1 


82 


16 329 




119 


17 366 






71 


18 345 






82 


19 263 


1 


1 


84 


20 268 


2 
3 
3 
5 
1 
2 


176 


21 263 

22 303 


1 


1 
1 


70 
31 


23 341 


1 


92 


24 322 




56 


25 310 




1 


60 


26 328 




77 


27 340 




7 
1 
1 


1 


62 


28 329 




45 


29 339 


1 




64 


30 289 




43 


31 264 








41 


32 305 


1 


2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
5 
6 
16 
5 
1 
1 




53 


33 278 




83 


34 308 




1 
1 


175 


35 293 




63 


36 296 




58 


37 341 




1 
2 


50 


38 316 

39 346 


1 
1 


51 

72 


40 339 




35 


41 336 




2 

2 


68 


42 321 

43 284 


1 


18 
10 


44 257 






13 


45 376 




1 




17 










1 311 

2 503 

3 344 

4 316 


12 
33 

22 
10 


1,817 

1,292 

928 

405 


143 

272 
162 

72 


1,693 

1,024 

802 

333 


23 

11 

20 

8 


2,904 

28 

109 

95 


5 348 

6 335 


77 
86 


4,442 
4,564 


649 
625 


3,852 
4,032 


62 
59 


3,136 

3,288 


7 13 






24 




3 




8 


9 


122 


180 


152 


9 


.88 


51.18 


7.48 


44.38 


.72 


36.13 



14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
J II.— Table C— Teachers, 



Rural Schools. 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

1 2 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, N.E. Muskoka,S. Nipis- 

eing and E. Parry Sound 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville 

21 Lennox and Addington 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell 

32 Prince Edward 

33 Renfrew « 

34. Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S.E. Muskoka 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Algoma and Manitoulin 

43 Nipissing, N., etc 

44 Parry Sound W 

45 Rainy River and Thunder Bay 



Certificates. — Con. 



1 Totals, Rural Schools. 

2 " Cities 

3 " Towns 

4 " Villages 

5 Grand totals, 1905.... 

6 " " 1904.... 

7 Increases 

8 Decreases 

it Percentages 



7 

10 
5 
4 



55 



25 



2 
1 

12 
2 
3 



10 

49 



29 

42 

8 

21 

2 

9. 



46 
19 
49 

7 



412 



19 

I 1 



442 



S-t 

o 

a 

H 



13 
42 
10 
20 



40 



5.09 



31 

3 

5 

12 

14 

9 

24 



2 

10 
1 
2 

1 



19 
5 
5 

29 
9 
4 

26 
2 
2 
9 



45 
41 
45 

16 



519 



15 

4 

538 

360 



Experience. 



<~ a Z $ £ 

a1.§£tj 




10 

13 

2 

2 

5 

3 

13 

10 

3 

14 



26 

4 

21 

11 

15 

10 

3 

8 

15 

3 

4 

2 

7 

13 
2 
2 
1 

14 
9 
1 
4 

18 
1 
7 

11 
8 

11 
5 
7 

23 

13 

21 
3 



384 
37 
21 
16 



458 



hi)? 



5^ 88 



5.28 



10 
55 
21 

18 
16 
25 
31 
30 
45 
21 
47 
16 

27 
10 
29 
46 
28 
43 
22 
58 
29 
14 
45 
18 
23 
20 
30 
18 
25 
15 
26 
14 
29 
59 
20 
25 
15 
16 
25 
20 
38 
28 
14 
21 
10 



1,195 
64 
32 
35 



1,326 



15.28 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



15 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

Salaries, Certificates, Experience, etc. — Concluded. 



Experience. 





■*!■ +J 


4-1 +J 


.(_, 


Average ex- 
perience in 
years of 
male 
teachers. 






jz "£ **- 


A s 


A 3 


A 


o>«*h 


9«h n 


No. who 
have taug 
4 years bi 
less than 


O a 5? 2 


r, 3 CC g 

© ca «- 5 
j? 0) <f *- 


B tc t; 
o * O C 


© o 

fl QQ CD 

fl} 0> C „ S 

^ v - c * 

> * C Cv CL> 

j 1) ,,H M-l ■*-< 


C3 a* * 4) 

9 *V~ 
> <*5 c •— 


1 10 


10 


11 


2 


11 


5 


6 


2 31 


23 


7 


2 


4 


4 


4 


3 35 


23 


6 


1 


4 


4 


4 


4 18 


13 


1 


1 


4 


4 


4 


5 8 


14 


3 


3 


6 


4 


5 


6 23 


13 


8 


2 


5 


4 


4 


7 16 


15 


5 


3 


6 


3 


4 


8 16 


10 


10 


10 


10 


5 


6 


9 27 


12 


4 


1 


5 


3 


3 


10 13 


12 


5 


5 


8 


5 


6 


11 49 


21 


7 


10 


8 


3 


4 


12 18 


14 


3 


1 


5 


4 


4 


1 3 3 1 


9 

5 


1 
6 




4 
6 


3 

5- 


3 


14 18 


2 


5 


15 37 


29 


9 


5 


8 


4 


5 


16 24 


25 


7 


10 


7 


3 


4 


17 34 


17 


5 


5 


6 


4 


5 


18 32 


23 


8 


4 


4 


4 


4 


19 36. 


21 


9 


1 


6 


5 


5 


20 42 


23 


18 


1 


4 


4 


4 


21 27 


14 


4 


3 


5 


4 


4 


22 10 


10 


3 


o 


8 


5 


6 


23 37 


21 


19 


4 


6 


4 


5 


24 25 


18 


7 


3 


7 


4 


5 


25 21 


16 


5 


5 


6 


5 


5 


26 33 


17 


9 


5 


5 


4 


5 


27 21 


18 


12 


8 


9 


4 


6 


28 13 


10 


6 


3 


7 


4 


5 


29 22 


17 


6 


7 


8 


4 


5 


30 19 


11 


7 


3 


6 


4 


4 


31 29 


12 


5 


1 


2 


4 


4 


32 13 


13 


6 


3 


7 


5 


5 


33 37 


29 


5 


2 


7 


4 


4 


34 60 


20 


16 


9 


7 ' 


3 


4 


35 20 


10 


6 


2 


5 


4 


5 


36 27 


26 


7 


5 


8 


4 


5 


37 23 


11 


11 


4 


8 


4 


6 


38 23 


13 


4 


4 


10 


4 


5 


39 30 


22 


13 


6 


8 


4 


5 


40 22 


15 


8 


3 


15 


4 


6 


41 43 


21 


27 


13 


10 


5 


6 


42 27 


14 


2 


4 


6 


3 


4 


43 15 


12 


4 


2 


7 


4 


4 


44 17 


15 


4 


1 


4 


4 


4 


45 6 


13 


5 


2 


7 


4 


6 


1 1,138 


730 


334 


176 


6.9 


4.1 


4.7 


2 218 


264 


360 


295 


14.8 


11.9 


12.4 


3 235 


300 


243 


169 


17.1 


10.1 


11.3 


4 120 


111 


79 


61 


13.4 


7.5 


9.1 


5 1,711 

6 

7 


1,405 


1,016 


701 


9.3 


6.4 


7.0 


8 

9 19.71 


16.19 


11.71 


8.07 


















16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 



IV.— Table D.— School 





School Houses. 


School Visits. 


Totals. 


'o 
o 

m 

"o 

u 


M 


G 
O 

m 


a3 

s 


bio 

o 


o 

■+3 

c 

<0 

m 

pq 


03 

H 
>> 

PQ 


s 

O 

pq 


fl 
O 

e 

Ph 

S-, 

■+j 

O 
>> 
pq 


O 

H 


1 Rural Schools 


5,214 


2,271 


491 


2,218 


234 


10,207 


5,833 


3,105 


16,878 


36,023 

18,487 
7,431 
6,217 


2 Cities 


179 


"158 


17 


4 




3,381 


1,977 


583 


12,546 


3 Towns 


246 


165 


27 


54 




1,916 


1,980 


373 


3,162 
4,342 


4 Villages 


154 


126 


12 


16 




835 


717 


323 




5 Grand Totals, 1905 


5,793 


2,720 


547 


2,292 


234 


16,339 


10,507 


4,384 


36,928 


68,158 


6 Grand Totals, 1904 


5,758 


2,659 


465 


2,348 


286 


15,677 


10,181 


3,856 


36,439 


66,153 


7 Increases 


35 


61 


82 






662 


326 


528 


489 


2,005 


8 Decreases 








56 


52! 


























54.18 




9 Percentages 




46.95 


9.44 


39.57' 


4.04 


23.97 


15.42 


6.431 















* In addition, there were set out 15,291 flowers and plants in the City of Toronto. 
t To each school. 



VMM 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



17 



SCHOOLS. — Continued. 



Houses, Pravers. etc. 



Maps & Globes. 





DQ 


Bh 


0) 


OS 


C 

3 


U-t 


«M 


O 


o 


Jh 


;-, 


<v 


a> 


X2 


-O 


s 


5 


B 


3 


fc 


fc 



Examinations. 
Prizes. 



CD 

1.2 • 
k q.g 

<^'rB a 

S 2 * 

3-B a* 



44,664j 4,479 



6,542 
2,747 

1,823 



m 

o.S . 

O h OD 

o 



00 






284 
327 
119 



1,987 

105 

69 

52 



55,776 
55,897 


5,209 2,213 
5,498; 2,324 








121 


289 


111 









f9.63< f .9| 38.37 



Lectures. 









?.s 



b c 
3 ° 



SI 

.£ 
o ~ 

OCO 

°.S2 S) 



a "B * 
s 5 a> 

3 oj ^ 



639 654 

114 9 50 59 

19 98 68 166 

22 66 79 145 



104 758| 5,947 

*6 

37 

187 



794 827 301 1,128 6.177 
724| 947! 354 ^30] 5,552 



120 



13.7 73.32 



53 173 



26.68 



625 



T3 

a> 

B ^ 

B- >» 
O o3 

§1 

CO * 



2 * 

B O 



o 
o 

-B 

w 

CO 

02 

3~ 



2,864 5,003 

48 1 76 

101 236 

80 139 



2,325 

164 

148 

67 



170 



118 



53.4 



95.53 



L6' 



.§§ 



GO 



8.s 

o'.Sj 



B ^ 
» B 



1,247 

5 

22 

26 



3,093 5,554 2,704 1,300 
3,211 5,384 2,537 1,039 



261 



46.67 22.44 



2 E. 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 

V.— Table E.— 



Counties 

(including incorporated villages, 

but not cities or towns), etc. 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Durham 

7 Elgin 

8 Essex 

9 Frontenac 

10 Glengarry 

11 Grey 

12 Haldimand 

13 Haliburton, etc 

14 Halton 

15 Hastings 

16 Huron 

17 Kent 

18 Lambton 

19 Lanark 

20 Leeds and Grenville 

21 Lennox and Addington 

22 Lincoln 

23 Middlesex 

24 Norfolk 

25 Northumberland 

26 Ontario 

27 Oxford 

28 Peel 

29 Perth 

30 Peterborough 

31 Prescott and Russell 

32 Prince Edwa.d 

33 Renfrew 

34 Simcoe and W. Muskoka 

35 Stormont 

36 Victoria and S. E. Muskoka . . . 

37 Waterloo 

38 Welland 

39 Wellington 

40 Wentworth 

41 York 

42 Algoma and Manitoulin 

43 Nipissing, N . , etc 

44 Parry Sound, W 

45 Rainy River and Thunder Bay. 

46 Albany and Moose Fort 



Receipts. 



Legislative 
grants. 



Totals 

Totals Incorporated Villages. 

Totals Rural Schools 



2 a E. 



$ 
2,334 
7,570 
5,397 
3,207 
3,407 
3,075 
5,144 
4,258 
4,435 
2,702 
7,976 
3,086 

11,949 
2,811 
8,358 
8,264 
6,514 
7,308 
4,115 
7,342 
3,579 
3,085 
7,099 
3,791 
4,080 
5,603 
5,040 
2,834 
4,351 
4,354 
3,737 
2,373 
7,003 

15,854 
2,955 
8,458 
4,179 
3,324 
6,541 
3,724 
7,724 

15,064 
8,815 

10,804 

5,865 

200 



c. 

97 

30 

17 

23 j 

72 

50 

82 

90 

00 

50 

06 

59 \ 

15 

41 

02 

16 

25 

03 

00 

19 

94 

72 

06 

68 

00 

75 

80 

60 

00 

61 

23 

50 

82 

78 

17 

11 

61 

00 

27 

90 

95 

00 

00 

50 

00 

00 



259,705 97 
20,545 83 

239,160 14 



Municipal 
grants and 
assessments. 



$ 
30,070 
94,124 
69,423 
45,978 
42,269 
47,190 
56,166 
54,551 
42,404 
27,744 

106,476 
38,595 
26,947 
28,773 
79,395 
94,181 
69,362 
90,511 
39,051 
90,309 
35,982 
38,779 
91,261 
45,714 
51,615 
59,225 
65,246 
37,393 
56,878 
39,446 
38,484 
29,645 
52,580 

118,997 
32,439 
56,121 
53,770 
37,708 
82,272 
42,484 

107,293 
41,102 
23,088 
24,809 
24,161 



Clergy Reserve 

Fund, balances 

and other 



2,460,033 74 
248,565 68 



2,211,468 06 



$ 
22,969 
51,192 
22,002 
23,697 
12,113 
22,796 
34,286 
25,345 
15,683 
15,181 
58,002 
19,413 
13,693 
17,737 
28,786 
44,822 
47,135 
37,351 
15,457 
35,697 
15,866 
31,891 
44,916 
29,400 
23,069 
26,257 
49,038 
19,724 
24,407 
13,428 
16,162 
15,839 
17,676 
65,340 
7,088 
19,090 
57,862 
22,352 
56,509 
34,091 
77,831 
24,989 
8,704 
8,451 
6,890 



Total receipts 

for all 

Public School 

purposes. 



1,280,247 47 
133,638 25 



% c 
55,37546 
152,887 14 
96,822 60 
72,883 74 
57,791 03 
73,063 01 
95,597 05 

84. 155 77 
62,523 27 
45.628 01 

172,455 44 
61,095 29 
52,589 68 
49,322 61 

116,539 43 

147,268 42 

123,012 13 

135,171 12 
58,623 86 

133,349 15 
55,429 21 
73,756 94 

143,277 34 
78,906 62 
78,764 79 
91,086 63 

119,325 94 
59,953 04 
85,636 31 
57,228 88 
58,384 09 
47,858 01 
77,261 04 

200,192 91 
42,482 31 
83,670 17 

115,812 34 
63,384 80 

145,323 02 
80,301 25 

192,850 36 

81.156 09 
40,607 80 
44,065 79 
36,917 29 

200 00 



3,999,987 18 
402,749 76 



1,146,609 22 



3,597,237 41 



imm; 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



19 



SCHOOL?.— Continued. 
Financial Statement. 



Expenditure. 



Teachers' 
salaries. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40. 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 



$ c. 
25,923 86 
75,308 23 
50,106 11 
34,313 31 
35,136 92 
38,606 45 
45,804 34 
41,763 06 
35,591 30 
24,553 90 
83,826 72 
32,020 47 
30,060 32 
27,373 85 
64,414 99 
79,808 01 
55,658 47 
73,064 39 
35,405 29 
74,019 47 
32,418 78 
29,050 55 
73,259 61 
39,784 40 
42,237 78 
49,520 10 
82,731 33 
30,781 02 
45,641 44 
34,312 20 
32,063 22 
26,482 30 
44,248 66 
101,280 21 
27,226 53 
48,289 23 
44,505 59 
34,808 03 
67,055 06 
35,255 57 
78,936 59 
37,747 26 
19,726 45 
26,752 71 
19,154 63 

200 00 



2,066,228 71 
201,877 25 



1,864,351 46 



Sites and 


building school 


houses. 


$ e. 


555 78 


12,582 47 


14,866 71 


6,663 92 


1,948 14 


5,361 27 


2,249 47 


3,648 13 


2,105 71 


5,544 66 


22,605 40 


1,559 71 


4,715 65 


921 55 


9,311 73 


10,654 00 


3,036 61 


4,680 74 


1,372 53 


12,545 43 


1,455 63 


15,965 21 


2,398 10 


724 73 


1,670 64 


1,570 22 


7,235 20 


2,564 62 


2,401 30 


2,713 41 


3,807 41 


4,644 13 


6,216 44 


18,416 20 


4,001 55 


3,205 02 


8,321 14 


1,530 98 


12,926 89 


5,424 96 


19,933 98 


9,488 67 


5,838 60 


2,401 37 


5,023 14 



276,809 23 
62,411 22 



214,398 01 



Libraries, 
maps, appar- 
atus, prizes & 
school books. 



Rent and 

repairs, fuel 

and other 

expenses. 



$ 

688 

1,379 

1,399 

1,797 

450 

287 

1,150 

618 

700 

145 

2,385 

138 

671 

566 

2,896 

1,200 

1,164 

1,685 

303 

1,979 

527 

951 

1,188 

444 

936 

953 

1,030 

503 

814 

1,156 

691 

306 

1,259 

3,267 

161 

1,170 

445 

561 

2,574 

749 

2,366 

1,150 

840 

420 

698 



c. 
18 
57 
01 
24 
68 
97 
99 
41 
91 
43 
29 
54 
51 
63 
40 
94 
97 
86 
52 
28 
30 
52 
21 
85 
42 
34 
09 
86 
44 
33 
36 
91 
34 
63 
95 
33 
74 
14 
04 
08 
21 
49 
21 
91 
90 



46,781 93 
4,561 09 



$ c. 

9,706 65 
26,659 85 
19,318 51 
15,254 47 
10,756 77 
12,162 47 
18,342 27 
16,610 32 
10,043 50 

6,875 09 
32,838 11 

9,874 05 

8,632 80 
10,492 99 
17,973 49 
25,878 81 
17,788 06 
24,210 13 

7,732 42 
21,279 87 

8,812 47 
10,697 29 
26,385 74 

9,961 09 
14,721 81 
19,496 53 
19,019 23 
14,045 88 
16,728 24 

9,045 15 
10,227 28 

7,474 78 
12,351 29 
31,401 26 

5,961 58 
16,168 55 
15,689 89 

9,283 75 
28,058 48 
12,588 52 
39,833 53 
15,978 48 

7,936 36 

8,722 29 

6,946 92 



Total expendi- 
ture for all 
Public School 
purposes. 



Balances, 



42,220 84 



699,967 02 
76,355 16 

623,611 86 



$ 
36,874 

115,930 
85,690 
58,028 
48,292 
56,418 
67,547 
62,639 
48,441 
37,119 

141,655 
43,592 
44,080 
39,355 
94,596 

117,541 
77,648 

103,641 
44,813 

109,824 
43,214 
56,664 

103,231 
50,915 
59,566 
71,540 

110,015 
47,895 
65,585 
47,227 
46,789 
38,908 
64,075 

154,365 
37,351 
68,833 
68,962 
46,183 

110,614 
54,018 

141,070 
64,364 
34,341 
38,297 
31,823 
200 



c. 
47 
12 
34 
94 
51 
16 
07 
92 
42 
08 
52 
77 
28 
02 
61 
76 
11 
12 
76 
05 
18 
57 
66 
07 
65 
19 
85 
38 
50 
09 
27 
12 
73 
30 
61 
13 
36 
90 
47 
13 
31 
90 
62 
28 
59 
00 



$ c. 
18,500 99 
36,957 02 
11,132 26 
14,854 80 

9,498 52 
16,644 85 

28.049 98 
21,515 85 
14,081 85 

8.508 93 
30,799 92 
17,502 52 

8.509 40 
9,967 59 

21,942 82 
29,726 6(5 
45,364 02 
31,530 00 
13,810 10 
23,525 10 
12,215 03 
17,092 37 
40,045 68 
27,991 55 
19,198 14 
19,546 44 
9,310 09 
12,057 66 

20.050 81 
10,001 79 
11,594 82 

8,949 89 

13,185 31 

45,827 61 

5,130 70 

14,837 04 

46,849 98 

17,200 90 

34,708 55 

26,283 12 

51,780 05 

16,791 19 

6,266 18 

5,768 51 

5,093 70 



3,089,786 89 
345,204 72 



910,200 29 
57,545 04 



2,744,582 17 



852,655 25 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
V.— Table E.— 



Cities. 



1 Belleville .... 

2 Brantford .... 
8 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton .... 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Niagara Falls. 

9 Ottawa 

10 Peterborough. 

11 St. Catharines 

12 St. Thomas... 

13 Stratford 

14 Toronto 

15 Windsor 

16 Woodstock . .. 



Totals. 



Towns. 



1 Alexandria . . . 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg . . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Barrie 

9 Berlin 

10 Blenheim .... 

11 Bothwell 

12 Bowmanville . 

13 Bracebridge . . . 

14 Brampton .... 

15 Brockville 

16 Bruce Mines . . 

17 Cache Bay.... 

18 Carle ton Place 

19 Clinton 

20 Cobourg 

21 Collingwood. . . 

22 Copper Cliff.. 

23 Cornwall 

24 Deseronto 

25 Dresden 

26 Dundas 

27 Dunn vi lie 

28 Durham 

29 East Toronto . . 

30 Essex 



Receipts. 



Legislative 
grants. 



Municipal 
grants and 
assessments. 



$ c. 

880 00 

2,626 99 

1,321 62 

2,114 73 

*7,698 13 

2,270 72 

|6,947 35 

824 00 

*5,856 44 

1,448 03 

1,199 00 

1,657 00 

*1,891 94 

'31,850 15 

1,544 00 

1,365 00 



71,495 10 



62 00 
356 00 
262 00 
223 00 
277 00 
203 00 
282 69 
819 00 
,417 67 
282 00 
197 00 
340 00 
,445 00 
505 00 
,395 00 
298 00 

75 00 
490 00 
422 00 
392 14 
821 00 
366 00 
754 60 
418 00 
422 00 
343 00 
264 00 
611 00 
377 00 
172 00 



$ 
12,101 
40,825 
27,247 
23,946 

126,943 
28,686 

103,994 
11,400 

207,426 
24,000 
15,873 
24,943 
18,500 

731,836 
26,808 
15,250 



c. 
74 
00 
74 
25 
57 
00 
12 
00 
00 
00 
00 
82 
00 
50 
92 
00 



1,439,782 66 



1,041 
4,950 
4,117 
3,066 
4,079 
2,500 
4,657 

12,111 

21,932 
4,114 
955 
4,600 
6,550 
5,200 

15,600 
1,968 
145 
5,050 
3,200 
6,640 

14,600 
3,981 
6,150 
5,837 
3,150 
5,300 
3,801* 
3,419 
6,759 
1 



90 
00 
02 
82 
00 
00 
00 
36 
01 
63 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
76 
00 
00 
00 
00 
45 
00 
36 
00 
00 
00 
25 
97 
95 



Clergy Reserve 

Fund, balances 

and other 



$ c. 

594 92 

3,936 49 

1,048 31 

625 10 

18,758 21 

2,024 93 

652 63 

879 49 

7,982 28 

8,092 40 

237 24 

344 02 

19,519 08 

17,211 02 

2,601 73 

2,196 36 



Tota receipts 

for all 

Public School 

purpose* . 



),704 21 



I c. 
13,576 66 
47,388 48 
29,617 67 
26,686 08 

153,399 91 
32,981 65 

111,594 10 
13,103 49 

221,264 72 
33,540 43 
17,309 24 
26,944 84 
39,911 02 

780,897 67 
30,954 65 
18,811 36 



815 
627 

1,240 
946 

2,703 
762 

2,918 

2,428 
98 
461 
846 
180 
781 
384 
639 
14 

2,068 
775 
458 
585 
429 
979 
976 
477 
385 
143 

9,652 

1,587 
222 

6,573 



32 
97 
05 
53 

39 
11 

32 
37 
97 
07 
12 
40 
01 
38 
18 
24 
20 
60 
51 
95 
19 
61 
90 
65 
05 
69 
84 
38 
77 
27 



1,597,981 97 



1,919 22 
5,933 97 
5,619 07 
4,236 35 
7,059 39 
3,465 11 
7,858 01 

15,358 73 

23,448 65 
4,857 70 
1,998 12 
5,120 40 
8,776 01 
6,089 38 

17,634 18 
2,280 24 
2,288 96 
6,315 60 
4,080 51 
7,618 09 

15,850 19 
5,327 06 
7,881 50 
6,733 01 
3,957 05 
5,786 69 

13,716 84 
5,617 63 
7,359 74 
6,747 22 



Grant for Technical Education included. f Including grant to Normal School. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



21 



SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
Financial Statement. — Cont inued. 



Expenditure. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
.7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 



Teachers' 
salaries . 



$ c. 
9,203 62 
22,880 78 
14,265 29 
16,664 03 
81,688 33 
21,190 38 
72,994 70 
8,027 25 
84,377 99 
18,515 88 
10,520 40 
19,391 67 
14,558 00 
451,428 00 
20,724 50 
12,833 40 



879,264 22 



817 
2,759 
3,670 
3,025 
3,931 
2,391 
3,284 
9,420 

15,593 
3,036 
1,683 
3,750 
4,933 
4,160 

10,033 
1,650 
757 
4,412 
2,980 
4,647 
9,832 
2,931 
5,530 
5,022 
3,077 
4,430 
2,679 
3,891 
5,075 
2,365 



Sites and 

building school 

houses. 



Libraries, 
maps, appar- 
tus, prizes, & 
school books. 



4,535 93 
6,779 07 

9*320 47 

"5, 083 '81 

250 00 

75,789 59 

13 95 

200 00 

' 15,812*47 

138,680 87 

309 64 



256,775 80 



* c. 
2,269 33 

'25261 

6,708 38 
1,547 62 

172 00 

76 15 

5,000 21 

2,565 50 

433 59 

i',849*8i 

5,517 91 

190 54 

1,127 58 



Rent and 

repairs, fuel 

and other 

expenses. 



27,711 23 



22 35 




2,000 00 






114 56 












866 63 

1,290 15 

106 94 

353 63 


93 93 

184 13 

1,136 59 

84 00 

26 51 




14 85 


211 33 

280 00 


82 79 
















7 50 








367 92 


13 95 


88 00 
321 93 








99 33 






8,508 40 


1,424 95 
83 33 




55 52» 


3,117 25 





$ 

3,791 

17,702 
7,798 
9,769 

54,852 
9,526 

31,371 

4,432 

* 36,917 

12,445 
5,410 
6,214 
7,690 
176,816 
8,343 
4,311 



397,395 12 



866 

856 
1,641 
1,059 
1,113 

958 
3,148 
3,327 
6,570 
1,076 

287 
1,370 
3,798 
1,068 
6,305 

584 
1,531 
1,862 

932 
2,970 
4,959 
1,675 
2,029 
1,563 

723 
1,142 

999 
1,642 
1,794 
1,023 



Total expendi- 
ture for ail 

Public School 
purposes. 



$ c. 
12,994 64 
47,388 48 
28,842 92 
26,686 08 

152,569 91 
32,264 32 

109,622 48 
12,785 99 

202,085 21 
33,540 43 
16,564 21 
25,606 26 
39,911 02 

772,443 76 
29,567 70 
18,272 96 



1,561,146 37 



1,706 40 

5.616 18 
5,312 33 
4,199 33 
5,045 06 
3,350 64 
7,393 50 

14,221 69 

23,407 78 
4,550 91 
1,998 12 
5,120 40 
8,746 29 
5,523 91 

16,619 16 
2,234 78 
2,288 96 
6,274 97 
3,920 82 
7,618 09 

15,159 48 
4,708 92 
7,881 50 
6,586 40 
3,899 99 
5,573 20 

13,611 71 

5.617 63 
6,925 21 
6,506 43 



Balances. 



¥ c. 
582 02 



774 75 



830 00 

717 33 

1,971 62 

317 50 

19,179 51 

"745 03 
1,338 58 

8,453 9i 
1,386 95 

538 40 



36,835 60 



212 82 

317 79 

306 74 

37 02 

2,014 33 
114 47 
464 51 

1,137 04 

40 87 

306 79 



29 72 

565 47 

1,015 02 

45 46 



40 63 
159 69 



690 71 
618 14 



146 61 

57 06 

213 49 

105 13 



434 53 

240 79 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
V.— Table E.— 



Towns. 



31 Forest 

32 Fort Frances 

33 Fort William 

34 Gait 

35 Gananoque 

36 Goderich 

37 Gore Bay 

38 Gravenhurst 

39 Haileybury 

40 Hanover 

41 Harriston 

42 Hawkesbury 

43 Hespeler 

44 Huntsville 

45 Ingersoll 

46 Kincardine 

47 Kingsville 

48 Kenora 

49 Leamington 

50 Lindsay , . 

51 Listowel 

52 Little Current 

53 Massey 

54 Mattawa 

55 Meaford 

56 Midland 

57 Milton 

58 Mitchell 

59 Mount Forest 

60 Napanee 

61 New Liskeard 

62 Newmarket 

63 Niagara 

64 North Bay 

65 North Toronto . . . 

66 Oakville 

67 Orangeville 

68 Orillia 

69 Oshawa 

70 Owen Sound 

71 Palmerston 

72 Paris 

73 Parkhill 

74 Parry Sound 

75 Pembroke 

76 " x "Penetanguishene 

77 Perth 

78 Petrolea 

79 Picton 

80 Port Arthur 

81 Port Hope 





Receipts. 






Municipal 

grants and 

assessments. 


Clergy Reserve 


Total receipts 


Legislative 


fund, balances 


for all Public 


grants. 


and other 


School pur- 






sources. 


poses. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


c. 


$ c. 


342 00 


2,500 00 


879 74 


3,721 74 


151 00 


2,381 50 


81 16 


2,613 66 


594 00 


13,800 00 


12,000 00 


26,394 00 


981 69 


26,000 00 


197 04 


27,178 73 


610 00 


6,934 60 


235 60 


7,780 20 


573 00 


6,665 73 


290 75 


7,529 48 


58^ 00 


4,315 80 


242 32 


5,145 12 


269 00 


4,660 00 
875 00 




4,929 00 


60 00 


699 00 


1,634 00 


332 00 


3,800 00 


7,690 45 


11,822 45 


210 00 


2,640 00 


287 94 


3,137 94 


64 00 


2,800 00 


836 59 


3,700 59 


297 14 


5,107 38 


71 65 


5,476 17 


465 00 


12,000 00 


741 24 


13,206 24 


696 75 


7,513 83 


413 17 


8,623 75 


444 00 


3,370 00 


483 01 


4,297 01 


219 00 


3,527 40 


243 35 


3,989 75 


440 00 


9,000 00 


1,221 49 


10,661 49 


316 00 


4,318 00 


521 68 


5,155 68 


788 00 


11,162 03 


1,221 84 


13,171 87 


313 01 


4,909 00 


481 07 


5,703 08 


170 00 


1,843 00 


731 46 


2,744 46 


70 00 


950 14 


78 48 


1,098 62 


25 00 


1,000 00 


65 39 


1,090 39 


426 00 


4,074 00 


220 00 


4,720 00 


459 00 


7,718 00 


418 49 


8,593 49 


524 00 


2,391 27 


1,080 30 


3,995 57 


229 00 


2,771 00 


89 95 


3,089 95 


418 00 


3,654 00 


765 27 


4,837 27 


495 00 


4,950 00 


943 64 


6,388 64 


144 00 


1,500 00 


10,055 20 


11,699 20 


41 i 00 


4,575 00 


309 03 


5,295 03 


177 00 


2,000 11 


250 89 


2,428 00 


271 00 


6,789 00 


6,500 12 


13,560 12 


285 00 


5,934 72 


126 67 


6,346 39 


189 00 


3,080 00 


46 39 


3,315 39 


441 00 


5,955 00 


86 79 


6,482 79 


488 00 


9,800 00 


6,543 39 


16,831 39 


518 00 


7,100 00 


506 60 


8,124 60 


1,282 37 


14,851 00 


2,249 39 


18,382 76 


422 00 


3.600 00 


247 54 


4,269 54 


380 00 


5,300 00 


40 36 


5,720 36 


137 00 


1,738 00 


386 82 


2,261 82 


1,032 00 


6,730 50 


337 22 


8,099 72 


357 00 


6,082 23 
4,403 38 




6,439 23 


324 00 


304 45 


5,031 83 


449 00 


4,292 49 


276 18 


5,017 67 


456 00* 


9,000 00 


158 11 


9,614 11 


551 59 


5,650 00 


4,271 84 


10,473 43 


869 00 


13,278 24 


1,316 40 


15,463 64 


648 00 


7,000 00 


552 90 


8,200 90 



* Including Protestant Separate School. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



23 



SCHOOLS.-- ConiiwnL 
Financial Statement. — Continued. 



Expenditure. 



Teachers' 
salaries. 



31 
32 
33 

34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
.42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
6'1 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 



% c. 

2,665 00 
1,760 00 
6,103 60 
11,746 11 
5,181 81 
4,461 54 
2,028 75 

3.589 74 
787 65 

2,887 45 
2,030 00 
1,339 92 
3,626 51 
3,394 27 
5,729 50 
3,149 00 
2,870 90 
7,089 85 
3,236 75 
9,630 77 
3,217 66 
1,336 00 
820 00 
819 00 
3,962 09 
6,037 86 
3,035 55 
2,675 10 
3,404 50 
4,489 92 
1,628 06 
2,979 00 
1,300 00 
3,519 70 
3,953 17 
2,275 00 
4,100 41 
6.994 45 
5,403 98 
13,043 00 
2,985 00 
3,976 50 

1.590 36 
5,534 00 
3,924 67 
3,528 67 
3,637 00 
5,503 35 
4,147 36 
7,159 62 
6,402 06 



Sites and 

building school 

houses. 



12,000 00 
10,414 45 



1,129 60 

1,887 19 

96 74 

6 05 

6,354 50 



•,578 27 



5,202 50 

460 43 

67 00 



1 10 

980 20 



47 91 

1,223 66 

270 35 



10 55 

5,598 96 



Libraries, 

maps, 

apparatus, 

prizes and 

school books. 



96 24 
418 26 
32 28 
30 93 
157 66 
91 48 
88 99 



194 66 



8 80 
14 02 

16 10 
20 00 

244 82 

222 82 

184 32 

7 94 

55 50 

51 30 

17 05 
250 81 

19 95 



40 00 
69 55 



Rent and 

repairs, fuel 

and other 

expenses. 



500 00 








8,832 68 


579 60 
345 88 








31 25 


717 63 




938 63 


15 25 




12 76 




78 60 


36 69 














47 53 






24 68 


26 29 



4 04 

595 45 

12 25 



$ ( 

703 
472 

7,789 
4,985 
2,457 
1,780 

631 
1.0S5 

808 
2,187 

840 

978 
1,617 

227 
2,245 
1,144 
1,010 
2,741 

922 
3,541 
2,472 

634 

198 

271 

750 
2,427 

473 

280 
1,253 
1,622 

971 
1,361 

941 
2,661 
1,519 

582 
2,344 
2,783 
1,689 
4,848 

935 
1,608 

352 
2,057 
1,023 
1,024 
1,262 
2,846 
2,896 
2,109 
1,786 



Total expendi- 
ture for all 
Public School 
purposes. 



Balances. 



68 
35 
89 
17 
68 
30 
48 
37 
48 
32 
85 
41 
05 
74 

:;:; 

31 
.",4 

51 

10 

66 
34 

12 
30 
30 
07 

00 
00 

95 

43 
42 

30 
47 
30 
02 
14 
05 
03 
12 
31 
07 
44 
OP, 
57 
10 
17 
84 
64 
07 
61 
59 



3,368 89 
2,328 92 

26,311 21 

27,178 73 
7,669 91 
7,529 48 
4,638 72 
4,860 95 
1,602 07 

11,624 09 
2,870 32 
2,818 77 
5,243 92 

13,033 60 
8,321 12 
4,203 33 
3,012 46 

10,548 82 
5,113 14 

13,171 87 
5,703 08 
2,048 94 
1,054 81 
1,090 39 
4,712 48 
8,512 46 
3,509 45 
3,007 06 
4,658 45 
6,121 15 

10,101 77 
4,356 40 
2,261 47 

11,628 32 
6,156 34 
3,108 46 
6,453 30 
9,834 98 
8,124 60 

17,908 36 
4,170 88 
5,604 89 
1,942 39 
7,679 48 
6,240 98 
4,823 19 
4,899 84 
8,349 99 
7,058 02 

15,463 64 
8,200 90 



352 85' 

284 74 
82 79 



110 29 



506 40 

68 05 

31 93 

198 36 

267 62 

881 82 

232 25 

172 64 

302 63 

3 68 

77 29 

112 67 

42 54 



695 52 
43 81 



7 52 

81 03 
486 12 

82 89 
178 82 
267 49 

1,507 43 
938 63 
166 53 

d, 931 80 

190 65 

206 93 

29 49 

6,996 41 



474 40 

98 66 

115 47 

319 43 

420 24 

198 25 

208 64 

117 83 

1,264 12 

3,415 41 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PUBLIC 
V.— Table E.— 



Towns . — Concluded 



Receipts. 



82 Powassan 

83 Prescott 

84 Preston 

85 Rainy River 

86 Renfrew 

87 Ridgetown 

88 St. Mary's 

89 Sandwich 

90 Sarnia 

91 Sault Ste. Marie . 

92 Seaforth 

93 Simcoe 

94 Smith's Falls . . 

95 Southampton 

96 Stayner 

97 Steelton 

98 Strathroy 

99 Sturgeon Falls . . . 

100 Sudbury 

101 Thessalon 

102 Thornbury 

103 Thorold 

104 Tillsonburg.... .. 

105 Toronto Junction 

106 Trenton 

107 Uxbridge 

108 Vankleek Hill . . . 

109 Walkerton 

110 Walkerville 

111 Wallaceburg . . . 

112 Waterloo 

113 Welland 

114 Whitby 

115 Wiarton 

116 Wingham 



Totals. 



Totals. 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Incorp. Villages . . 



5 Grand Totals, 1905 

6 " 1904... 



7 Increases. 

8 Decreases 



9 Percentages 



Legislative 
grants. 



$ c. 
162 40 
444 00 

274 24 
171 00 
385 00 
279 00 
418 00 

98 00 
1,050 00 
1,034 00 
211 00 
534 62 
720 00 
302 00 
338 00 

126 00 
518 00 
133 00 
315 00 

238 00 

127 00 
175 00 

275 01 
1,258 31 

371 00 
188 00 

239 00 
411 00 
304 00 
509 00 
402 82 
380 88 
398 00 
314 00 
465 00 

49,261 93 



Municipal 

grants and 

assessments. 



tf c. 
1,200 00 
3,775 00 
4,000 00 
3,500 00 
4,815 41 
3,856 35 
5,572 90 
1,500 00 
18,930 61 
13,675 00 
3,000 00 
4,134 46 
9,786 99 
3,700 00 
2,762 00 
6,899 87 
4,748 00 
1,687 00 
1,550 00 
2,400 00 
1,897 73 
3,250 00 
5,212 60 
27,072 00 
4,335 00 
2,993 34 
1,806 00 
4,149 34 
7,800 00 
5,723 39 
6,643 08 
2,700 00 
4,550 00 
4,006 00 
4,456 51 

649,856 41 



! Clergy Reserve 

| Fund, balances 

and other 

sources. 



$ c. 

734 35 

338 63 

382 80 

25,261 52 

2,065 16 

39 43 



. 207 70 

295 82 

273 13 

540 92 

635 09 

113 33 

158 20 

204 61 

21,857 36 

116 30 

3,030 46 

15,875 41 

6 80 

75 

41 23 

13 76 

1,039 25 

405 45 

38 55 

865 44 

192 72 

50,972 48 

385 04 

140 17 

2,170 01 

128 56 

245 51 

377 37 

238,115 71 



Total receipts 

for all 

Public School 

purposes. 



239,160 14 
71,495 10 
49,261 93 
20,545 83 



2,211,468 06 

1,439,782 66 

649,856 41 

248,565 68 



1,146,609 22 

86,704 21 

238,115 71 

133,638 25 



380,463 00 
372,311 95 



4,549,672 81 
4,125,072 99 



•15 C. 

2,096 75 
4,557 63 
4,657 04 

28,932 52 
7,265 57 
4,174 78 
5,990 90 
1,805 70 

20,276 43 

14,982 13 
3,751 92 
5,304 17 

10,620 32 
4,160 20 
3,304 61 

28,883 23 
5,382 30 
4,850 46 

17,740 41 
2,644 80 
2,025 48 
3,466 23 
5,501 37 

29,369 56 
5,111 45 
3,219 89 
2,910 44 
4,753 06 

59,076 48 
6,617 43 
7,186 07 
5,250 89 
5,076 56 
4,565 51 
5,298 88 



937,234 05 



3,597,237 42 

1,597,981 97 

937,234 05 

402,749 76 



1,605,067 39 6,535,203 20 
1,413,551 26 ! 5,910,936 20 



8,151 05 



5 . 82. 



424,599 82 j 191,516 13 624,267 00 



69.62 



24.56 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance : Rural Schools, $11 .66 



19(H> 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



25 



SCHOOLS.— < vncluded. 
Financial Statement . — Concluded. 



Expenditure. 



Teachers' 
salaries. 


Sites and 

building school 

houses. 


Libraries, 
maps, appar- 
atus, prizes & 
school books. 


Rent and 

repairs, fuel 

and other 

expenses. 


Total expendi- 
ture for all 

Public School 
purposes. 


Balances. 


$ c. 

82 1,355 70 

83 3,312 00 

84 3,310 00 

85 2 080 20 


$ c. 

44 50 

162 00 


$ c. 
23 40 
41 85 


-5 c. 

657 60 
1,039 01 
1,304 55 
2,295 75 


$ c 

2,081 20 

4,554 86 

4,614 55 

21,958 74 

7,265 57 

4,145 35 

5,829 15 

1,614 21 

19,519 60 

14,492 36 

3.695 30 


$ c. 

15 55 

2 77 

42 49 


17,582 79 
26 40 




6,973 78 


86 3,982 00 

87 3,019 49 

88 4,054 68 

89 1,025 00 




3,257 17 




81 50 


1,044 36 
1,774 47 
589 21 
3,562 97 
4,606 76 
1.150 00 


29 43 
161 75 






191 49 


90 10,655 40 

91 9,476 15 

92 2,537 50 

93 4,613 00 

94 7,464 65 

95 3,214 85 

96 2,193 70 

97 3,009 40 

98 3,995 50 

99 2,110 00 

100 2,067 70 

101 1,910 00 


5,193 75 
175 00 


107 48 
234 45 

7 80 


756 83 

489 77 

56 62 


2 79 


89 90 598 48 5.304 17 






3,155 67 10,620 32 
736 15 3,951 00 








209 20 


578 09 
23,771 98 


8 00 

60 13 

44 96 

184 20 

130 23 


360 89 3,140 68 

1,820 54 28,662 05 

1,211 70 5,252 16 

2,516 76 4,850 46 

447 47 17,740 41 

462 49 2,372 49 

51C 37 2,010 37 

930 70 3,428 21 

1,102 38 4,552 38 

11,337 56 29,229 67 

1,270 41 4,981 89 

574 57 3,149 57 

772 09 2,807 09 

987 19 4,678 57 


163 93 
221 18 
130 14 


39 50 
15,095 01 




272 Z\ 


102 1,500 00 

103 2,480 52 

104 3,409 00 






15 11 




16 99 
41 00 


38 02 




948 99 


105 15,012 15 

106 3,638 03 

107 2,575 00 

108 2,035 00 

109 3,681 78 


2,879 96 
23 45 


139 89 


50 00 


129 56 
10 32 






103 35 




9 60 


74 49 


110 5,156 38 

111 4,474 94 


35,055 84 


327 62 


1,693 17 42,233 01 
2,002 66 6,477 60 
1,451 43 7.032 37 


16,843 47 
139 83 


112 5,474 87 




106 07 


153 70 


113 2,374 50 

114 3,835 00 


193 14 


922 73 
937 86 


3,490 37 
4,838 41 
4,424 66 
5,233 43 


1,760 52 


65 55 


238 15 


115 3,522 31 


86 78 




815 57 
1,353 28 


140 85 


116 3,805 88 


74 27 


65 45 








476,830 83 


182,175 94 


9,858 66 


204,303 38 


873,168 81 


64,065 24 


1 1,864,351 46 

2 879,264 22 

3 476,830 83 

4 201,877 25 


214,398 01 

256,775 80 

182,175 94 

62,411 22 


42,220 84 

27,711 23 

9,858 66 

4,561 09 


623,611 86 

397,395 12 

204,303 38 

76,355 16 


2,744,582 17 

1,561,146 37 

873,168 81 

345,204 72 


852,655 25 
36,835 60 
64,065 24 
57,545 04 


5 3,422,323 76 

6 3,246,574 25 


715,760 97 84,351 82 
442,864 79 80,350 50 


1,301,665 52 
1,183,392 84 


5,524,102 07 
4,953,182 38 


1,011,101 13 
957,753 82 


7 175,749 51 

8 


272,896 18 4,001 32 


118,272 68 


570,919 69 


53,347 31 












9 61.95 12.96 


1.53 


23.56 








1 







Cities, $21.94 ; Towns, $13.80 ; Villages, $12.61 ; Province, $13.91. 



26 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I.— Table F.— Financial 



Counties, 

(including incorporated villages, but not 
cities or towns), etc. 



Receipts. 






Bruce . . . 
Carleton. 



Frontenac 

Grey 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Russell 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Wellington 

York 

Districts 



Totals 

Totals, Incorporated Villages. 

Totals, Rural Schools 



Cities. 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford .... 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

» Niagara Falls. 
9 Ottawa 

10 Peterborough 

11 St. Catharines 

12 St. Thomas... 

13 Stratford 

14 Toronto , 

15 Windsor 

16 Woodstock 



279 
21 



25K 



Totals 



86 



$ c. 

461 00 
1,033 00 
1,408 68 
450 00 
250 62 
232 00 
300 26 
344 64 

58 00 
173 00 
219 00 

99 00 

76 00 
153 26 

55 00 
326 08 

70 00 

47 00 
244 00 

24 20 

2,813 00 

1,051 00 

168 00 

764 00 

35 00 
361 00 
230 00 

55 00 
2,598 00 



14,099 74 
1,257 00 



12,842 74 



232 00 
253 00 
211 00 
278 00 

1,135 00 
471 00 
670 00 
108 00 

3,924 00 
509 00 
265 00 
167 00 
258 00 

3,870 00 

501 00 

66 00 



12,918 00 



$ c. 

5,336 30 
9,945 43 
14,191 02 
3,418 24 
2,314 17 
2,389 33 
4,639 58 
4,520 92 

782 00 

702 32 
1,839 06 

631 16 
1,033 88 
2,084 90 

573 53 
2,224 99 

321 80 

226 10 
3,477 21 

313 20 

27,565 52 

4,278 60 

1,199 31 

5,437 45 

502 05 
5,074 71 
3,693 23 

392 33 
8,062 96 



117,171 30 
17,603 39 



99,567 91 



1,918 22 
2,014 67 
2,610 01 
3,290 45 

14,013 44 
6,315 36 
9,090 06 
1,278 25 

66,300 00 
6,169 40 
4,101 50 
2,262 86 
2,622 51 

52,853 80 

7,245 64 

560 0U 



182,646 17 



$ c. 

1,367 02 
2,176 53 
3,600 23 

767 85 
1,093 68 
1,216 97 
4,493 90 
1,941 78 

151 34 
81 94 

317 42 
71 16 

255 74 

566 54 

365 98 

1,080 72 

1,036 83 

6 98 

648 92 

81 79 

13,315 10 

2,747 26 

224 61 
1,408 75 

251 00 
6,619 79 
1,039 25 

535 53 
4,645 85 



52,110 46 
5,333 70 



215 89 

1,613 83 

275 60 

80 27 

1,568 38 

5,592 14 

136 34 

203 02 

140,444 14 



200 00 

80 00 

354 80 

11,088 34 

8 00 

330 00 



162,190 75 



7,164 32 
13,154 96 
19,199 93 
4,636 09 
3,658 47 
3,838 30 
9,^33 74 
6,807 34 

991 34 

957 26 
2,375 48 

801 32 
1,365 62 
2,804 70 

994 51 
3,631 79 
1,428 63 

280 08 
4,370 13 

419 19 

43,693 62 

8,076 86 

1,591 92 

7,610 20 

788 05 
12,055 50 
4,962 48 

982 86 
'15,306 81 



183,381 50 
24,194 09 



159,187 41 



2,366 11 

3,881 50 

3,096 61 

3,648 72 

16,716 82 

12,378 50 

9,896 40 

1,589 27 

210,668 14 

6,678 40 

4,566 50 

2,509 86 

3,235 31 

67,812 14 

7,754 61 

956 00 



9 c. 

3,890 06 
6,128 32 
10,967 85 
2,823 00 
2,095 30 
1,856 27 
3,104 51 
3,538 25 

657 50 

742 50 
1,250 88 

568 46 

800 00 
1,765 70 

365 00 
1,921 04 

734 57 

250 00 
2,583 21 

266 00 

21,509 79 

3,312 91 

1,125 00 

4,959 47 

337 50 
2,965 51 
2,621 50 

525 00 
7,217 91 



90,877 01 
11,216 77 



79,660 24 



1,360 00 
1,354 16 
1,399 92 
1,425 00 
7,926 00 
4,186 95 
4,066 67 
600 00 

41,122 66 
4,064 40 
2,040 00 
1,000 00 
1,366 6S 

23,700 00 

5,960 00 

650 00 



357,754 92 



102,222 44 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



27 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 
Statement, Teachers, Etc. 





Expenditure . 








Teachers. 




© 


CO 

3 co* 
















•2 % 




o 
A 
o 


8g 








E 






6 


— © o 

lis . 




be 


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9 


M 




<v 

A 






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A 


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o 

O. 

P 
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O 




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i 






it 

1 






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3 

o 


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£ 


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< 


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$ c. 


8 c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


* c. 








% 


» 


1 


185 50 


115 70 


1,239 18 


5,430 44 


1,733 88 


15 


4 


11 


397 


211 


2 


1.997 27 


129 89 


2,607 59 


10,863 07 


2.291 89 


31 


1 


30 


370 


211 


3 


1,678 23 


242 71 


4,161 12 


17,069 91 


2,130 02 


38 


6 


32 


410 


280 


4 


333 73 


163 37 


785 63 


4,105 73 


530 36 


12 


1 


11 


250 


250 


5 


16 93 


57 33 


605 15 


2.774 71 


883 76 


/ 




7 




296 


6 


773 32 


44 20 


441 20 


3,114 99 


723 31 


8 




8 




269 


7 


3,950 28 


191 70 


786 86 


8,033 35 


1,400 39 


10 




10 




309 


8 


525 22 


41 00 


1,064 03 


5,168 50 


1,638 84 


12 


4 


8 


418 


256 


9 


84 00 




128 50 


870 00 


121 34 


2 




2 




300 


10 


4 97 


7 02 


67 93 


822 42 


134 84 


3 




3 




247 


n 


118 90 


70 


814 30 


2,184 78 


190 70 


/ 




7 




227 


12 


104 60 


10 00 


64 26 


747 32 


54 00 


2 




2 




312 


13 


328 00 


6 00 


194 32 


1,328 32 


37 30 


4 




4 




200 


14 


80 26 


3 00 


494 41 


2,343 37 


» 461 33 


6 




6 




302 


15. 






92 65 

845 84 


457 65 
3,100 19 


536 86 
531 60 


1 
7 




1 
7 




365 


16 


223 85 


109 46 


273 


17 


512 76 




60 20 
23 00 
720 41 


1,307 53 

273 00 

3,737 10 


121 10 

7 08 

633 03 


2 

1 
8 


1 


1 
1 

8 


450 


265 


18... 




290 


19 


398 30 


35 18 


322 


20 


51 58 


12 45 


40 88 


364 91 


54 28 


1 




1 




260 


21 


4,850 43 


732 77 


6,823 84 


33,916 83 


9,776 79 


98 


11 


87 


• 275 


230 


22 


503 70 


39 00 


543 92 


4,399 53 


3,677 33 


15 




15 




235 


23 


6 50 


30 73 


355 70 


1,517 93 


73 99 


4 


1 


3 


450 


225 


24 


793 90 


26 63 


889 56 


6,669 56 


940 64 


18 


1 


17 


300 


272 


4 >5 


8 75 
5,134 67 




317 11 
1,206 05 


663 36 
9,310 90 


124 69 
2,744 60 


1 
12 




1 
12 




375 


2(1 


4 67 


252 


27 


299 47 


107 25 


1,054 75 


4,082 97 


879 51 


10 




10 




262 


28 


74 00 


125 96 


168 23 


893 19 


89 67 


2 




2 




212 


29 


2,716 51 


282 72 


2,873 88 


13,091 02 


2,215 79 


30 


4 


26 


331 


255 




25.755 63 


2,519 44 


29,490 50 


148,642 58 


34,738 92 


367 


34 


333 


350 


250 




2,833 52 


251 25 


4,465 36 


18,766 90 


5,427 19 


54 




54 




218 


22,922 11 


2,268 19 


25,025 14 


129,875 68 


29,311 73 


313 


34 


279 


350 


256 


1 


72 33 


i. 


717 56 


2,149 89 


216 22 


6 


1 


5 


600 


200 


1 


653 44 
520 45 




1,668 20 
1,808 74 


3,675 80 
3,060 53 


205 70 
36 08 


6 
7 




6 

7 




225 


3 


131 42 


200 


4 


926 48 


160 14 


836 53 


3,348 15 


300 57 


8 




8 




212 


5 


3,641 32 


1,204 35 


3,511 53 


16,283 20 


433 62 


36 




36 




200 


6 


1,896 OS 


2,468 24 


1,444 29 


9,995 56 


2,382 94 


13 


1 


12 


700 


281 


7 


1,210 67 


222 35 


4,153 06 


9,652 75 


243 65 


21 




21 




200 


8 


114 00 


10 00 


270 01 


1,014 01 


575 26 


3 




3 




• 200 


9 


142,628 52 


3,788 73 


22,669 07 


210,403 98 


264 16 


126 


38 


88 


394 


257 


10 


91 4C 




1,865 14 


6,020 94 


657 46 


15 


1 


14 


650 


310 


11 


1,238 86 
79 00 




1,220 18 
1,416 56 


4,499 03 
2,495 56 


67 47 
14 30 


9 
5 


1 


8 
5 


600 


180 


IV 




200 


13 


623 25 


88 73 


1,141 58 


3,220 24 


15 07 


7 




7 




200 


14 


14,967 48 


1,838 17 


27,306 49 


67,812 14 




104 


26 


78 


323 


200 


15 


845 00 


25 34 


924 30 
306 00 


7,754 64 
956 00 




15 
2 




15 

2 




382 


16 




325 












169,703 27 


9,957 47 


70,459 24 


352,342 42 


5,412 50 


383 


68 


315 


381 


225 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I.— Table F.— Financial 







Receipts 








Towns. 


oo' 

1 
.13 
O 
CO 

"o 

u 

<D 

a 


2 
a 
g 

ox 

> 

"5 

"3 

■a 

3 


T3 
C 

a 

tea 

el 

J 8 

3 CO" 


£* oo 

OS flj 

So 

* a 

W 


u 

oS > 
o ^ 


GO 
© 

si 

oo 
t- 

0J 

a 
e 
Eh 


1 Alexandria 


2 
1 
3 
2 


$ c. 
201 00 

87 00 
239 00 
166 00 
107 00 
310 00 
255 00 
142 00 
399 00 

72 00 

7 00 

185 00 

61 09 

61 00 
490 00 

53 00 
110 00 
214 00 

36 00 
2©0 00 

29 00 
165 00 

20 00 
134 00 

54 00 
67 00 
41 00 

31 00 
293 00 
142 00 

33 00 
172 00 
117 00 

58 00 

69 00 
156 00 

46 00 
140 00 
160 00 
126 00 

51 00 

79 00 
153 00 
146 00 

71 00 
110 00 

113 00 

114 00 
65 00 
58 00 
83 00 

32 00 


$ C. 

3,075 26 

1,093 38 

1,033 64 

2,438 65 

2.020 40 

4,306 33 

2.415 00 

1,000 00 

4,827 91 

785 83 

707 00 

1,730 08 

583 60 

611 60 

4,000 00 

833 11 

1,974 00 

2.599 20 
467 00 

2,864 40 
298 42 

2,515 00 
291 34 

1,739 81 
423 57 

1.297 74 
469 08 
357 74 

3,274 56 

1,135 5» 
553 51 

1.845 04 

1,376 34 
683 38 
400 00 

2,389 04 
451 05 
922 94 

1,912 10 

3,083 98 
650 36 

1.600 00 
1,083 00 
2,193 39 

810 00 

1,264 12 

914 00 

817 52 

650 00 

3,037 60 

1,219 40 

273 80 


$ c. 
375 25 
182 66 

1,782 41 
666 82 
904 44 
385 30 
655 96 
116 50 

2.576 83 
380 95 

2,107 00 


$ c. 
3,651 51 
1,363 04 

3.055 05 
3,271 47 
3,031 84 
5,001 63 
3,325 96 
1,258 50 
7,803 74 
1,238 78 
2,821 00 
1,915 08 

981 39 
678 57 

7.125 93 
941 55 

2,687 81 
2,888 78 
3,157 51 
3,203 24 

553 66 
19,698 26 

338 34 
3,578 14 

580 94 
2,639 34 

990 66 

405 12 
4,161 51 
1,408 34 

1.126 51 
4,020 70 
3,802 49 
1,403 87 

838 83 
3,479 51 

990 02 
1,673 28 
2,686 29 
3,509 23 

952 24 
2,806 03 
4,013 60 

3.056 33 
916 79 

1,726 92 
1,434 85 
1,024 60 

717 00 

10,326 55 

8,140 21 

452 51 


$ c. 

1,875 00 

891 00 




3 Amherstburg 


1,166 67 
1 470 00 






900 00 


6 Berlin 


2,000 00 

1,818 00 

900 00 




8 Cobourg 




4,246 £0 
600 00 




11 Fort Frances 


514 00 


12 Fort William 


850 00 


13 Gait 


336 79 

5 97 

2,635 93 

55 44 

603 81 

75 58 

2,654 51 

138 84 

226 24 

17,018 26 

27 00 

1,704 33 

103 37 

1,274 60 

480 58 

16 38 

593 95 

130 75 

540 00 

2,003 66 

2,309 15 

662 49 

369 83 

934 47 

492 97 

610 34 

614 19 

299 25 

250 88 

1,127 03 

2,777 60 

716 94 

35 79 

352 80 

407 85 

93 08 

2 00 

7,230 95 

6,837 81 

146 71 


325 00 




425 00 




2,620 00 
575 00 


16 Ingersoll 




1,499 00 

2,300 00 

250 00 








1,582 85 




300 00 


22 North Bay 


1,660 76 
275 00 


23 Oakville 


24 Orillia 


1,200 00 




419 00 


26 Owen Sound 


500 00 


27 Paris 


400 00 


^8 Parkhill 


1 
1 


340 00 


29 Pembroke 

30 Perth 


2,693 00 
800 00 


31 Ficton 




450 00 


32 Port Arthur 


1,200 00 


33 Prescott 


1,266 40 




521 90 




475 00 




1,450 00 


37 St. Mary's 


426 45 




825 00 




1,260 00 


40 Sault Ste. Marie 


1,220 00 
708 44 




42 Steelton 


1,261 60 
1,320 00 
1,333 75 








600 00 




467 54 




1,000 00 


48 Walkerton 


600 00 




400 00 




800 00 




500 00 


52 Whitby . . ..*..., 


325 00 






Totals 


63 


6,623 00 


79,299 81 


67,032 24 


152,855 05 


53,806 86 


Totals. 


258 
86 
63 

21 


12,842 74 

12,918 00 

6,523 00 

1,257 00 


99,567 91 

182,646 17 

79,299 81 

17,603 39 


46,776 76 

162,190 75 

67,032 24 

5,333 70 


159,187 41 

357,754 92 

152,855 05 

24,194 09 


79,660 24 
102,222 44 


2 Cities 




53,806 86 




11,216 77 






5 Grand totals 1905 


428 
419 


33,540 74 
33,049 76 


379,117 28 
339,154 If 


281.333 45 
187,431 34 


693.991 47 
559,635 25 


246,906 31 




227,136 29 








9 


490 98 


39,963 13 


93,902 11 


134,356 22 


19,770 02 
























4.83 


54.63 


40.54 




38.75 










Cost p 


er pup 


il, enrolled t 


ittendance ; 


Rural Scho 


ols $8.51 ; Ci 


ties, $18.24 j 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



29 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued. 

Statement, Teachers, etc.— Concluded. 







Expenditure. 




Balances 






Teachers. 






be 

G o 
cj o 

O) o 
*j so 

33 


S3 

. N C 

5'EO 

a «j 

_D O 
CO t* -^ 

a, « 

'IE aS w 
aj O/O 

*» a3 ad 


w 

3 


P. 

p 
a 

u 

O) 

A 


< 


aS a) 


X2 O 
£ aS 


6 


ai 

a 

a> 


aj 

1 
O . 

5 3j 

< 


£2 

as£$ 

5 C OT u 

g *« 55 2 


1 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ c. 

1,763 43 
245 04 

1,800 22 
944 74 
438 77 

1,254 19 
679 11 
338 16 

3,211 39 
204 02 
130 00 
823 08 
202 33 
199 81 

1,742 77 
240 81 
620 69 
537 28 
716 20 
919 11 
150 00 

1,180 44 

42 50 

488 87 

261 94 

164 35 

92 84 

45 07 

660 73 

367 80 

77 87 

1,232 45 

1,136 03 
322 70 
260 59 

1,458 71 

84 40 

399 93 

230 00 

1,172 24 
132 14 
894 30 

1,648 24 
273 02 
240 15 
761 32 


$ c. 
3.638 43 
1,363 04 
3,024 89 
2,873 25 
2,766 92 
4,976 54 
2,539 99 
1,238 16 
7,543 36 
1,033 02 
2,805 13 
1,915 08 

866 33 

624 81 
6,663 53 

900 81 
2,684 58 
2,837 28 
3,031 86 
3,181 41 

450 00 
19,698 26 

317 50 
1,756 39 

580 94 

897 65 

492 84 

405 07 
3,862 56 
1,408 34 

539 01 
3,736 15 
2,402 63 

844 60 

833 62 
2,950 69 

788 65 
1,673 28 
1,800 00 
2,476 49 

840 58 
2,292 23 
4,013 60 
2,734 20 

904 15 
1,408 86 
1,018 31 
1,022 65 

535 96 
8,435 90 
8,140 21 

384 55 


8 c. 

13 08 


9 
3 

7 
4 

10 
8 
4 

15 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 

15 
2 
4 
7 
2 
5 
1 
6 
1 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 

10 
4 
2 
4 
4 
2 
1 
6 
1 
4 
5 
4 
2 
4 
6 
5 
3 
4 
5 
4 
2 
2 
3 
1 




9 


"566 
'"726 

""466 

750 
"756 

' ' 'fiOO 
'"'550 

'"366 


208 


2 


197 00 
33 00 

458 51 
1,420 97 
1,581 46 


30 00 
25 00 





330 


3 

4 


30 16 
398 22 
264 92 

25 09 
785 97 

20 34 
260 38 
205 76 

15 87 


.... 
.... 

1 

1 
.... 

.... 
"i 

2 


7 
6 
4 

10 
8 
4 

14 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 

15 
2 
3 
6 
2 
4 
1 
6 
] 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 
9 
4 
2 
4 
4 
2 

"6 
1 
4 
5 
4 
2 
4 
4 
5 
3 
4 
5 
4 
2 
2 
3 
1 


228 
200 


5 

6 

7 


7 L8 

HO 89 

42 88 


225 
200 
225 


8 




225 


9 

10 


53 68 

229 00 

1,906 13 

242 00 

339 00 


31 79 


244 
200 


11 
12 


255 00 


450 
300 


13 




115 06 

53 76 
462 40 

40 74 
3 23 

51 50 
125 65 

21 83 
103 66 


325 


14 




212 


15 


2,300 76 

75 00 

539 29 




200 


16 
17 
18 


10 00 
25 60 


287 
253 

258 


19 


2,065 66 
679 45 




350 


20 
21 




225 
300 


22 


16,857 06 




308 


23 




20 84 
1,821 75 


275 


24 




67 52 


300 


25 




200 


26 
27 


228 80 


4 50 


1,741 69 

497 82 

05 

298 95 


250 
200 


28 




20 00 

126 60 

25 00 

11 14 


340 


29 
30 


382 23 
215 54 

" 1,803* 70 

20 


214 

200 


31 
32 
33 


587 50 
284 55 
1,399 86 
559 27 
5 21 
528 82 
201 37 


225 
300 
250 


34 




260 


35 


97 00 

22 60 

277 80 

448 35 

310 00 

50 00 


1 03 
19 38 




36 
87 


242 
400 


38 




206 


39 




886 29 

1,032 74 

111 66 

513 80 


285 


40 

41 


34 25 


305 
300 


42 




136 33 
292 12 


350 


43 


753 24 

1,127 43 

26 00 

175 00 


200 


44 


322 13 
12 64 

323 06 
416 54 

1 95 

181 04 

1,890 65 


275 


45 
46 


38 00 


200 
175 


47 


13 60 


200 


48 
49 


20 00 


389 65 

135 96 

1,410 90 

369 09 

59 55 


150 
200 


fin 


6.225 00 
7,265 97 




400 


51 


5 15 


167 


5? 


67 96 


325 










47,906 83 


1,380 67 


33,054 93 


136,149 29 


16,705 76 


220 


9 


211 


530 


240 


1 
2 
3 
4 


22,922 11 

169,703 27 

47,906 83 

2,833 52 


2,268 19 

9,957 47 

1,380 67 

251 25 


25,025 14 

70,459 24 

83,054 93 

4,465 36 


129.875 68 

352,342 42 

136,149 29 

18,766 90 


29,311 73 
5,412 50 

16,705 76 
5.427 19 


313 

383 

220 

54 


34 

68 
9 


279 

31f> 

211 

54 


350 
381 
530 


256 
225 
240 
218 


5 
6 


243,365 73 
135,790 89 


13,857 58 
7,646 85 


133,004 67 
135,737 17 


637,134 29 
506,311 20 


56,857 18 
53.324 05 


970 
944 


111 
118 


859 
826 


384 
384 


238 
234 


7 


107,574 84 


6,210 73 




130,823 09 


3,533 13 


26 


7 


33 




4 


8 


2,732 50 






















9 


38.20 


2.17 


20.88 








11.44 


88.56 












1 









Towns, $11.57 : Villages, $6.31 ; Province, $12.92. 



30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 

II. Table G. — Attendance, pupils in the 



Counties, 

(including incorporated 
villages, but not cities 
or towns) etc. 



•o 


be 


a 


as 










<£ 


as 


>» 




'3 




V 


Sv 


2 


a a 


?>* 



Reading. 





•o 


tf 


« 


A 


« 


u 


^ 




O 




to 


to 



1 Bruce 

2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenville 

12 Lennox & Addington 

13 Lincoln 

14 Middlesex 

15 Norfolk 

16 Northumberland 

17 Ontario 

18 Peel 

19 Perth 

20 Peterborough 

21 Prescott & Russell .... 

22 Renfrew 

23 Simcoe 

24 Stormont, Dundas 

Glengarry 

25 Victoria 

26 Waterloo 

27 Wellington 

28 York 

29 Districts 

Totals 

Totals Incorp. Villages. . 

Totals Rural Schools — 

Cities. 

1 Bellville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Guelph 

5 Hamilton 

6 Kingston 

7 London 

8 Niagara Falls 

9 Ottawa 

10 Peterborough 

11 St. Catharines 

12 St. Thomas 

13 Stratford 

14 Toronto 

15 Windsor 

16 Woodstock 

Totals 



743 

1,637 
2,160 
393 
263 
299 
444 
566 

68 

95 
226 

77 
148 
148 

78 
231 

79 

19 
406 

34 

5,697 

770 

166 



57 
557 
415 
108 



394 

749 

1,162 

200 

120 

148 

222 

284 

34 

50 

109 

36 

67 

81 

30 

111 

29 

9 

223 

19 

2,792 

390 

83 

470 
34 

285 

212 
59 

693 



349 



193 
143 
151 

222 

282 
34 
45 

117 
41 
81 
67 
48 

120 
50 
10 

183 

15 

2,905 

380 
83 



52« 

984 

1,272 

215 

121 

137 

259 

299 

34 

51 

121 

42 

103 

89 

51 

151 

43 

11 

248 

18 

3,192 

397 

101 

489 
35 

353 

250 
60 

665 



18,239 
2,976 



9,095 
1,411 



9,144 
1.565 



10,311 
1,877 



15,263 



375 
355 
350 
407 

1,732 
810 
798 
154 

6,013 
838 
334 
229 
384 

5,544 

901 

96 



7,684 



213 
205 
176 
205 
868 
409 
413 
89 

2,999 
377 
167 
120 
187 

2,881 

446 

52 



7,579 



162 
150 
174 
202 
864 
401 
385 
65 

3,014 
461 
167 
109 
197 

2,663 

455 

44 



8,434 



24 
262 
228 
302 

1,223 
624 
640 
100 

4,359 
593 
251 
185 
263 

3,709 

661 

60 



144 

554 

742 

93 

50 

76 

91 

201 

12 

22 

46 

12 

39 

24 

15 

63 

11 

3 

70 

6 

2,400 

247 

63 

386 
6 

116 
71 
38 

700 



105 

287 

328 

50 

40 

45 

61 

74 

12 

17 

28 

9 

17 

14 

7 

21 

6 

3 

38 

7 

1,165 

127 

15 

150 



17 

264 



162 

277 

407 

58 

47 

56 

81 

100 

8 

22 

27 

14 

26 

35 

14 

35 

16 

3 

77 

5 

1,070 

137 

25 

158 
7 

148 
76 
42 

240 



168 

273 
379 
82 
63 
59 
69 
91 
14 
21 
42 
19 
36 
21 
13 
47 
27 



5 

679 

142 



160 

236 

295 

100 

56 

54 

110 

81 

21 

11 

36 

23 

30 

46 

20 

59 

12 

4 

119 

11 

380 

76 

32 

127 
17 
89 

108 

4 

37 



6,301 
912 



3,071 
504 



2,875 
537 



2,354 
366 



55 



5,389 



78 

63 

110 

73 

531 

161 

185 

41 

1,707 

196 

89 

40 

83 

1,427 

212 

21 



2,567 



68 

50 

48 

65 

257 

109 

113 

12 

1,108 

127 

39 

51 

54 

661 

154 

16 



2,807 



63 

81 

47 

98 

284 

136 

169 

33 

1,342 

152 

54 

51 

98 

1,253 

268 

18 



19,320 



9,807 



9,513 13,707 



71 5,017 2,932 4,147 



2,338 



81 

89 

85 

92 

335 

182 

163 

32 

936 

218 

72 

41 

48 

1,135 

114 

16 



85 

72 
60 
79 

217 
172 
168 
36 
6S0 
145 



101 
775 
L53 

25 



3,639 



599 

926 

.988 

241 

227 

242 

341 

440 

68 

52 

167 

56 

148 

124 



221 

79 



292 

34 

1,715 

587 

166 

479 
57 

557 

407 
29 

203 



265 
91 



10,445 
2,313 



174 



240 



293 



8,132 



375 
355 
350 
407 

1,7*2 
810 
798 
101 

5,370 
838 
334 
229 
384 

5,544 

821 

96 



543 
869 
1,186 
275 
183 
172 
302 
288 

49 

75 
140 

55 
114 
100 

56 
185 

79 

10 
303 

21 

2,825 

490 

166 

537 
42 

364 

333 
53 

421 1 



10,236 ! 6,768 
2,034! 1,366 



8,202, 5,402 



229 
242 
350 

271 i 

1,529! 

649 

798i 

101 j 

4,171 

553 1 

243 1 

229 

384 

4,117 

821 

96 



18,544 14,783 



15,708 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



31 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS. — Continued 
various branches of instruction, etc. 





3 

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57 

98 

195 

58 

58 

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74 

61 

12 

28 

34 

11 

9 

41 

8 

42 

10 

9 

60 

6 

335 

78 

14 

86 

9 
51 
69 
10 

80 

1,648 
167 

1,481 

40 
10 
18 
30 

117 

30 

45 

9 

292 
28 
15 
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25 
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10 

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1 451 

2 766 

3 932 

4 218 

5 135 

6 177 

7 299 

8 162 

9 41 

10 67 

11 165 

12 56 


601 
906 
1,256 
276 
208 


413 
817 
1,085 
250 
15.0 


146 

333 

470 

144 

74 

58 

158 

116 

42 

13 

133 

23 

50 

64 

29 

77 

24 

6 

122 

11 

355 

204 

37 

166 

19 

134 

150 

4 

30 


291 

534 

645 

173 

120 

121 

175 

178 

42 

27 

154 

42 

66 

80 

42 

81 

24 

4 

222 

16 

1,175 

258 

54 

200 

35 
2U9 
212 

4 

17s 


249 
467 
1,020 
162 
150 

98 
219 
181 

41 


437 i 571 


8 

19 

122 

12 

8 

7 

32 

19 

1 

7 

42 


4 
19 

8 
11 

5 

8 
32 
15 

1 


4 
9 

8 
9 

5 

8 
32 

15 

1 






489 


40 

210 

54 

14 

2 


"*6 
3 
6 
7 
4 
3 


30 
99 
119 
24 
7 
25 
13 
39 




798 

1,362 

196 

136 

51 
331 
157 

68 


398 

1,365 

264 

102 

126 

310 

380 

68 

52 

162 


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874 

941 

4 


54 

69 

2 


230, 168 

338 259 

326 286 

56 47 








9 


13 

1 


4 

171 




"39 


29 
12 


79 
173 

55 
123 
105 

56 
145 

79 

'290 
16 
2,489 
494 
110 
528 

42 
360 
263 

99 
325 


75 
146 

55 
123 

98 

42 
116 

45 

10 
234 

16 

2,405 

426 

99 
370 

42 
249 
252 

11 
343 


35 79 
152| 171 

54 56 
126 1 148 

93 116 

20 33 
117 151 

241 79 












52 
2 




5 


47 


45 


17 


17 




20 


20 


4 
5 


13 123 

14 117 


87 
148 

'"99 
33 
























8 

9 

1 

19 


8 

' 9 

5 

7 


7 








12 


8 


12 






15 56 










16 173 


5 

7 


4 


4 












1 

"3 

1 
37 
5 
2 
2 

"3 
3 

"i4 

117 

7 

110 

3 
.... 

3 

8 


16 


17 46 








46 






18 16 


4 

131 
11 

845 

322 
62 

414 

19 

189 

154 

4 

143 


19 
233 

34 
614 
244 

75 
558 

'"'405 
311 

"io3 














19 270 


208 


2 


4 


2 


2 






1 


2 


24 




12 


20 21 








21 1,314 

22 320 

23 166 


762 

223 

40 

384 

57 
503 
187 

29 
126 


60 

64 

5 

17 

2 
6 


2 
40 

5 
17 

2 
6 


2 
40 

5 
17 


'"9 
"u 


3,971 

12 

131 

208 


146 


"*25 


58 
55 


157 
26 
10 
21 


11 

60 

"'46 


160 
6 


24 362 

25 42 




11 


11 


23 


26 439 


6 
6 






316 


6 


66 
1 


150 

16 




12 


27 271 


6! 6 






8 


28 90 
















29 90 




104 






722 


26 

977 

977 


15 

449 
91 

358 


250 

88 

162 


135 

1.007 
27 

980 


4 

876 
193 

183 


75 


7,384 
1,532 


10,026 
1,926 


8,632 
1,764 


3,192 
619 


5,362 
1,051 


5,506 
1,194 


6,965 
1,638 


6,684 
1,217 


476 
118 


365 
102 


233 
92 

141 


64 
35 

29 


7,059 
1,059 

6,000 


501 

4 


5,852 
1 375 


8,100 

375 
242 
350 
271 

1,352 
810 
798 
113 

2,500 
145 
206 
229 
384 

4,117 

821 

96 


6,868 

166 
161 
192 
271 

1,352 

540 

798 

68 

3,639 
353 
120 
138 
237 

2,203 

267 

96 


2,573 

85 

72 
145 
171 
546 
404 
168 

48 
901 
219 
189 

87 

101 

1,068 

193 

41 


4,311 

166 
161 
145 
171 
708 
404 
331 

48 

2,718 

748 

24? 

87 

149 

2,203 

292 

41 


4,312 

166 
355 
350 
171 
906 
404 
331 
48 
2,976 


5,327 

375 
355 
350 
171 

1,732 

81 C 

798 

48 

4,127 


5.467 
375 


358 


263 


497 


2. 242 




















36 




3 192 


350 

171 

1,732 

810 

798 






















4 271 


'108 

50 
168 


407 
62 
50 




















h 1,352 


62 
50 


30 
20 






62 
50 


108 
25 






S6 


6 810 


30 






7 798 


7 
"25 

'3 

1 

1 

.... 

53 




8 113 






















9 240 
10 603 


4,127 


394 


100 


90 


394 


3,572 




47 


348 


348 


348 


54 


11 223 


40 

229 

384 

5,544 

801 

96 


25 
229 
384 

' ' 'soi 

96 


180 
229 
384 
5,544 
40 
96 
























12 229 




229 




















13 237 














61 




14 2,203 

15 821 


293 


293 


293 


133 


293 
111 


12 


293 


293 




10 


16 96 










































445 




8,805 


12,809 


10,601 


4,438 


8,615 


12,801 


10,301 


14,836 


1,013 


1,141 


495 


577 


4,006 


12 


452 


774 


348 


100 



32 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 

II. — Table G. — Attendance, Pupils in the 





go 

'S. 
o 

M 

CD 

s 


o 
pq 

236 

74 

116 

209 

77 

278 

178 

118 

448 

74 

21 

115 

41 

33 

495 

38 

94 

149 

65 

155 

29 

216 

21 

114 

33 

69 

27 

24 

259 

135 

24 

123 

81 

54 

28 

159 

29 

95 

119 

117 

45 

180 

161 

161 

54 

77 

116 

85 

49 

63 

73 

36 


go 

O 

243 
66 

171 

174 
67 

218 

191 
92 

499 
54 
15 

115 
42 
33 

458 
38 

126 

224 
73 

193 
24 

179 
20 
83 
44 
73 
35 
27 

209 

100 
20 

117 
79 
47 
29 

135 
36 
98 

156 

137 
38 

143 

229 

157 
71 
68 

146 
96 
46 
65 
74 
22 


cd 
o 

CS 

a 

CD 

•^> 

>> 

"5 
•o 

CD 

bo 

ej 
Fh 

a> 
< 

259 

65 

229 

251 

101 

382 

270 

152 

626 

89 

28 

146 

69 

51 

782 

64 

118 

275 

54 

212 

31 

239 

25 

165 

62 

84 

44 

29 

312 

159 

32 

163 

118 

79 

33 

222 

47 

118 

188 

168 

55 

160 

248 

228 

81 

112 

141 

143 

77 

85 

107 

34 


o 

§? 

03 a 

„_. oj 

<d a> 
bc£ 
* « 
CD a3 

-1 
CD- 1 -' 

51 
46 
80 
65 
70 
77 
73 
72 
6* 
69 
78 
63 
83 
77 
82 
84 
53 
74 
39 
61 
58 
60 
61 
84 
80 
59 
71 
57 
67 
68 
73 
68 
74 
78 
58 
75 
72 
61 
68 
66 
66 
49 
63 
72 
65 
77 
64 
79 
81 
66 
73 
58 


Reading. 


< 


■a 
9 

CD 

O 


6 
'55 

P 

3 




Towns. 


c3 

Oh . 
f-T 

CD 
'O 

03 
CD 

151 
29 
48 

114 
35 
90 
79 
42 

311 
28 
12 
68 
23 
14 

368 
16 
77 
75 
87 

120 
14 

166 
10 
21 
12 
39 
14 
13 

115 
41 
7 
54 
35 
29 
14 
85 
19 
75 
82 

100 
14 

155 

134 

102 
27 
27 
84 
28 
25 
54 
19 
12 


u 
a 
cu 

f-T 

CD 

03 
CD 

a 

in 
E 

67 
31 
47 
58 
19 
59 
41 
33 
187 
32 

6 
22 
11 

9 
257 

8 

30 
30 
20 
42 
13 
69 

3 
29 
10 
20 

7 

6 
70 
39 

"36 
14 
16 
12 
55 
8 
45 
25 
23 
12 
49 
98 
62 
17 
17 
46 
21 
15 
12 
33 
5 


u 

CD 
CD 

a 
o 

CD 
W 


CD 

o3 
CD 
Ph 


T3 
03 
CD 

Ph 


CD 

Ti 
o3 

CD 

% 


CD 

s 
2 

CD 

3 


1 Alexandria 


479 
140 
287 
383 
144 
496 
369 
210 
947 
128 

36 
230 

83 

66 
953 

76 
220 
373 
138 
348 

5a 
395 

41 
197 

77 
142 

62 

51 
468 
235 

44 
240 
160 
101 

57 
294 

65 
393 
275 
254 

83 
323 
390 
318 
125 
145 
262 
181 

95 
128 
147 

58 


99 
30 
64 
56 
21 

112 
86 
31 

171 
24 
10 
47 
13 
13 

158 
17 
44 
74 
14 
53 
8 
63 
10 
49 
17 
25 
14 
9 
98 
33 
12 
50 
34 
13 
9 
58 
11 
41 
56 
37 
12 
51 
76 
54 
23 
40 
58 
49 
12 
26 
36 
12 


80 
16 
48 

114 
29 

120 
83 
49 

166 
20 
6 

59 
24 
17 

113 
18 
40 
80 
11 
69 
7 
48 
6 
44 
26 
28 
10 
16 
88 
62 
6 
52 
32 
28 
12 
50 
13 
23 
55 
46 
15 
26 
56 
47 
31 
34 
35 
43 
29 
17 
40 
9 


82 
34 
33 
41 
40 

115 
80 
55 

112 
24 
2 
34 
12 
13 
57 
17 
29 
68 
6 
47 
11 
49 
12 
54 
12 
30 
17 
7 
97 
60 
19 
48 
45 
15 
10 
46 
14 
9 
57 
48 
30 
42 
26 
44 
27 
27 
39 
40 
14 
19 
19 
20 


479 


479 

80 

192 

155 

90 

345 

369 

135 

917 

44 

18 

140 

75 

43 

953 

52 

70 

2o3 

31 

214 

39 

229 

31 

176 

77 

142 

62 

38 

283 

194 

44 

150 

125 

72 

22 

294 

47 

121 

275 

154 

57 

323 

390 

216 

81 

118 

262 

181 

70 

74 

95 

29 






2 Almonte , 


"47 


80 

' ' '383 
144 
496 
369 
210 
947 
128 


140 

' ' '383 

144 

496 

369 

210 

947 

128 

10 

230 

83 

66 

953 

76 

22 

373 

' ' 300 
53 

"46 

197 

77 

142 

62 

51 

169 

235 

' ' 240 
160 
101 

' " 294 
65 

' ' 275 
154 

83 
323 

30 
318 
125 
145 
262 
181 

95 
128 
147 




3 Amherstburg... 

4 Arnprior - 


192 

211 

69 


6 Berlin 


496 


7 Broekville 


369 


8 Cobourg 


135 


9 Cornwall 

10 Dundas 


947 

128 


11 Fort Frances 




12 Fort William 

13 Gait 


"*46 


230 
20 
66 

953 
76 

128 

373 


140 
60 


14 Goderich 


66 


1 5 Hawkesbury 

16 Tngersoll 


"52 


17 Kenora 


38 


18 Lindsay 


258 


19 Masse v 


31 


20 Mattawa 


17 


348 
53 

395 
28 

197 
77 

142 
62 
51 

468 

235 


288 


21 Newmarket 

22 North Bay 


53 

229 


23 Oakville 


28 


24 Orillia 


176 


25 Oshawa 


77 


26 Owen Sound 

27 Paris 


58 
62 


28 Parkhill 


51 


29 Pembroke 


283 


30 Perth 




31 Picton 


44 


32 Port Arthur 

33 Prescott 




240 
160 
101 


186 
160 


34 Preston 


101 


35 Rainy River 

36 Renfrew 


57 


*9 


294 

65 

193 

276 

254 

83 

323 

158 

318 

81 

145 

262 

181 

95 

51 

95 


209 


37 St. Mary's 

38 Sandwich 

39 Sarnia 


65 
121 
275 


40 Sault Ste Marie.... 

41 Seaforth 


154 

57 


42 Steelton 


328 


43 Sturgeon Falls 

44 Sudbury 


26 

216 


45 Thorold 


81 


46 Trenton 


101 


47 VankleekHill 

48 Walkerton 


262 
181 


49 Walkerville 

50 Wallaceburg 

51 Waterloo 


70 
128 
147 


52 Whitby. . 


47 










Totals 


11,765 


5,870 


5,895 

7,579 
9,513 
5.895 
1,565 


8,012 

8,434 
13,707 
8,012 
1,877 


68 

55 
71 
68 
63 


3,413 

5,389 

5,017 

3,413 

912 


1,896 

2,567 

2,932 

1,896 

504 


2,233 


2,196 


1,908 


119 


10,512 


9,186 

8,202 
14, 783 
9,186 
2,034 

34,205 
32,483 


9,082 

5,402 

15,708 

9,082 

1,366 

31,558 
32,920 


7,608 






Totals. 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 


15,263 
19,320 
11,766 
2,976 


7,684 
9,807 
5,870 
1,411 


2,807 

4,147 

2,233 

566 


2,338 

3,639 

2,196 

537 


1,988 

2,894 

1,908 

366 


174 

691 

119 

91 


8,132 
18,544 
10,512 

2,313 


5,852 
8,805 
7,508 


4 Incorp. Villages 


1,532 


5 Grand totals, 1905 . . . 

6 " 1904.. 


49,324 
47,807 

1,517 


24,772 
24,179 

593 


24,552 
23,628 

924 


32,030 
29,920 

2,110 


64.94 

62.58 


14,731 
14,057 


7,899 
8,350 


9,753 
9,484 


8,710 
8,526 


7,156 
6,576 


1,075 
814 


39,501 
43,866 


23,697 


7 Increases 

8 Decreases 


2.36 


674 


' ' 451 


269 


184 


580 


261 


'4, '365 


1,722 


i'362 




9 Percentages 




50.22 


49.78 


64.94 


— 


29.87 


16.01 


19.77 


17.66 


14.51 


2.18 


80.08 


69.35 


63.98 


48.04 



1MM5 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



33 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS.— Concluded. 

various branches of instruction, etc. — Concluded. 





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£ 
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X! ^ 
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a 

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a. 

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Q 

OS 

3 O 
525 


1 479 

2 80 

3 239 

4 211 

5 69 

6 496 

7 369 

8 210 

9 947 

10 128 

11 18 


479 

80 

128 

155 

69 

345 

lb3 

104 

278 

68 

18 


162 

34 

80 

42 

40 

115 

163 

55 

112 

44 

"*93 

12 
30 
20 
35 
39 

164 
6 
64 
18 
49 
18 
98 
12 
58 
18 
7 
97 

122 
19 
48 
77 
43 
10 
96 
14 
32 

257 
94 
45 
68 
26 

164 
27 
61 
39 
40 
14 
51 
50 
20 


162 
50 

128 

155 
69 

235 

163 

104 

278 
44 
8 
93 
36 
30 

2X1 
35 
54 

194 
17 
. 186 
18 
97 
11 
98 
38 
58 
27 
23 

185 

122 
19 

100 
77 
43 
22 

154 
27 
32 

257 
94 
45 
68 
72 

164 
58 
61 

132 
83 
29 
51 
50 
29 


479 
34 
33 
42 
40 

235 

369 
55 

636 

44 

8 

210 
36 
30 
57 
35 
38 

144 
6 

348 
18 
49 
28 
98 
38 
58 
27 
51 

185 

194 
19 

100 
77 
43 
31 
96 
65 

121 

257 
48 
30 

323 
26 

164 
27 
61 

132 

181 
55 
51 
50 
20 


' ' *240 
383 
144 
496 
369 
210 
947 


317 
140 
143 
383 
144 
496 
369 
210 
947 




















12 

13 

18 

12 

8 

51 

12 

8 

20 

10 

5 

5 

6 

10 

24 

7 

6 

10 

2 

20 

9 

9 

4 

12 
5 
8 
5 
10 
27 
5 

10 
9 

12 
2 

14 
6 

17 

22 
7 

10 
4 

15 
9 
9 
6 

15 

22 






















34 




1 

3 

.... 






47 


42 


42 




12 




47 


47 


















































58 
369 
























































347 




112 








1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
.... 

2 
.... 

.... 






















8 
210 

60 

66 
124 

76 

38 
373 

31 
288 

53 
395 

28 
147 

77 
142 

27 

51 
256 

'"44 

150 

160 

43 

51 

294 

"32 


36 
93 
























12 140 08 
























13 60 

14 66 

15 585 

16 52 

17 73 

18 258 

19 31 

20 288 

21 39 


36 
30 

585 
35 
80 

194 
17 

288 
39 

160 
28 

147 
05 
58 
27 
32 

185 

194 
44 

100 

111 
43 

96 

27 

121 

57 

151 

45 

323 

158 

164 

81 

61 

132 

181 

43 

51 

95 

29 
















































953 
76 

'"373 


57 








953 




450 






250 


.' 












46 








220 














46 


46 






40 


4« 










138 

100 












17 


17 


17 


3 




17 


17 


*'l8 






22 229 

23 28 






















32 
197 

77 
142 

62 

51 
468 
235 

44 
240 
160 

56 






















1 
.... 

1 
1 
1 

"i 






24 176 
























25 77 
























26 103 

27 62 














































28 32 














51 










29 283 

30 191 

31 44 

32 240 

33 160 

34 101 

35 57 










70 






























































240 


































66 






















1 




























36 294 


294 
65 














154 




96 






37 47 














"2 






38 121 










193 














39 275 
























40 154 




























41 69 


83 
323 


83 
3-3 


























42 323 






















.... 

.... 

1 
.... 






43 82 










360 
297 










20 


4 


44 318 

45 81 


216 

81 

145 

262 

181 

95 

74 

147 

58 


318 


9 


9 


9 






9 


9 


53 




46 118 


145 
262 
181 
95 
128 
























47 262 










262 










132 




48 181 


181 








83 


181 








49 95 








62 
1 










50 128 


19 


















8 
12 
6 




51 147 




















52 47 


















































9,366 


6,293 


3,102 


4,616 


5,602 


7,678 


8,338 


376 


114 


114 


3 


3,255 


230 


1,067! 119 


201 


895 


575 


29 


6 


1 8,100 

2 12,809 

3 9,366 

4 1,926 


6,868 

10,601 

6,293 

1,764 


2,573 

4,438 

3,102 

619 


4,311 
8,615 
4,616 
1,051 


4,312 

12,801 
5,602 
1,194 


5,327 
10,301 
7,678 
1,638 


5,467 
14,836 
8.338 
1,217 


358 

1,013 

376 

118 


263 

1,141 

114 

102 


141 

495 

114 

92 


29 

577 

3 

35 


6.000 
4,006 
3,255 
1,059 


977 

12 

230 


358 

452 

1,067 

91 


162 

774 
119 

88 


348 

' 201 

27 

1.556 
2,130 


445 
895 
193 

1,716 


1,481 

1,007 

575 

167 


110 
53 
29 

199 
197 

2 


497 

100 

6 

4 


5 32 201 

6 31.382 


25,526 
31,382 


10,732 
9,226 


18,593 
16,946 


23,909 
23,716 


24,944 


29,858 
31,479 


1,865 
1,065 


1,620 
717 


842 
716 


644 


14,320 


1,219 


1,968 


1,143 


3,230 
3,133 


607 
479 
















7 819 


' 5,856 


1,606 


1,647 


193 






800 


903 


126 














97 


1?8 


8 




1,621 












574 


















3.28 






















9 65.28 


51. 7» 


21.76 


37.69 


48.47 


50.57 


60.53 


3.78 


1.71 


1.31 


29.03 


2.47 


3.99 


2.32 


3.15 


3.48 















3 E 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
L— Table H.— 



Collegiate Institutes. 



1 Aylmer 

2 Barrie 

S Berlin 

4 Brantf ord 

5 Brockville 

6 Chatham 

7 Clinton 

8 Cobourg 

9 Collingwood 

10 Gait 

11 Goderich 

12 Guelph 

13 Hamilton 

14 Ingersoll 

15 Kingston 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 

21 Orillia 

22 Ottawa 

23 Owen Sound 

24 Perth 

25 Peterborough 

26 Renfrew 

27 Ridgetown 

28 St. Catharines 

29 St. Mary's 

30 St. Thomas 

31 Sarnia 

32 Seaforth 

33 Stratford 

34 Strathroy 

35 Toronto (Harbord) 

36 Toronto (Jameson) 

37 Toronto (Jarvis) .. 

38 Toronto junction. . 

39 Vankleek Hill 

40 Whitby 

41 Windsor 

42 Woodstock 

Totals 



Receipts. 



$ c. 

837 31 
*1,131 63 
|2 730 25 
*1,301 29 
♦1,236 47 
1,241 28 

901 62 

♦fl,395 37 

♦986 46 

*1,214 90 

♦1,119 69 

♦1,264 14 

♦J5,961 99 

♦tl,561 92 
|2,596 34 
♦1,223 66 

*t 1,750 29 

♦1,090 17 
♦1,119 92 
♦1,201 14 
♦1,188 01 
♦1,293 78 
♦1,260 37 

952 75 
♦1,261 29 

fl,233 38 

♦1,033 53 

♦1,244 65 

896 59 

♦1,350 07 

♦1,337 53 

♦967 31 

f2,255 93 

♦966 97 

♦1,397 27 

*1,359 19 

♦1,376 10 

1,166 63 

♦1,007 44 

849 68 

1,328 11 

♦1,188 76 



58,781 18 



$ c. 

1,714 77 
1,530 81 
3,089 38 



1,450 00 



1,584 87 
1,917 82 
936 46 
2,096 28 
1,288 00 



1,857 62 



2,034 14 
1,200 00 

3,706 30 

2,700 00 

1,004 87 

313 28 



2,916 76 
1,480 38 



2,020 18 

2,089 08 

4,685 45 

992 65 

1,951 14 

1,999 01 
1,637 33 
1,300 00 
1,653 79 



900 51 
2,280 37 
1,470 78 
3,071 47 
1,756 77 



60,630 27 



9 C. 

1,650 00 
2,500 00 
6,000 00 
7,900 00 
7 200 00 
9,990 00 

3,300 00 
2,400 00 
3,100 00 
39,000 00 
2,800 00 

7,641 33 

24,656 43 

4,086 03 

6,650 00 

3,211 00 

25,589 00 

2,355 79 
2,900 00 
6,000 00 
4,400 00 
18,426 00 
4,500 00 

3,694 41 
9,000 00 

2,950 00 
1.300 00 
4,762 07 
2,800 00 

8,206 18 

6,211 50 

1,900 00 

6,500 00 

2,500 00 

26,817 47 

16,449 87 

19.825 66 

7,165 00 

1,800 00 

2,000 00 

10,126 22 

4,295 40 



334,559 36 



$ c. 

1,024 50 
1,777 90 
2,165 25 
2,820 90 
959 75 
1,951 41 

995 25 

747 50 

1,893 69 

2,443 84 

1,606 15 

1,311 00 

5,795 50 

981 50 
5,333 60 
1,950 75 
4,199 00 

36 56 
3 00 



1,436 15 
12,307 18 
2,520 85 

360 50 
2,447 75 

61 50 

998 25 

120 00 

1,311 50 

2,267 00 



1,320 20 
4,122 15 
1,024 00 
3,884 00 
5,169 00 
4,513 00 
2,119 00 

35 00 
378 55 

87 00 
2,003 75 



86,483 38 



568 19 

3,510 87 

4,605 87 

887 61 

1,361 12 

2,553 65 

1 228 89 

295 27 

232 87 

593 42 

2,414 13 

18,346 00 

16 00 

639 83 

3,316 42 

1,040 95 

732 57 

2,702 16 

2,165 90 

390 29 

953 81 



2,830 32 

751 16 
721 52 

612 51 

1,369 74 

1,403 13 

144 17 

141 00 

436 31 

2,571 21 

379 29 

181 96 



923 94 
538 51 
188 94 
94 18 
680 60 



62,524 31 



$ c. 

5,794 77 
10,451 21 
18,590 75 
12,909 80 
12,207 34 
15,736 34 

8,010 63 
6,755 96 
7,149 48 
45,348 44 
9,227 97 

28,562 47 

36.429 92 

9,126 90 
17,896 36 

9,460 50 
33,470 86 

9,890 98 
8,888 82 
8,596 30 
8,291 25 
32,026 00 
14,028 30 

7,239 20 

13.430 56 

6,877 57 

6,790 60 

12,215 30 

6,144 91 

13,915 39 

9,984 35 

8,396 05 

14,557 37 

6,326 72 

32,098 74 

22,978 06 

25,714 76 

12,275 08 

5,661 32 

4,887 95 

14,706 98 

9,925 28 



602,978 50 



♦ Grant ($50) for Cadet Corps included. 

| Grant ($1,500) for Normal College included. 



t Grant for Technical Education included. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



35 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS. 

Financial Statement. 



Expenditure. 






a 


o3 
O 


3 =3^ 


gj 






"3 . 


3 

a 

o 
o 


£<e a 

Sb'I 


55* 




\ 




t3 .-> 


eS 




a «r 










_ 


£ & 0J o 


t3 o 






Charges per year for tuition. 


.a 

u> S3 
2 > 


O 




*1* 









■a o 


to 


o r 30*0 


J2a . 


«0 












O aj to 








bo.9 






© X ^ 
■°®3 


X 


5 




'3 o 


t-c <Z3 

IS 


£ aJ be p 




o 


o 

5 




« 


« 


iJ 


C/J 


H 


m 




8 c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 




1 527 80 


17 80 


51 95 


722 69 


5,410 24 


384 53 


Res. F. I. 85 ; others $10. 


2 2,368 48 




160 46 


1,348 20 


9,840 60 


610 61 


$10. 


3 1,382 51 

4 


58 82 


2,860 43 
35 28 


5,349 61 
2,761 77 


18,590 75 
12,321 40 




$10. 


201 05 


588 40 


City and Co. $10 ; others $16. 


5 


481 83 


130 50 


2,582 81 


11,247 59 


959 75 


85. 


6 


1,199 80 


391 27 


4,015 59 


15,661 66 


74 68 


City first year free, other years 86 ; others 

$10. 
86 ; 88 ; 810. 


7 




25 90 
69 53 


740 70 
1,034 70 


5,395 60 
6,028 81 


2,615 03 
727 15 


8 


65 84 


Res. 812 ; Co. free ; others 814. 


9 


3/7 07 




1,168 16 


6,563 73 


585 75 


Town F. I. free: others $10. 
Co. 810; others 314. 


10 24,380 90 


31 08 


205 77 


1,872 23 


33,823 31 


11,525 13 


11 


507 93 


268 47 


913 35 


7,229 75 


1,998 22 


Lower School $6 : Com. F. 88 ; Upper and 
Middle Schools 810. 


12 18,238 00 


58 64 


121 05 


1,950 48 


27,838 17 


724 30 


City free ; Co. and adjoining Co's 810 ; 

others $20. 
Res. Jr. Lower School 82.50 ; others $10 ; 

non-res. 825. 


13 292 84 


277 11 




15,751 86 


36,429 92 












14 88 30 


175 64 


90 00 


1,605 55 


8,734 49 


392 41 


87.50. 


15 2 197 89 


424 71 


217 53 


1,972 30 
1,150 44 


17 896 36 




Res. 85 to $25 : non-res. 820 to 825. 

Res. & Co. 87.50 to $10; others 87.50 to 820. 

First vear free ; City and Co. $10 ; others 


16 424 71 




171 13 


9,460 50 




17 2,329 25 




574 49 


5,309 50 


32,321 74 


1,149,12 


18 410 00 


34 24 


35 00 


788 33 


7,041 74 


2,849 24 


830. 
Free. 


19 


202 49 




1,769 92 


7,248 99 


1,639 83 


Town and Co. free ; others 810. 


20 20 00 


209 04 


120 54 


1,625 77 


8,495 35 


100 95 


Free. 


21 129 00 


84 09 
731 26 




1,636 31 
7,537 90 


7,687 01 
31,764 01 


604 24 
262 95 


Town 85 ; others $10. 


22 849 38 


1,142 97 


Res. $20, 825 : non-res. $45, $50. 


23 426 02 


525 68 


195 00 


2,544 11 


13,700 81 


327 49 


Res. first year free, other years $8 to 812 ; 
Co. $10 ; non-res. 812 to $15. 


24 


3 95 




1,211 20 
3,544 06 


6,125 15 
13,430 56 


1,114 05 


Co. 86 ; non-res. 816. 


25 1,100 00 




Res. first year 85, other years 810 ; non- 












res. $25. 


26 20 67 


28 24 
256 14 


272 24 
101 75 


1,233 42 
1,901 17 


6,877 57 
6,629 06 




Res. free; non-res. $15. 

Town $6; Co. and non-res. 810. 


27 


161 54 


28 65 33 






4,368 98 


12,215 30 




Res. and Co. free : others 816. 


29 50 75 




43 11 


971 91 


5,663 13 


481 78 


Town first year free, other years 85 ; all 














others $10. 


30 




68 89 


2,971 54 


13,915 39 




H. S. D. first vear free, other vears $10 ; 














Co. $10 ; others 830. 


31 




751 16 


1,933 32 


9,801 08 


183 27 


Free. 


32 138 00 


448 55 


83 48 


878 23 


6,518 07 


1,877 98 


$6; $8; $10. 


•33 403 20 


243 83 


359 58 


4,574 28 


14,006 66 


550 71 


810. 


34 


99 94 




1,086 78 


6,326 72 




Town F. I free ; others $10. 


35 259 95 

36 226 97 

37 420 47 


945 24 

656 51 
1,204 91 


231 94 
370 32 
989 94 


6,238 65 
3.836 26 
3,900 44 


31,075 78 
22,978 06 
25,714 76 


I 1,022 96 


( F. I $6 ; Form II 815 : F. Ill 821 ; F. IV 
1 $27 ; $6 additional for non-res. 


38 362 29 


940 15 


158 14 


2,412 01 


11,682 59 


592 49 


810; $15. 


39 453 31 


162 70 


34 42 


922 47 


5,502 90 


158 42 


Province free ; others $10. 


40 89 95 


191 03 




727 31 
5,407 99 


4,854 62 
14,408 91 


33 33 

298 07 


Town 820 ; Co. 87.50 ; others $10. 


41 


131 42 


H. S. D. and Co. free ; others 830. 


42 118 00 


241 11 


292 20 


1.628 47 


9,829 78 


95 50 


Res. and Co. 87.50; non-res. $10. 


57,774 47 


11,036 42 


10,755 86 


115,900 77 


568,288 62 


34,689 88 


9 free ; 33 not free . 



36 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
L— Table H.— Financial 



High Schools. 



1 Alexandria .. 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnpnor 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville. . . 
* Belleville — 
9 Bovrmanville 



10 Bradford. 

11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 

13 Caledonia 

14 Campbellford 

15 Carleton Place 

16 Cayuga 

17 Chesley 

18 Colborne 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deseronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

23 Dutton 

24 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex , 

27 Fergus 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William 

30 Gananoque 

31 Georgetown 

32 Giencoe 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville 

36 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptville 

40 Kenora 

41 Kincardine 

42 Leamington 

43 Listowel 

44 Lucan 

45 Madoc 

46 Markham 

47 Meaford 

48 Midland 

49 Mitchell 

50 Mount Forest 

51 Newburgh 

52 Newcastle 

53 Newmarket 

54 Niagara 

55 Niagara Falls South. 

56 North Bay 

57 Norwood 



Receipts. 



S c. 

641 58 
702 38 
613 71 
*646 80 
712 81 
620 82 
469 20 
fl,143 45 
793 75 

592 74 
852 93 
468 85 
572 02 
686 36 
689 35 
579 50 
463 67 
462 08 
860 72 
651 05 
*686 49 
666 19 
575 75 
478 14 

540 10 
f951 04 

541 06 

616 04 
1,032 66 

713 02 
619 24 
592 96 
972 88 
433 92 
623 71 
604 56 
606 01 
735 18 
772 92 
1,016 60 
762 30 
689 98 
635 27 
645 83 
575 43 
727 70 
843 73 
468 40 

617 2b 
*761 04 

555 57 
477 27 

*745 96 
420 37 
526 53 

1,131 60 
578 97 



757 70 

702 38 

613 71 

1,085 95 

1,746 68 

700 00 

530 00 

435 00 

1.854 41 

728 14 

2,000 00 

965 72 

1,735 61 

686 36 

689 35 

1,824 31 

722 58 

675 15 

3.190 98 
651 05 

1,036 49 

2,324 96 

1,076 56 

700 00 

721 10 

2.191 79 
582 78 

1.392 22 



963 02 
619 24 
673 04 



559 50 
1,244 51 

604 56 
1,606 01 
2,239 00 

744 34 



1,204 60 
1,506 26 
800 00 
799 27 
1,065 35 
1,707 00 
1,617 01 



800 00 
761 04 
1,855 00 
790 00 
750 00 
490 00 
658 16 



919 41 



* c. 

2,083 00 

2,613 36 

1,700 00 

672 08 

1,000 00 

750 00 

720 00 

4,250 53 

2,370 00 

600 00 
1,600 00 
1,000 to 
1,000 00 
2,410 57 
1,950 00 



1,70© 00 

1.200 00 

11,620 48 

2,350 00 

850 00 

l.roo 00 

1,200 00 

15,539 46 

875 00 

1,500 00 

2,400 00 

500 oO 

2,500 00 

8,065 40 

1,233 51 

1,000 00 

994 00 

440 00 

650 00 

1 700 00 



1,612 44 

2,800 00 

3,550 00 

330 00 

2,400 00 

1,400 00 

1,000 00 

700 00 

500 00 

1,525 00 

3,350 00 

1,500 00 

1,400 00 

640 00 

543 00 

1,100 00 

550 00 

600 00 

4,432 30 

568 33 



261 50 
80 50 
921 35 
419 00 
639 00 



264 05 
275 90 

831 00 
1,206 00 
7 00 
101 00 
392 00 
135 00 



720 50 



184 00 
703 50 



1,414 00 
516 00 
410 75 
23 25 
416 00 
393 75 



89 50 

1,051 75 

650 00 

326 00 



800 75 



1,700 88 



1,307 50 
88 50 

1,141 69 

1,207 00 
552 00 

1,697 00 
893 00 
319 00 
77K <9 
688 50 



878 40 



349 00 
656 00 



$ c. 

1,932 53 

6 85 

1,278 75 

50 25 

1,392 34 

616 84 

483 15 



351 17 

393 79 

218 82 

443 16 

482 67 

332 91 

833 66 

870 00 

75 54 

1,794 68 

4,140 41 

1,041 04 

105 02 

1,503 87 

1,605 04 

414 71 

81 38 

281 06 

195 82 

528 85 

775 79 

42 00 

447 16 

1,876 81 



1,015 42 
951 97 
826 07 
251 91 

1,415 82 
435 68 



1,530 38 
963 46 
237 93 
125 20 
656 88 
760 97 
430 49 

8,635 40 
211 26 
834 91 
221 04 
475 70 
302 96 
127 44 

2,103 49 
119 05 
977 51 



$ c. 

5,414 81 
4,286 47 
4,286 67 
3,376 43 
5,270 83 
3,326 66 
2,202 35 
6,093 03 
5,645 23 

3,145 67 

5,877 75 

2,884 73 

3,891 33 

4,508 20 

4,297 36 

3,273 81 

3,682 19 

4,131 91 

19,812 59 

4,877 14 

3,381 50 
5,495 02 

5.871 35 
17,648 31 

2,628 33 
4,947 14 
4,135 66 
3,430 86 

4.308 45 

4.872 94 
3,970 90 
4,792 81 
2,292 as 
2,448 H 
3,470 19 
4,535 34 
2.463 93 
6,002 44 
6,453 82 
4.5H6 60 
5,134 78 
5,618 *0 
4,214 89 
3,777 30 
3,549 66 
5,392 67 

5.309 23 
12,772 80 

3,905 03 
4,445 49 
3,271 61 
2,285 97 
3,777 32 
1,587 81 
3.8-8 18 
6,031 95 
3,700 22 



♦Grant (550) for Cadet Corps included. fGrant for Technical Education included. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



37 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 
Statement. — Continued. 



"3 2 



$ C. 

190 00 



112 00 
9 50 



228 73 



432 66 



89 00 
559 83 

25 95 

6,937 45 

306 62 



23 65 
1,504 13 
3,500 00 





69 18 



1,000 00 

66 00 

6 00 

164 00 



7 40 

38 00 

307 02 



20 40 
663 18 



250 00 



141 55 
62 97 



355 85 
,746 35 
468 36 



60 00 
62 29 



93 00 



1,529 49 
159 00 



Expenditure. 



o 

& . 



$ C. 



158 54 

142 04 
18 99 
39 15 

132 64 



148 18 
16 53 



21 05 



384 80 

58 44 

410 14 



40 06 
194 42 



25 34 
38 65 
29 75 

124 74 



35 21 
201 61 



448 27 
120 85 
105 00 
24 09 
394 96 



50 00 

34 71 

216 76 

525 74 



247 56 
74 57 
44 95 
4 50 
90 50 
13 75 

201 76 



140 00 



a? > ~ 

= is 

te ^" X 3 
; p. 05 § 









<x> o >-> 



$ c. 

62 83 
7 39 



199 99 



19 73 
33 41 



44 65 

47 97 
60 38 
23 06 
33 53 



65 00 

39 68 

119 53 

48 53 



52 51 

251 95 

116 96 

69 75 

37 94 



61 84 



71 55 
367 63 
162 31 



10 93 



29 00 
59 35 



118 84 
252 17 
410 98 
204 16 

38 60 
178 20 

60 00 
197 86 
232 39 



1,337 30 
21 93 



92 36 

20 36 

9 85 

14 57 

114 60 

503 32 



o e 

B o 

.5 

■si 

5S. 



$ c. 

1,726 66 
935 74 
593 39 
482 22 
599 86 
439 20 
188 15 
1,422 14 
1,227 62 

465 06 
709 08 
328 46 
739 44 
748 97 
597 85 

352 62 
389 73 
500 75 

1,750 28 
980 30 
538 31 

1,211 51 

353 67 
1,104 25 

323 62 
372 68 
494 69 
726 26 
231 20 
798 48 
664 42 

2,270 83 
673 35 
132 86 
971 25 
612 84 
160 00 
876 93 
263 08 

1,150 62 
872 51 

1,375 54 

1,061 69 
834 37 
411 56 
642 32 
650 63 

1,224 81 
461 69 

1,218 04 
265 59 
301 14 

1,044 88 
158 85 
858 60 

1,079 14 
979 95 



8 c. 

4,619 49 

4,277 28 
3,265 39 
3,181 71 

4.200 98 
2,862 66 
1,656 56 
6,093 03 
5,580 81 

2,717 07 
5,613 76 
2,140 67 
3,230 43 
4,508 20 
4,277 48 
2,806 83 
3,589 42 
2,321 28 
13,587 73 
4,404 97 
3,230 86 
5,458 02 
4,811 22 
6,914 00 
2,621 62 
4,044 32 
3,245 71 
3,076 26 
4,186 47 
4,872 94 
3,970 90 
4,787 54 
2,224 28 
1,670 26 
3,370 49 
4,203 39 
2,420 00 
4,929 44 

5.201 07 
4,566 60 
5,119 16 
5,239 10 
4,214 89 
3,645 92 
3,089 44 
4,661 47 
5,135 27 

12,668 46 
3,749 92 
4,389 97 
2,932 90 
1,704 95 
3.777 32 
1,563 51 
2,941 64 
6,031 95 
3.528 95 



$ c. 

795 32 

9 19 

1,021 28 

194 72 
1,069 85 

464 00 

545 79 



64 42 

428 60 
263 99 
744 06 
660 90 



19 88 

466 98 

92 77 

1,810 63 

6,224 86 

472 17 

150 64 

37 00 

1,060 13 

10,734 31 

6 71 

902 82 

889 95 

354 60 

121 98 



5 27 

68 60 

778 58 

99 70 

332 05 

43 93 

1,073 00 

1,252 75 



15 62 
409 10 



131 38 
460 22 
731 20 
173 96 
104 34 
155 11 
55 52 
338 71 
581 02 



24 30 
946 54 



171 27 



Charges per year for tuition. 



$6. 



[others $10. 



Free. 

Res. 81 ; Co. and non-res. 

Res. free ; non-res. 810. 

810. 

Res. free ; Co. $5 ; others $10. 

$10. 

Free. 

Res. free ; others 825. 

Form I. with Latin $4 : Foim II. $6 ; Forms 

III. and IV. $7,50 ; Co. free. 
Res. F. I. free ; others $10. 
$10. 
Free. 

Free ; other Cos. $4.50. [others $10. 

H.S.D. $6; Co. and adjoining Cos. free: 
Res. free ; Lanark and Carleton Cos. $5 
Free. 
810. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res. free ; others $10. 

Res. F. I. free ; II. & III. 89.50 ; non-res, $10. 
Free. 
$10. 

Res. 810 : non-res. $20. 
Res. 85 ; non-res, and Co., 810. 
Res. and Co. free ; others 810. 
Res. free ; others $10. 
Res $10 ; non-res. free. 
Free. 

Res. free ; Co. and non-res. $5. 
Form I. $7 ; others $10. 
810. 

F. I. $5; other F.'s $10. 
Free. 
Free. 
$10. 
Free. 
Free. 

Res. free ; Co. $5 : others $25. 
Free ; non-res. $10. 
H.S.D. 88; Co. 810. 
Co. free ; outside Co. $10. 
Town, F. I. $7, without Latin or French 
810. [free; all others 810. 

Res. 87 ; non-res. 810. 
$10. 

Town, 1st yr. $5, other vrs. $8 ; others $10. 
H.S.D. $5 ; others $10. 
Res. $6 ; non-res. $10. 
$10 ; F. I. freetoces. 
Free. 
Free. 
$10. 
Free. 
Free. 
Lower and middle schools. $10; upper 835. 

$6. 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
I.— Table H.— Financial 





Receipts. 




High Schools. 


So 
> 

'a? 

'So 
<v 


a 


O 

g 

bo 

a, 


aj 
o 

a 
g 

be 

'3 
p 


N 


<V 

o 
o 

w 


S3 

o 

O 
(fl 

u 

0> 
Xi 

o 

PI 

a3 
a> 

CD 

o 


a 

"cS 


3 

ft 

o 

CD 

u 
o 


vi 

o 

<D 
H 


58 Oakville 


$ c. 

571 43 
449 18 
821 44 
808 47 
642 35 
666 21 
748 59 
741 39 
874 65 


$ c. 

628 62 

449 18 

1,200 00 

1,802 97 

642 35 

666 21 

748 59 

1,952 01 

2,574 63 

900 00 


$ c. 

2,200 00 
889 15 
1,300 00 
2,900 00 
3,100 00 
1,750 00 
4,837 79 
2,600 00 
3,200 00 


$ c. 

490 00 
130 00 
1,301 85 
652 75 
106 42 
898 40 

'"nh'bo 


c. 

396 85 

36 00 

909 16 

453 66 

115 20 

209 90 

26 82 

3,734 84 

2,024 86 


$ c. 

4,286 90 
1,953 51 
5,532 45 
6.617 85 
4,606 32 
4,190 72 
6,361 79 
9,154 24 
8,674 14 
900 00 
5,085 78 
1,828 01 
3,197 20 
6,050 50 
4,163 98 

2.178 55 
3,258 06 
2,722 90 
7,000 00 

11,144 57 
5,145 33 
4,188 14 
2,748 74 
2,856 53 
3,336 29 
3,418 99 

3.179 64 
3,659 04 

38,533 78 

6,244 24 

3.424 36 
2,139 74 
5,055 47 
1,731 29 
2,236 88 
3,441 79 
5,224 84 
5,886 31 
2,982 24 
5,734 63 
6,485 81 


8 c. 

3,267 30 
1,516 66 
4,312 00 
4,728 62 
3,450 00 
3,065 00 
3,645 10 
4 116 01 


59 Omemee 


60 Orangeville 


61 Oshawa 


62 Paris 


63 Parkhill 


64 Pembroke 


65 Petrolea 


66 Picton 

67 Plantagenet 


4,776 67 
555 00 


68 Port Arthur 


1,279 68 
455 50 
560 79 
880 39 
631 00 
413 16 
627 61 
550 85 


3,600 00 

627 65 

1,100 00 

2,366 28 

2,028 26 

1,190 03 

2,025 00 

300 00 

1,000 00 

3,995 00 

2,207 73 

3,138 16 

925 00 

649 35 

300 00 




206 20 
289 36 
213 00 


2,910 00 
1,440 00 
2,265 40 
4 727 56 


69 Port Dover 


455 50 
795 16 
1,938 33 
871 00 
575 36 
406 73 
880 09 




70 Port Elgin 


528 25 
865 50 
375 75 


71 Port Hope 


72 Port Perry 


257 97 


3,230 00 
1 350 00 


73 Port Rowan 


74 Prescott 


119 00 
807 50 


79 72 

184 46 

6,000 00 

5,130 25 

44 79 

75 00 

681 35 

498 27 

1,215 67 

320 86 

140 21 

777 28 

2,682 99 

1,508 38 

134 07 
563 14 
526 74 
366 61 


2 386 64 


75 Richmond Hill 


1 909 57 


76 Rockland , 


600 00 


77 Sault Ste. Marie 


1,094 32 
787 66 
730 48 
457 39 
522 15 
443 62 
588 33 
506 70 
605 88 


"'2,68915' 


925 00 

16 00 

244 50 


3,225 00 


78 Simcoe 


4,055 00 
3,670 00 
1,450 00 
1 963 90 


79 Smith's Falls... 


80 Smithville 


685 00 
836 76 
1,150 00 
2,100 00 
632 73 
605 88 


81 Stirling 


350 00 
227 00 
409 80 


82 Streetsville 


1,730 00 
2,469 54 
1,800 00 
2 305 22 


83 Sydenham 


84 Thorold 


1,900 00 

1,300 00 

31,281 00 

3,458 88 

1,000 00 
550 00 

1,900 00 
275 00 
450 00 
800 00 
600 00 

1,800 00 
700 00 

1,700 00 

3,582 04 


85 Tillsonburg 


370 00 
4,599 79 

39 00 

693 25 


86 Toronto Technical 


28,006 63 
3,106 88 
2,755 00 


87 Trenton 


682 19 

*705 91 
438 30 
755 03 
435 29 
509 69 
610 70 
673 74 
666 68 
540 19 
577 44 
638 02 


555 79 

891 13 

588 30 

1,111 95 

435 29 

909 69 

1,290 95 

1,781 05 

1,705 21 

700 00 

652 19 

818 05 


88 Uxbridge 


89 Vienna 


1 243 93 


90 Walkerton 


761 75 
219 10 
367 50 


3,980 00 


91 Wardsville 


1,189 83 


92 Waterdown 


1,840 00 


93 Waterford 


740 14 
1,794 05 
1,714 42 

473 05 
2,459 00 
1,447 70 


2,520 78 


94 Watford 


376 00 


2,867 50 


95 Welland 


3,100 00 


96 Weston 


569 00 
346 00 


2,266 65 


97 Wiarton 


2,549 43 


98 Williamstown 


2,896 50 








1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals. Collegiate Institutes 


62,857 67 
58,781 18 


94,323 18 
60,630 27 


207,064 78 
334,559 36 


42,403 12 
86,483 38 


86,638 98 
62,524 31 


493,287 73 
602,978 50 


293,726 28 
372, 121 10 


3 Grand totals, 1905 


121,638 85 
120,799 49 


154,953 45 
148,271 87 


541,624 14 
447,734 04 


128,886 50 
116,758 04 


149,163 29 
127,304 71 


1,096,266 23 
960,867 65 


666,547 38 


4 " 1904 


620,710 27 






5 Increases 


839 36 


6,682 08 


93,890 10 


12,128 46 


21,858 58 


135,398 58 


45,837 11 


6 Decreases 




















7 Percentages 


11.1 


14.13 


49.40 


11.76 


13.61 




66.36 









* Grant ($50.00) lor Cadet corps included. Cottper pupil, enrolled attendance, $35.05: 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



39 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued. 
Statement. — Concluded. 



Expenditure. 




5 
£ 

p. 

W 

Si 

'w p 

pq 


6 

a 
s 

o 

03 

"o 

O 
-C 
o 

2« 
g§ 


go** 

> - . 2 ° 
it** 


0.0 

0) <£ 
C X 

C 

33 O 

=J 5 

M | 
BO "2 

.a c . 

O 53 CO 

O y O 

■° * S 

„ .J 

US' 

CO 


6 
S 



O 

5 
"3 


Charges per year for tuition. 

• 


$ c. 
58 1(54 25 


$ c. 
128 00 


$ c 

42 57 
65 56 
166 32 
136 83 
98 14 
85 00 
160 59 
117 03 
198 75 
97 56 
180 00 
39 93 


$ c. 

684 78 
327 10 
734 62 
934 39 
703 80 
498 56 
911 38 
652 02 
964 44 
97 75 
564 09 
246 40 
484 75 

1,005 66 
449 25 
301 87 
738 83 
512 59 
284 00 
674 82 
722 75 
417 20 
258 48 
492 65 
240 45 
349 94 
483 11 
767 78 

6,79?. 15 

917 30 

526 94 
168 25 
576 76 
498 58 
234 86 
602 59 
902 70 
683 04 
393 59 
2,876 80 
2,742 61 


8 e. 

4,286 90 
1,942 32 
5,436 04 
5,896 37 
4,606 32 
3.694 85 
6,361 79 
5,274 32 
6,196 00 
822 79 
4,597 77 
1,828 01 
2,750 15 
6,050 50 
4,148 80 
2,178 55 
3,209 04 
2,528 01 
7,000 00 
9,605 02 
5,145 33 

4.188 14 
2,009 83 
2,622 45 
2,213 87 
3,215 82 
•2.533 64 
3,493 01 

38,563 78 

5,650 11 

3,364 66 
1,628 53 
4,688 41 
1,725 31 

2.189 76 
3,164 80 
3,770 20 
4,246 72 
2,826 27 
5,734 61 
5,684 36 


8 e. 


$5 ; $8. 


59 33 00 


11 19 

96 41 

721 48 

" ' 495*87' 


H.S. D. free ; others $10. 


60 223 10 




Town $9 ; others §10 


61 

62 217, 00 

64 1,640 7?" 

65 3*9 26 


96 53 

137 38 

46 29 

3 95 


Form I free ; other* $7.50. 
Res. and Co. free ; others $20. 
86 ; $8 ; $10. 
Free. 


3,879 92 

2,478 14 

77 21 

488 01 


Free. 


66 165 20 

67 59 16 

68 880 23 

69 101 68 


90 94 
13 32 
63 45 


Free. 
Free. 
Free. 
Free. 


70 




447 05 

"15 is 


Village $6.50 ; Co. $10. 


71 




317 28 

6 85 
, 30 00 

33 87 

1 00 

150 00 

63 33 

249 09 

82 74 

63 06 

8 50 

210 88 

47 60 

118 07 

10 43 

2,955 12 

120 00 

18 82 

130 00 

131 65 

7 59 
15 70 
28 42 


Co. free ; town and others $9. 


72 462 70 




F. I free ; others $7.50. 


73 209 80 


286 88 
49 70 


Free. 


74 

75 104 85 


49 02 

194 89 


Res. free ; non-res. 85. 

$10. 

Free. 


76 5,966 00 

77 5 641 87 






1,539 55 


$10. 

H.S.D. and Co. free ; others $10. 

Res. fret ; Co. $5 ; others $10. 


78 


118 49 
18 20 

192 29 
12 20 
32 54 

126 74 
40 01 
31 93 

777 38 

694 43 
63 90 


79 




80 46 00 

81 145 20 

82 

83 222 00 

84 92 45 

85 377 65 

86 26 50 


738 91 
234 08 
1,122 42 
203 17 
646 00 
166 C3 


Free . 

$10. 

$5. 

Res. 85 ; non-res. $6. 

Free. 

H.S.D. 1st year free ; others $6. 

1st year free ; 2nd year $9 ; 3rd yr. $15 ; 


87 811 50 

88 

89 86 35 


594 13 

59 70 

511 21 

367 16 

5 98 

47 12 

276 99 

1,454 64 

1,639 59 

155 97 

02 

801 45 


special students $2 per subject. 
Town free ; Co. and adjoining Cos. 65 i 

of cost of maintenance : others $10. 
Res. $5 ; Co. and others $7.50. 
Free. 


90 




$10. 


91 

92 20 00 

93 

94 


29 31 
79 20 
13 01 


Res. $7.50 ; others $10. 

$5. 

Free. 

Res. and non-res. $10; Co. free. 


95 304 60 

96 95 23 

97 64 70 
98 


135 25 
33 03 

143 32 
45 25 


23 83 
37 77 
100 36 


Free. 

$10. 

$5. 








1 45.740 61 

2 57,774 47 


8,512 29 
11,036 42 


12,255 13 
10,755 86 


75,975 31 
115,900 77 


436,209 62 
568,288 62 


57,078 11 
34,689 88 


48 free ; 50 not free. 
9 free ; 33 not free. 


3 103,515 08 

4 50,512 10 


19,548 71 
22,481 91 


23,010 99 
15,128 93 


191,876 08 
168,254 24 


1,004,498 24 
877,087 45 


91,767 99 
83,780 20 


57 free ; 83 not free. 
56 free ; 82 not free. 


5 53,002 98 




7,882 06 


23,621 84 


127,410 79 


7,987 79 




6 


2,933 20 
















7 10.30 


1.95 


2.29 


19.10 






40.71 i free ; 59.29 <k not free 











average attendance, $57.18. 



40 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I.— Attendance. Pupils in the Schools 





Pupils. 


Number of 
pupils in— 


Number of 
pupils from— 


Occupation of 


Collegiate Institutes. 

• 


02 
>, 
O 
PQ 


so 

3 


3 

o 


6 

V 

a 
ci 
■O 

3 

«a 

o 
be 

> 

< 


o 

o 
A 
o 
w 
u 
9 
o 


o 
o 
A 
o 

OS 

0> 

t3 

•p 


o 
o 

A 

u 
<o 

& 
a 
P 


0) 

A 

be 

•s.s 

Kg 
|o 

II 

■a* 


A 

'a 

en 

OS'S 

o o 


<V 

3 

o 

o 

u 

<z> 
A 

6 




CD 

. a 

a 


24 

73 

132 

128 

61 

143 

43 

71 

102 

67 

35 

124 

320 

50 

215 

102 

362 

24 

58 

79 

103 

195 

124 

43 

80 

74 

42 

98 

5s 

103 

106 

31 

115 

42 

292 

160 

313 

105 

17 

28 

123 

131 


o5 

"3 

bio 
< 

95 
87 
36 
99 
68 

129 
60 
55 

101 
64 

110 
66 

109 
88 
83 

106 

157 

113 

116 
62 
77 
37 

159 
74 
48 

105 
86 
43 

120 

119 
50 

136 
85 
77 
2 
2 
13 
56 

130 
69 
42 
91 


00 

a 


V 





(H 

Oh 


DO 

s 

"3 

O 

O 

"3 
c 

cJ 
A 
<y 


1 Aylmer 


85 
124 
148 
183 
168 
215 

18 

74 
126 
133 
101 
131 
388 

94 
268 
158 
521 
117 
122 
130 
131 
411 
219 

96 
179 
122 
102 
144 
106 
202 
145 
113 
166 

79 
306 
194 
311 
162 

77 

70 
135 
153 


84 
130 
136 
197 
188 
250 

89 

86 
133 
171 
167 
183 
495 
109 
343 
178 
513 
117 
157 
185 
174 
346 
246 
119 
187 
166 
110 
199 
171 
259 
180 
117 
197 
100 
387 
251 
294 
158 
129 

93 
218 
195 


169 
254 
284 
380 
356 
465 
177 
160 
259 
304 
268 
314 
883 
203 
611 
336 
1,034 
234 
279 
315 
305 
757 
465 
215 
366 
288 
212 
343 
277 
461 
325 
230 
363 
179 
693 
445 
605 
320 
20« 
163 
353 
348 


104 
154 
177 
237 
218 
305 
104 
102 
150 
179 
164 
190 
537 
119 
377 
200 
617 
150 
176 
183 
182 
479 
293 
134 
246 
159 
114 
184 
180 
298 
215 
139 
233 
113 
432 
284 
362 
193 
131 
97 
•227 
211 


82 
131 
185 
235 
233 
305 
110 
108 
164 
204 
116 
211 
507 
152 
355 
176 
677 

85 
160 
231 
185 
585 
254 
165 
284 
188 
138 
247 
131 
341 
248 
125 
226 
122 
469 
327 
417 
206 
139 

96 
280 
251 


63 

102 

79 

106 

87 

138 

51 

42 

74 

90 

120 

69 

253 

29 

229 

127 

254 

110 

90 

57 

96 

135 

147 

32 

56 

86 

60 

73 

115 

100 

54 

74 

104 

* 51 

171 

So 

143 

90 

52 

51 

51 

63 


24 
21 
20 
39 
36 
22 
16 
10 
21 
10 
32 
34 

123 
22 
27 
33 

103 
39 
29 
27 
24 
37 
64 
18 
26 
14 
14 
23 
31 
20 
23 
31 
33 
6 
53 
33 
45 
24 
15 
16 
22 
34 


68 
154 
153 
275 
274 
326 

98 

92 
165 
181 
165 
247 
719 

99 
514 
208 
831 

91 
144 
242 
159 
662 
271 
130 
310 
131 

82 
221 
134 
342 
240 

96 
267 

99 
688 
432 
563 
205 

68 

93 
278 
213 


100 
96 

122 
97 
76 

138 
78 
68 
55 

100 

101 
56 

108 
70 
87 
99 

186 

138 

129 
53 
87 
63 

141 
81 
50 

144 

124 

109 
66 

119 
76 

116 
79 
77 
5 
10 
28 
35 

118 
69 
72 

125 


i 

4 
9 
8 
6 
1 
1 

"39 

23 

2 

11 

65 

34 

10 

29 

17 

5 

6 

20 

59 

32 

53 

4 

6 

13 

6 

13 

77 

"*9 

18 
17 
3 

"*3 

14 
80 
20 
1 
3 
10 


18 
26 
46 
34 
21 
67 
17 
10 
16 
14 
30 
48 
95 
16 
90 
32 
92 
13 
36 
33 
39 

117 
36 
22 
64 
13 
8 
22 
27 
17 
36 
9 
35 
21 

116 
25 
99 
32 
10 
20 
27 
29 


24 
40 
31 

87 


2 Barrie 


3 Berlin 


4 Brantford 


5 Brockville 

6 Chatham 


121 
91 
37 


7 Clinton 


8 Cobourg 




9 Collingwood 

10 Gait 


9 
133 


11 Goderich 


85 


12 Guelph 


53 


13 Hamilton 


261 


14 Ingersoll 


43 


15 Kingston 


136 


16 Lindsav 


48 


17 London 

18 Morrisburg 


34Z 

44 


19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 


40 
56 


21 Orillia 


55 


22 Ottawa 


310 


23 Owen Sound 


81 


24 Perth 


52 


25 Peterborough 


96 


26 Renfrew 


59 


27 Ridgetown 


22 


28 St. Catharines 


42 


29 St. Mary's 


44 


30 St. Thomas 


133 


31 Sarnia 


102 


32 Seaf orth 


32 


33 Stratford 


111 


34 Strathroy 


19 


35 Toronto (Harbord) 

36 " (Jameson; 

37 " (Jarvis) 

38 Toronto Junction 

39 VankleekHill 


198 
140 

149 

32 


40 Whitbv 


31 


41 Windsor 


131 


42 Woodstock 


46 






Totals 


6,997 


8,207 


15,204 


9,349 


9,851 


4,059 


1,294 


10,721 


3,751 


732 


4,596 


3,425 


1,573 


3,638 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



41 



HIGH SCHOOLS. — Continued. 
and in the Various Subjects, etc. — 





Parents. 








Number of Pupils in the various subjects. 








O 

a 
Q, 

5 

V 

o 
be 

o 

<a 
_! 





u 

a 
5 


5 
3 

'3 

c 

E.H 

82 

si & 

art 

bo 

W 


s- 

"3 

<u 

a 

"bo 

c 
W 




3 

5 

-5 

cj 

a 
O 


O 
M 


1 

>. 

u 



5 
< 


O 

X 
"3 

B 

-3 

ZJ 

3 




X 

5 

0) 

'O 




ac 


0> 


be 

5 


5 

m 

s 

B 

< 


si 

% 

be 

< 


1 


8 
15 
38 
18 
73 
27 
14 
20 
31 
11 

5 
17 

7 

2 
41 
16 
34 
17 
14 
61 

4 
22 
33 

6 
58 
22 
14 
40 
21 
65 
20 
16 

3 
13 

"'88 

"'21 

13 
14 
15 
14 


'"i3 
1 

14 
12 

8 
6 

"is 

3 
11 
91 

4 
46 
32 
47 
23 
15 
24 
27 
76 
32 
18 
20 
15 
40 
98 

7 
24 
11 

6 
14 

7 
85 
30 
40 
29 

4 

1 

15 
37 


152 
234 
280 
335 
326 
305 
157 
150 
243 
294 
236 
280 
748 
191 
512 
336 
931 
204 
210 
288 
196 
723 
401 
206 
310 
188 
202 
32# 
131 
441 
309 
166 
363 
176 
672 
425 
541 
296 
202 
155 
279 
314 


169 
.254 
280 
367 
350 
465 
173 
160 
256 
304 
252 
314 
845 
200 
608 
336 
990 
234 
270 
312 
289 
757 
465 
215 
360 
288 
212 
343 
269 
461 
318 
220 
343 
179 
693 
440 
588 
312 
206 
161 
350 
348 


169 
254 
280 
367 
350 
465 
174 
160 
256 
304 
252 
314 
847 
200 
608 
336 
990 
230 
271 
312 
289 
753 
465 
215 
360 
288 
212 
343 
269 
461 
318 
218 
360 
178 
693 
440 
588 
312 
206 
161 
222 
340 


145 
247 
265 
209 
29b 
320 
146 
150 
221 
166 
236 
280 
760 
191 
324 
226 
677 
204 
195 
288 
203 
601 
359 
206 
306 
138 
202 
320 
253 
278 
257 
196 
360 
170 
428 
364 
223 
296 
136 
155 
171 
314 


152 
254 
130 
228 
316 
342 
146 
150 
228 
134 
236 
234 
868 
200 
350 
330 
990 
193 
171 
288 
157 
470 
424 
210 
306 
152 
212 
270 
261 
175 
263 
162 
360 
175 
425 
442 
555 
313 
117 
161 
187 
340 


83 
168 

60 
128 
101 
138 

92 

52 






145 
186 
209 
265 
298 
342 
159 
108 
194 
164 
102 
211 
539 
191 
45« 
226 
677 
204 
183 
208 
240 
529 
364 
206 
340 
188 
202 
320 
168 
283 
267 
112 
200 
170 
590 
367 
347 
247 
176 
110 
167 
286 


140 
167 
229 
272 
316 
443 

88 
108 
179 
247 
110 
211 
507 
152 
512 
226 
677 
234 
190 
231 
180 
580 
213 
150 
280 
188 
138 
270 
131 
286 
230 
125 
243 
122 
576 
365 
464 
247 
123 

96 
225 
251 


153 
219 
272 
335 
316 
305 
160 
150 
236 
294 
252 
280 
756 
191 
548 
323 
93i 
204 
240 
288 
207 
718 
401 
205 
340 
188 
202 
320 
131 
441 
309 
199 
330 
176 
672 
397 
532 
305 
199 
147 
314 
314 


162 


? 






226 


3 
4 






260 
365 


5 






298 


r, 






342 


7 
8 




11 


173 
160 


9 


78 






211 


ID 


122 
142 
103 
363 
49 
153 
160 






225 


11 
IV 






201 
230 


13 






838 


14 






183 


1". 






507 


Ifi 






256 


17 


313 






813 


IS 


149 

104 

84 

109 

110 

197 

41 

78 

100 

74 

86 

139 

120 

67 

95 

97 

70 

147 

112 






230 


19 






240 


?,(] 






312 


21 
99 




9 


250 
755 


.... 






400 


?4 






213 


25 

"f, 




306 


399 

238 


•»7 






144 


v>S 






340 


?q 






269 


so 






337 


SI 






287 


3? 






208 


33 






335 


34 






170 


35 






693 


36 






432 


37 


184 
74 






592 


38 






256 


39 


67 
40 
65 
97 






180 


40 






161 


41 






217 


i'?, 






205 










971 


1,001 


13,428 


14,956 


14,830 


11,487 


12,077 


4,811 




326 


10,946 


10,702 


13,500 


13,313 



42 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 



II.— TABLE I.— Attendance, Pupils in the Schools 



Collegiate Institutes. 



1 Aylmer 

2 Barrie 

3 Berlin 

4 Brantford 

5 Brockville 

6 Chatham 

7 Clinton 

8 Cobourg 

9 Collingwood 

10 Gait 

11 Goderich 

12 Guelph 

13 Hamilton 

14 Ingersoh 

15 Kingston , 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 

21 Orillia 

22 Ottawa 

23 Owen Sound 

24 Perth 

25 Peterborough 

26 Renfrew 

27 Ridgetown 

28 St. Catharines 

29 St. Mary's 

30 St. Thomas 

31 Sarnia 

32 Seaforth 

33 Stratford 

34 Strathioy 

35 Toronto (Harbord) 

36 Toronto (Jameson) 

37 Toronto (Jarvis) 

38 Toronto Junction... 

39 Vankleek Hill 

40 Whitby 

41 Windsor 

42 Woodstock 

Totais 



Number of Pupils in the 



162 
175 
189 
358 
189 
335 
173 
162 
211 
164 
200 
230 
838 
140 
499 
211 
670 
230 
137 
106 
198 
421 
400 
167 
266 
238 
144 
231 
264 
235 
170 
159 
233 
130 
693 
424 
588 
166 
146 
161 
141 
205 



11,159 



1,107 



110 
167 

57 
318 
230 
235 

72 

99 
115 
176 
115 
197 
562 
141 
444 
166 
772 
165 
193 
168 
120 
709 
270 
141 
170 
150 

54 
157 
189 
103 
152 
149 
104 
110 
680 
428 
581 
144 
125 

73 
179 
202 



9,498 



2 
30 

166 
81 
72 
37 
12 
12 
16 
49 
55 
61 

208 
2 

109 
22 
64 
24 
39 
14 
28 

103 
17 
21 
32 
21 
8 
54 
41 
26 
28 
32 

159 
16 

288 

232 

160 
45 
7 
15 
34 
39 



2,481 



149 
186 
107 
242 
269 
281 
142 
112 
176 
166 
118 
205 
770 
117 
407 
189 
548 
191 
205 
185 
209 
605 
316 
156 
170 
149 
138 
172 
250 
205 
191 
198 
264 
155 
648 
402 
517 
209 
149 
123 
174 
211 



10,376 



445 





9 


4 




9 


65 


6 


82 


13 


43 




68 



26 

9 
26 
110 
124 
165 
166 
422 
12 
129 
200 



78 
135 
217 
114 

7 
219 

3 
404 
12 
331 
112 
106 

1 
185 
150 



1,616 



5 

166 

107 

181 

108 

188 

71 

54 

171 

170 

65 

82 

548 

68 

56 

100 

603 

109 

124 

165 

166 

438 

234 

107 

200 

50 

7 

74 

135 

217 

114 

7 

219 

3 

404 

14 

346 

112 

106 

110 

185 

151 



6,540 



87 

177 
97 

152 
95 

107 
42 
98 
81 
94 

162 
65 

257 
59 

103 
96 

268 

149 
96 
75 

149 

140 

396 
39 
75 
54 
68 
90 

240 

103 
56 
87 

319 
20 

157 
85 

133 
89 
54 

150 
54 



5.010 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



43 



HIGH SCHOOLS. -Continued. 



and in the various Subjects, etc. — Continued. 



various Subjects.— Continued. 





bo 

.5 


bib 
C 

'5 

a> 
a> 
M 
■M 
O 
o 
cq 


u 
bo 
O 

a 

CO 


fao 
a 

* 
p. 
H 


< 


d 

o 

"5 
o 

"3 

o 

6H 


Special Courses. 


O 
1 

a 


u 

9 

B 

a 

o 
o - 


ho 
c 
d 

'3 
u 

H 

5 


© 

o 
d 
.2 
o 

CO 

2 

o 

w 
O 

W 


oS 

a 

a 
g 

o 

'd 

c 

05 
_o 

a 

3 
< 


< 


1 


82 
106 
162 
192 
196 
253 

46 
108 
132 
183 
115 
130 
760 

90 
114 
176 
677 

85 
118 
100 
150 
458 
230 

45 
263 

96 

77 
183 

67 
226 
156 
125 
226 

78 
428 
365 
237 
173 

78 

92 
135 
130 

7,813 


82 
123 
154 
150 
196 
253 

88 
108 
132 
125 
111 
130 
175 

18 
172 
176 
544 

90 
160 
175 
150 
252 
221 
109 
255 

92 

77 
183 
128 
226 
136 

64 
142 

85 

19 
354 
226 
109 

92 
100 
150 
144 






82 

107 

154 

185 

176 

182 

82 

75 

179 

119 

97 

50 

279 

48 

72 

176 

454 

111 

190 

191 

180 

417 

230 

151 

"*66 
90 

18 
167 
177 
116 
64 
66 
140 
429 
365 
337 
148 
106 
105 
241 
120 


145 
252 
213 

235 

"*443 
161 
160 
241 
284 
232 
280 
750 
200 

"'326 
758 
190 
222 
231 
270 
735 
274 
212 
350 
288 
202 
330 
254 
461 
292 
200 








26 




2 


71 
84 
76 
45 

123 
55 

108 
56 
80 
68 
80 
50 
22 
88 
49 

167 
33 
80 

129 
42 
62 
36 


23 
30 
68 
48 
123 
50 
45 
36 
86 
41 
80 
15 
15 
92 
49 
58 
30 
40 
49 
50 
82 
34 










3 


86 
76 
48 

123 
4 
45 
25 
78 
40 
80 
20 
10 
85 
49 

167 

22 

2 

125 


113 
112 


142 
80 


20 
68 
45 

138 
44 
26 
55 
45 

114 
69 

100 
39 
47 
41 

138 

114 
39 
23 
76 
40 

137 




4 

5 


18 


6 








7 








8 


30 






9 . 






10 








11 . 








12 . 




32 

382 
75 




13 . 


328 

63 

175 




14 




15 


52 


16 






17 


165 


340 




J8 




19 8 








20 








21 








22 


64 
42 








23 








24 








25 


91 

47 

45 

112 

50 

124 

106 

14 

90 

28 


30 
48 
45 
57 
6 
90 
67 
29 
75 
35 


102 
50 
66 

112 
51 
71 
67 
18 






30 
86 
57 
37 
110 
100 
36 
58 
30 
53 
17 
18 




26 


43 


25 




27 




28 








29 








30 








31 








32 








33 


92 


116 




34 


170 
439 
417 
560 

'"i88 
163 
261 
296 


8 




35 








36 














37 














38 


61 
22 
25 
136 

72 


61 

28 

"'72 
50 


61 
22 






29 

52 
15 
30 
12 




39 








40 








41 


131 
34 






44 


42 


113 




10 










6,476 


2,627 


1,837 


6,742 


11,685 


1,984 


1,234 


1,192 


2,214 


124 



44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools 





Pupils. 


Number of Pupils in 


Number of Pupils from 


High Schools. 


OS 

o 

M 


3 


3 

o 
H 


a 

2 
<c 

S 

< 
to 

aj 
U 

> 
< 


o 

"o 
•0 
u 
<v 

o 


o 

o 

o 

<X/ 

i 


o 
o 
,c 
o 

Of 

u 

a 
o. 



bo 

M 

in — 

<V> O 
•£ O 

£-£ 

33 




n 

"a. 

so 


09 

9 

3 



£1 
O 


1 Alexandria 


65 
58 
57 
62 
83 
44 
27 

121 
59 
75 
95 
29 
50 
79 
69 
39 
53 
36 

143 
34 
78 
65 
74 
58 
26 
43 
70 
59 
41 
54 
68 
57 
33 
37 
63 
62 
26 
70 
95 
40 
97 
61 
87 
85 
37 

135 
65 
38 
66 
59 
82 
26 
67 
18 
33 
44 
88 


82 
78 
86 
78 

122 
65 
30 

148 
85 
73 
77 
44 
81 
93 
90 
44 
56 
35 

168 
67 
66 
86 

131 
40 
51 
77 
72 
69 
47 
86 
85 
51 
43 
43 
60 
58 
32 
89 

124 
43 

105 
89 
78 
76 
41 

110 
96 
48 
54 
75 
68 
41 
68 
32 
43 
61 
80 


147 
136 
143 
140 
205 
109 

57 
269 
144 
148 
172 

73 
131 
172 
159 

83 
109 

71 
311 
101 
144 
151 
205 

98 

77 
120 
142 
128 

88 
140 
153 
108 

76 

80 
123 
120 

58 
159 
219 

83 
202 
150 
165 
161 

78 
245 
161 

86 
120 
134 
150 

67 
135 

50 

76 
105 
168 


89 
85 
83 
92 

130 
62 
32 

152 
90 
90 

118 
40 
80 

100 

105 
51 
70 
44 

197 
69 
91 
90 

131 
54 
49 
86 
82 
76 
46 
94 
94 
66 
44 
46 
80 
80 
37 

103 

145 
50 

132 
91 

106 

110 
54 

144 

103 
50 
77 
88 

104 
38 
79 
24 
34 
65 

105 


116 
70 
96 
89 

109 
69 
35 

192 
72 
91 
98 
50 
79 

130 
82 
50 
58 
28 

214 
60 
96 

105 
84 
75 
36 
61 
80 
68 
71 
95 

110 
53 
47 
60 
83 
51 
42 

107 

106 
68 

119 
87 
91 
91 
38 

143 
78 
56 
65 
77 
78 
42 
92 
40 
54 
78 

110 


31 
59 
40 
41 
86 
33 
22 
62 
57 
57 
48 
23 
43 
34 
65 
27 
42 
43 
70 
30 
48 
38 
84 
19 
27 
37 
42 
48 
15 
39 
35 
44 
27 
20 
34 
52 
10 
40 
87 
14 
69 
55 
50 
49 
35 
68 
67 
25 
55 
50 
72 
25 
43 
10 
22 
21 
58 


7 

7 

10 

10 

7 

""i5 

15 

' ' '26 

"*9 

8 

12 

6 

9 

"*27 
11 

8 

37 

4 

14 

22 

20 

12 

2 

6 

" 8 

11 
2 

6 

17 

6 
12 
26 

1 
14 

8 
24 
21 

5 
34 
16 

5 

"'7 

'"6 


127 
93 

123 
64 
82 
50 
26 

221 
76 
57 
81 
31 
43 

105 

121 
27 
72 
37 

154 
72 
86 
95 
64 
65 
42 
52 
74 
63 
85 

106 
52 
34 
75 
35 
58 
60 
34 
63 
63 
80 

101 
66 

146 
61 
39 
25 
63 
66 
64 
83 
45 
24 
74 
36 
42 

101 
65 


12 
32 

3 
75 
119 
57 
31 
46 
62 
87 
87 
42 
66 
59 
25 
56 
24 
34 
133 
17 
58 
47 
128 
31 
35 
67 
66 
65 

2 

24 
64 
71 

1 
21 
65 
24 
23 
75 
78 

3 
99 
71 

""'98 
39 

198 
82 
19 
54 
16 

101 
43 
57 
14 
34 
4 
79 


8 


2 Almonte 


11 


3 Arnprior 


17 


4 Arthur 


1 


5 Athens 


4 


6 Aurora 


2 


7 Beamsville 




8 Belleville 


2 




6 


10 Bradford 


4 


11 Brampton 


4 


12 Brighton 




13 Caledonia 


22 


14 Campbellford 


8 


15 Carleton Place 


13 


16 Cayuga 




17 Cheslev 


13 


18 Colbome 




19 Cornwall 


24 


20 Deseronto 


12 


21 Dundas 




22 Dunnville 


9 


23 Dutton 


13 


24 East Toronto 


2 


25 Elora 




26 Essex 


1 


27 Fergus 


2 


28 Forest 




29 Fort William 


1 


30 Gananoque 


10 


31 Georgetown .... 


37 


32 Glencoe 


3 


33 Gravenhurst 




34 Grimsby 


24 


35 Hagersvil le 






36 


37 Hawkesburv 


1 


38 Iroquois 


21 


39 Kemptville 


78 


40 Kenora 






2 


42 Leamington 


13 


43 Listowel . , 


19 


44 Lucan 


2 


45 Madoc 




46 Markham 


22 


47 Meafordl 


16 


48 Midland 


1 


49 Mitchell 


2 


50 Mount Forest 


35 


51 Newburgh ...- 


4 


12 Newcastle 




53 Newmarket 


4 


54 Niagara , 




55 Niagara Falls South 




56 North Bay 






24 







19(M 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



45 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS. — Continued. 

and in the various subjects, etc. — Continued. 







Occupation of Parents. 






Number 


of Pupils in the various subjects 
















o 

3 
C. 

o 

o 
o 


K 
O 

CL 

o 


DO 

fcc 


£ 
S 


5 

O 

c 
p. 


u 

g 


O 

GO 


o 


u 

o 


o 


© 






c 
i- 

V. 

33 


e 

o 

s 

s 




3 
5 


2 

s 

o 


"5 

5 
o 

V 


O 

be 
o 


"5 
o 
u 
a; 


a 

o 

.22 

"So 


c . 

O V 

£i2 


3 

XI 
a: 

"be 

a 


X 
c 

=5 

c 

d 


so 

5 


'5 


> 
o 


n 

3 

O 


a. 
ad 

i 


•1 




u 




< 


CL, 


s 


•J 


O 


^ 


w 


w 


O 


pq 


< 


2 


S 


O 


M 


"^ 


1 


15 


99 


2 


18 


13 




147 


147 


147 


147 


147 


31 






147 


147 


147 


2 


23 


51 


9 


42 


5 


6 


130 


128 


128 


128 


133 


39 






118 


103 


13C 


3 


43 


30 





37 


22 


6 


136 


140 


140 


29 


140 


44 






136 


96 


136 


4 


SMI 


76 


1 


14 


7 


12 


130 


140 


140 


130 


140 


51 






130 


100 


82 




••in 


128 


12 


20 


13 


2 


195 


203 


204 


195 


203 


94 






190 


107 


195 


6 


','1 


44 


8 


21 


9 


6 


10 


102 


109 


109 


109 


40 






109 


109 


102 




9 

MS 


24 
36 


6 
38 


11 

88 


5 
8 


2 

1 


57 
254 


57 
269 


57 

2t>9 


57 
192 


57 
269 


22 
77 






54 

192 


40 
269 




8 






254 


9 


14 


70 


12 


17 


23 


8 


135 


140 


140 


129 


140 


57 


li 


11 


122 


100 


135 


10 


28 

vs 


86 
42 


11 
22 


12 
35 


11 
33 


'"l2 


148 
142 


148 
172 


148 

170 


130 
142 


148 
170 


52 
54 






135 

156 


91 
102 


148 


11 






156 


12 


9 

14 
44 


40 
87 
72 


5 
7 
10 


7 
10 
20 


12 
9 
16 


"i 
10 


73 
79 
164 


73 
128 
172 


73 
128 
172 


50 
122 
164 


73 
128 
172 


23 

52 
52 






50 
128 
164 


50 
79 
120 


73 
79 
164 


13 






14 






15 


41 
14 


33 

45 


25 
4 


44 
16 


12 
3 


1 
1 


82 

78 


157 
82 


157 
82 


147 
78 


100 
82 


23 

32 






100 
73 


100 
60 


82 

78 


16 






17 


R? 


36 


13 


20 


6 


2 


100 


108 


108 


99 


107 


50 






92 


58 


98 


18 


8 
76 


35 
90 


6 
35 


5 
60 


7 
38 


ro 

12 


71 
300 


71 
307 


71 
307 


54 

214 


54 
191 


35 
93 






54 

2*0 


36 
307 


71 


19 






300 


m 


"1 


31 


8 


25 


11 


5 


72 


101 


101 


72 


101 


41 






90 


72 


72 


21 


32 


31 


10 


48 


7 


16 


144 


144 


144 


144 


144 


48 


48 


144 


132 


96 


144 


?,?. 


4fi 


44 


12 


33 


12 


4 


143 


151 


151 


104 


151 


39 






107 


105 


144 


23 


12 
25 


107 
9 


20 
13 


21 
37 


32 

3 


13 
11 


168 
98 


205 

98 


205 
98 


168 
98 


205 
98 


121 

23 






168 

75 


84 
75 


168 
98 


24 






?5 


21 


24 


3 


11 


14 


4 


70 


77 


74 


57 


76 


37 






70 


46 


70 


26 


32 
27 


63 
61 


14 
17 


6 

8 


4 
9 


1 
20 


97 
120 


119 

136 


119 
136 


97 
122 


115 
122 


90 
58 






97 
129 


60 
80 


97 
120 


27 






?8 


20 


57 


11 


Q 


16 


15 


119 


126 


126 


119 


85 


58 






95 


85 


72 


29 


54 
28 


2 
33 


6 
20 


14 
59 


5 


7 


88 
138 


88 
140 


88 
140 


88 
95 


88 
140 


17 
45 






88 
95 


71 
95 


88 
138 


30 






31 


3fi 


69 


15 


25 


6 


2 


145 


149 


149 


145 


145 


38 






145 


110 


145 


3? 


l ( t 


56 


11 


14 


8 




98 


108 


108 


108 


108 


55 






98 


63 


98 


33 


18 

13 


9 

39 


3 

4 


20 
7 


17 
15 


9 
2 


76 
80 


76 
80 


76 
80 


66 
80 


67 
80 


24 
20 






64 
80 


62 
60 


75 
80 


34 






35 


12 
29 


57 
42 


12 
16 


26 
17 


14 
1 


2 
15 


123 
103 


123 

116 


123 
116 


118 
103 


123 
117 


47 
57 






118 
100 


97 
51 


118 

103 


36 






37 


26 


16 


7 


7 






54 


57 


57 


54 


57 


14 






53 


41 


55 


38 


21 
58 

17 
45 


88 

62 

1 

101 


11 
20 
13 
14 


25 
bl 
26 
27 


14 

21 

5 

13 


'"4 

21 

2 


125 

215 

82 

119 


158 

219 

83 

198 


158 

219 

83 

198 


149 

196 
82 

188 


157 

211 

82 

198 


48 
102 
13 






149 

171 

69 

188 


107 
93 
68 

119 


126 

193 

82 

119 


39 






40 






41 






42 


19 
55 


48 
60 


22 

20 


34 

19 


11 

1 


16 
10 


130 
138 


140 
160 


140 
160 


135 
138 


140 
160 


55 
69 






127 
137 


85 
91 


130 
140 


43 






44 


20 


85 


10 


20 


15 


11 


144 


161 


161 


144 


120 


39 






144 


95 


105 


45 


•20 
41 
28 

1? 


31 
131 

80 
12 


25 


10 
21 
20 
20 


8 

7 

5 

33 


2 
20 
11 

2 


73 
211 
145 

84 


73 
245 
161 

85 


73 
245 
16 1 

85 


78 
211 
145 

80 


73 
245 

161 
85 


59 

102 

83 

50 






73 
211 
137 

84 


38 
143 

78 

78 


73 

211 
145 

84 


46 






47 






48 






49 


?S 


48 


10 


20 


3 


11 


1 


120 


120 


120 


120 


55 






104 


82 


120 

127 


50 


35 


44 


15 


19 


6 


15 


127 


134 


134 


77 


134 


57 






127 


77 


51 


10 

8 


100 
36 


4 

6 


13 
2 


20 
5 


3 
10 


146 

67 


150 

67 


150 
67 


149 

67 


149 
67 


72 
25 






149 

67 


150 
42 


150 

67 


52 






53 


35 
2 
19 
15 
8 


45 

14 

28 

5 

124 


11 
8 
6 

7 
4 


29 
11 
16 
41 
22 


12 
10 

4 
33 

6 


3 
5 
3 
4 
4 


92 

50 

76 

97 

168 


135 

50 

76 

105 

168 


135 
50 

76 
105 

168 


185 
24 

76 

99 

168 


135 

50 

76 

103 

168 


43 
10 
22 
23 

58 






121 
50 
58 
97 

168 


92 

40 
54 

81 
110 


92 

50 

76 

103 

168 


54 












56 






57 




168 



46 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools 



High Schools. 



1 Alexandria 

2 Almonte 

3 Arnprior 

4 Arthur 

5 Athens * . . 

6 Aurora 

7 Beamsville 

8 Belleville 

9 Bowmanville 

TO Bradford 

11 Brampton 

12 Brighton 

13 Caledonia 

14 Campbellford 

15 Carleton Place 

lti Cayuga 

17 Chesley 

18 Colborne 

19 Cornwall 

20 Deseronto 

21 Dundas 

22 Dunnville 

23 Dutton 

21 East Toronto 

25 Elora 

26 Essex 

27 Fergus .'... 

28 Forest 

29 Fort William 

30 Gananoque 

31 Georgetown 

32 Glencoe 

33 Gravenhurst 

34 Grimsby 

35 Hagersville 

36 Harriston 

37 Hawkesbury 

38 Iroquois 

39 Kemptville 

40 Kenora 

41 Kincardine 

42 Leamington 

43 Listowel 

44 Lucan 

45 Madoc 

46 Markham 

47 Meaford 

48 Midland 

49 Mitchell 

50 Mount Forest 

51 Newburgh 

52 Newcastle 

53 Newmarket 

54 Niagara , 

55 Niagara Falls South, 

56 North Bay 

5 7 Norwood 







>, 


























































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53 












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H 


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O 


147 


70 




139 




139 




129 


129 


31 


126 


86 


7 


68 


3 


102 


4 


101 


94 


58 


139 


61 


5 


38 




121 


5 


95 


95 


28 


140 


140 


7 


32 




46 




100 


100 


58 


202 


202 


10 


107 


7 


196 


5 


85 


90 


145 


109 


109 


/ 


45 


4 


75 




69 


69 


71 


56 


57 




12 




26 




40 


40 


36 


260 
142 


255 
140 


15 
13 


150 

88 


'"l6 


140 
110 






150 

79 


85 


2 


79 


120 


137 

165 


140 
122 


"*20 


75 
135 


16 


124 
156 






58 
112 


62 


6 


10 


52 


69 
128 


48 
128 


"*6 


32 
65 


8 


53 

110 








22 




79 


79 


76 


172 


164 


8 


68 


6 


98 


4 


94 


94 


91 


157 


120 


7 


76 


10 


92 


2 


105 


85 


80 


82 


82 


4 


38 




57 




61 


61 


29 


105 


105 


8 


71 


9 


100 


2 




58 


106 


71 


£3 




25 


4 


58 




36 


36 


35 


252 


252 


22 


175 


20 


182 


6 


112 


112 


294 


. 101 


100 


8 


63 


15 


56 


1 


72 


72 


30 


138 


88 




79 


6 


112 




95 


95 


87 


146 


85 


8 


47 


10 


92 




97 


97 


62 


205 


205 


37 


28 


1 


200 




110 


110 


179 


98 


98 


4 


86 


12 


90 


6 


84 


84 


92 


76 


53 


14 


40 


12 


• 76 




65 


42 


34 


115 


90 


18 


77 


18 


114 


7 


1 


61 


115 


135 


136 


12 


75 


23 


106 


5 


80 


80 


117 


127 


82 


12 


96 


34 


109 




85 


87 


52 


88 


86 


2 


78 


3 


78 




71 


41 


15 


128 


. Ill 


6 


96 


33 


71 




52 


52 


81 


148 


148 


4 


27 


4 


109 


1 


125 


125 


32 


108 


108 


11 


48 




94 




5 


58 


55 


76 


74 


1 


36 




31 




47 


47 


27 


79 


46 




32 




41 




28 


28 


41 


123 


111 


5 


68 


5 


84 


1 


97 


97 


118 


116 


116 


17 


40 


34 


98 




52 


52 


100 


57 


37 


6 


57 




47 




40 


42 


56 


158 


95 


11 


77 


7 


118 


5 


131 


131 


87 


216 


216 


23 


169 


5 


170 


5 


106 


106 


211 


83 


83 


1 


39 




42 




27 


27 


13 


148 


148 


10 


97 


16 


121 


3 


78 


76 


121 


140 


120 


4 


61 





62 


3 




60 


53 


161 


161 


22 


111 


49 


160 


14 


91 


91 


101 


161 


159 


17 


73 


6 


132 




100 


100 


69 


73 
245 


39 
245 


""34 


25 
156 


4 

25 


63 
235 






38 
153 


30 


7 


10 


98 


158 


158 


16 


92 


21 


156 




4 


4 


159 


86 


85 


5 


49 


4 


55 




40 


78 


84 


119 


86 




40 




61 




82 


82 


52 


134 


134 


7 


38 


3 


120 


1 


2 


79 


129 


149 


148 




49 




82 




92 


92 


62 


67 
128 


67 
115 




26 
82 


6 


38 
85 






20 
92 


18 




92 


130 


50 
76 
95 


33 
22 

72 


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23 
59 

78 


i 

32 
4 


35 
49 
73 






40 


26 


3 




15 


75 


75 


85 


160 


• 162 




76 


3 


130 






131 


129 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



47 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

and in the various subjects, etc. — Continued. 



subjects.— Continued. 





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31 
111 
136 
140 
197 
109 

57 
260 
129 
136 
165 

47 
129 

99 
125 

83 
106 

53 
301 
101 
143 
134 
205 

92 

76 
119 
135 
122 

88 
108 
148 

98 

55 

60 
120 
110 

158 
211 

82 

145 

110 

162 

150 

73 

224 

161 

85 

120 

129 

71 

40 

135 

26 

15 

86 

131 


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95 
67 
78 
89 
90 
69 
17 

164 
72 
91 
38 
26 
60 
60 
40 
44 
36 
36 

152 
72 
96 
90 
26 
86 
23 
25 
41 
59 
72 
58 

109 
53 
46 
53 
71 
35 
33 
89 
56 
68 
50 
40 
91 
61 
38 

143 
43 
55 
26 
77 
78 
43 
69 
40 
32 
60 

110 


95 
73 

78 
89 
90 
69 
17 

164 
72 
72 
96 
26 
60 

103 
82 
44 
36 
36 
92 
60 
95 
79 
57 
86 
23 
40 
41 
59 
70 
58 

109 
53 
46 
53 
71 
35 
33 
89 
56 
49 
83 
40 
43 
61 
38 

143 
76 
78 
54 
77 
70 
25 
75 
40 
52 
60 
75 








95 
91 
96 

100 
90 
69 
40 

164 
72 
91 

102 


147 










61 
35 


52 


2 


34 


19 


22 








3 








4 






140 








51 

85 
41 
22 


















6 
































8 
















9 


20 
48 
30 




120 












10 




16 










11 


30 






24 




12 












13 






79 










43 




14 


25 














16 




104 
50 
65 
36 

152 
72 
96 
82 
57 
86 










65 
20 
41 




16 
















17 






53 










18 














19 




59 

*37 

38 


59 


148 

72 

117 

142 


59 






70 
21 
1 
24 
84 

34 

28 
32 
47 
5 
25 
36 
44 
12 
11 
16 




20 








21 




39 


12 








22 








23 










24 
















55 
















26 


10 




60 


90 

80 




52 






27 








28 






59 
72 
28 

109 
53 
46 
55 
7J 
55 
38 

125 
93 
54 

105 
72 
91 
61 
38 










29 


70 
30 
18 




60 

140 


20 
30 








30 


30 
32 








31 








32 












33 


8 




76 


8 








34 










35 
















36 


26 


20 


51 










37 








13 

43 
191 

1 
69 
42 




38 


15 














39 














40 
















41 


51 


50 












42 












43 






141 

144 










44 


10 


30 








39 
35 




45 










46 


40 

12 


10 
12 

8 












47 


78 
40 
54 

77 
92 


145 
85 

120 
59 








67 
31 
39 
50 




48 










49 














50 














51 


70 












52 












15 
43 
10 

22 
22 




53 


48 
38 
33 
19 


45 
31 
33 

27 


90 

40 
54 
60 
79 


132 

""76 

62 


13 
3 








54, 








55 








56 


13 








57 









48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the 



High School; 



58 Oakville 

59 Omemee 

60 Orangeville 

61 Oshawa 

62 Paris 

63 Parkhill 

64 Pembroke 

65 Petrolea 

66 Picton 

67 Plantagenet 

68 Port Arthur 

69 Port Dover 

70 Port Elgin 

71 Port Hope 

72 Port Perry.. 

73 Port Rowan 

74 Prescott 

75 Richmond Hill.... 

76 Rockland 

77 Sault Ste. Marie ... 

78 Simcoe 

79 Smith's Falls 

80 Smithville 

81 Stirling 

82 Streetsville 

83 Sydenham 

84 Thorold 

85 Tillsonburg 

86 Toronto Technical 

87 Trenton 

88 Uxbridge 

89 Vienna 

90 Walkerton 

91 Wardsville 

92 Waterdown 

93 Waterford 

94 Wat ford 

95 Welland 

96 Weston 

97 Wiarton 

98 Williamstown 



1 Totals, High Schools , 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes. 



3 Grand totals, 1905 

4 Grand totals, 1904 



5 Increases . 

6 Decreases. 



7 Percentages. 



Pupils. 



59 
82 
8 
27 
33 
46 
95 
61 
38 
50 
57 
17 
59 
86 
til 
36 
29 
34 
41 
•22 
52 
401 
82 
78 
12 
70 
15 
5;} 
64 
70 
78 
46 
50 
54 



6,038 
6,997 



13,035 
12,718 



317 



45.48 



28 

116 
94 
68 
83 
65 

105 

118 
24 
55 
46 
40 

144 
59 
28 
74 
58 
27 
91 
91 

122 
35 
34 
29 
75 
50 
73 

578 
95 
91 
25 
84 
25 
66 
50 
93 

131 
45 
59 
59 

7,419 
8.207 



15,626 
14,991 



54.52 



121 

56 

201 

172 

137 

159 

155 

164 

200 

32 

82 

79 

86 

289 

120 

66 

124 

115 

44 

150 

177 

ISO 

71 

03 

63 

lie, 

72 

125 

982 

177 

169 

37 

151 

•10 

119 

111 

163 

209 

91 

109 

113 



28,001 
27,709 



952 



73 

35 
121 
101 

84 
103 
92 
103 
123 
'27 
49 
53 
01 
151 
os 

41 
73 
75 
38 
85 
103 
126 
43 
40 



58 

77 
470 
104 

107 
18 
97 
24 

72 
72 
91 
125 
55 
05 



8,218 
9,349 



17,56 
16,730 



S37 



61.29 



Number of pupils in 



86 

20 

96 

114 

106 

87 

103 

94 

108 

32 

67 

48 

45 

123 

78 

48 

89 

75 

42 

113 

109 

125 

41 

37 

34 

68 

44 

82 

*090 

124 

102 

17 

103 

24 

68 

60 

92 

120 

63 

54 

85 

8,341 
9,851 



18,192 
17,879 



313 



03.47 



42 
37 

48 
73 
20 
45 

28 

4,192 
4,059 



8,251 
7,855 



14 


1 


31 




35 


6 


87 


29 


35 


7 


18 




32 


3 


28 


12 


2 




37 




53 


15 


48 


13 


30 




21 


5 


24 


5 


48 




28 




43 




f237 


J55 


31 


22 


49 


18 


20 




34 


17 


16 





28.79 7.74 



Number of pupils from 



be . 

■s-s 



E 3 



04 
28 

90 

100 
■S3 
73 

134 
96 

112 
18 
82 
4 
56 

130 
55 
26 
87 

113 
'27 

112 
73 

131 
30 
24 
19 

110 
52 
59 

925 

117 



'3 5 




36 


1 




2 


12 


5 


38 




101 


3 


30 


22 


32 


J 


39 




33 


11 



* First year. 



| Second year. 



t Third year. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



49 



HIGH SCHOOL'S.— Continued. 

Schools and in the Various Subjects. — Continued. 



Occupation of Parents. 



Number of Pupils in the various subjects. 





od 

o 

CD 

3 
3 


cd 
a 


a 

o 

'55 

s 

O 


so 

_o 

Or 

o 

o 
O 

3 
xi 

a 


CO 

.2 
3 
p. 

a 
o 
O 

be 

o 

£> 

a 


GO 

a 

"3 
o 

S-r 

CD 


3 
3 

5 

"Si 


T3 

p 

03 

.2 

1 

a . 
3.2 

82 
^ v 

ex 


CD 

2 
O 


>> 

u 


SO 

3 

a 

ee 

5 


>> 

^. 



3 

09 


>> 

/: 

3 

.2 




C/3 

3 

| 

-3 




co 

s 

C 
CD 

O 


>> 
si 
a, 
ss 

§> 

CD 


-3 

CD 


a 

I 

S 

-a 
c 

S3 

<s 

3 


CD 

be 




o 


< 


Ch 


<% 


J 


O 


H 


w 


w 




5 


< 


a 


» 


O 


tf 


< 


< 


fts 


22 
4 


55 
30 


12 


17 
5 


10 

8 


5 
2 


120 
56 


120 
56 


120 

56 


120 
56 


120 
5b 


34 

36 






9! 
56 


96 
56 


120 
56 


82 


59 






56 


60 


50 


90 


21 


30 


2 


8 


183 


196 


199 


186 


199 


102 






14*^ 


130 


188 


198 


6! 


35 


58 


11 


50 


10 


c 


164 


172 


172j 158 


158 


58 




166 


130 


164 


169 


fi? 


28 
34 

47 


53 
88 

18 


13 
14 
15 


38 

8 

39 


4 

12 
26 


1 

3 
10 


112 
139 
147 


130 
159 
153 


1301 6C 


72 
159 
150 


22 

72 
51 






94 
139 
121 


84 

87 
103 


121 
139 
147 


114 


63 


159 
153 


139 
122 






144 


64 






155 


6R 


38 

54 

6 


43 

85 
19 


8 
13 


25 

22 

4 


38 

24 

3 


12 
2 


137 
194 

32 


164 
199 
32 


164 
199 
32 


137 
145 
32 


137 
136 

32 


70 
77 






10ft 
17( 

32 


10ft 
108 
32 


137 
193 
32 


lr>4 


fit", 






177 


67 




32 


32 


fifi 


40 
11 


ft 
36 


20 
4 


11 
10 


5 


1 
18 


78 
79 


78 
79 


78 
79 


78 
79 


7S 
79 


11 
31 






76 

48 


69 

48 


78 
79 


59 


fi9 






79 


70 


ft 


33 


2 


10 


19 


17 


86 


86 


86 


86 


86 


35 


....... 




79 


86 


86 


86 


71 


62 


102 


11 


18 


27 


19 


210 


239 


239 


210 


221 


116 






210 


123 


210 


186 


7:> 


29 


39 


9 


15 


13 


15 


113 


120 


120 


113 


120 


42 


7 




113 


120 


113 


108 


7-1 


17 
31 
30 
6 
45 
32 


30 
28 
57 
15 
12 
70 


1 
9 
4 
2 
17 
16 


6 

20 

7 

6 

47 

36 


4 
23 

8 
11 
20 
18 


8 
13 
9 
4 
9 
5 


48 
86 
112 
"44 
150 
162 


66 

124 
114 
44 
150 
175 


66 
121 
lift 

44 
150 
175 


66 
86 
47 
44 
147 
162 


66 
86 
58 
44 
150 
175 


33 
32 
48 
2 
37 
68 






62 
8ft 
77 
39 
150 
162 


48 
85 
75 
44 
128 
109 


48 
87 
101 
44 
150 
162 


64 


74 






124 


7S 






110 


7K 






44 


77 






150 


78 






165 


79 


49 
3 


52 
58 


10 


50 

5 


22 
3 


3 

2 


181 

71 


186 
71 


186 
71 


125 

71 


184 
3 


61 
30 






173 

71 


186 
41 


182 

71 


186 


SI) 






71 


SI 


7 


38 


5 


ft 


7 


1 


63 


63 


63 


58 


63 


21 






63 


37 


58 


63 


so 


8 

14 
10 
11 


36 
76 
25 
50 


6 

6 

1 

1ft 


5 
10 
15 
32 


6 

5 

20 

9 


2 
5 

1 
8 


58 
116 

72 
125 


63 
116 

72 
125 


63 

116 

72 

125 


58 

86 

72 

113 


58 
78 
72 
94 


29 

48 
20 
41 






60 
116 

72 
119 


55 

68 

72 

102 


58 
116 

72 
125 


63 


S3 






116 


fM 






68 


85 






125 


sr, 


294 
49 
36 


22 
57 

68 


49 

10 
1ft 


510 
27 
38 


56 
20 

7 


21 
4 
5 


666 

162 
151 


666 

169 
169 


601 
169 
169 


366 
161 
151 


366 

170 
163 


29 
45 

162 






275 
106 
147 


601 
144 
102 


701 
161 

151 


601 


S7 






159 


88 






167 


89 


4 
46 

2 


27 
42 
26 


o 
17 


4 
20 






37 
146 
39 


37 

154 
39 


37 
149 
39 


37 
137 
39 


37 
149 
39 


21 

46 
1ft 






36 
133 
39 


19 
137 
24 


36 
146 
39 


36 


90 


14 

1 


15 
1 






150 


91 






39 


<>? 


13 


51 


12 


23 


16 


4 


119 


119 


119 


110 


119 


51 






110 


119 


110 


119 


93 


21 


73 


7 


4 


2 




104 


108 


108 


104 


108 


49 




108 


100 


108 


108 


104 


<M 


34 

80 
17 


89 
57 
34 


8 

28 
12 


28 

41 

9 


4 

2 

10 


'"i 

9 


140 

180 

91 


154 

205 

91 


154 

205 

91 


150 
99 
60 


154 

204 
86 


101 

48 
27 






140 
123 

77 


92 

120 

63 


140 

193 
89 


154 


Q=> 






205 


96 




91 


91 


97 


20 

5 


30 

67 


10 
8 


37 
12 


12 

8 


'"i3 


109 
113 


109 
113 


109 
113 


99 

100 


109 
41 


55 

28 






99 
111 

11.057 


54 

72 

9.222 


99 

112 

11,955 


109 


MS 






112 




66 


554 




1 


2,895 


4,961 


1.107 


2,665 


1,180 


649 


11.971 


12.711 


12.945 


11.079 


11.898 


4.724 


10,534 


2 


4,596 


3.425 


1,573 


3,638 


971 


1,001 


13,428 


14.956 


14,830 


11,487 


12,077 


4,811 




326 
880 


10,946 
22.003 


10,702 
19.924 


13.500 
25.455 


13,313 


3 


7,491 


8,386 


2,680 


6.303 


2,151 


1.650 


25.399 


27.6671 


27.775 


22,566 


23,975 


9.535 


66 


23.847 


4 


7,645 


8,516 


2,604 


7,099 




1,845 


25.019 


27,298 


27,070 


19,014 


21.520 


9,142 
393 


74 


1.993 


18,493 
3,510 


19,632 

292 


25.249 
206 


25.143 
















380 


369 


705 


3,552 


2,455 




fi 














8 


1.113 


1,296 


































7 


26.14 


29.20 


9.36 


21.99 


7.55 


5.76 


88.62 


96.53 


96.98 


78.73 


83.61 


33.27 


.23 


3.74 


76.84 


69.51 


88.81 


83.2 



4 E. 



50 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IT. — Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the 





Number of pupils in 


High Schools. 


s 

o 
O 


2 
o 
c 
o 
bo 


A 
o 
C 
o 


G 

S3 

£ 
o 

O 


S3 

h3 




to 


'o 



C 

S3 
O 


(1 

B 

A 
O 


58 Oakville 


82 

56 

192 

91 

74 

144 

155 

164 

118 

32 

5b 

79 

86 

182 

104 

60 

62 

78 

44 

150 

127 

186 

49 

63 

47 

116 

60 

125 

601 

124 

108 

36 

93 

29 

119 

83 

154 

142 

54 

109 

75 


2 
24 
13 

9 
20 

8 
18 

9 
.... 

"*6 

29 
6 

i 

6 

'"l5 
13 

5 
5 

60 

16 

16 

1 

14 

"*9 

5 

13 

15 

1 

6 


28 
20 

164 

106 
40 
72 
81 
57 

125 
32 
61 
21 
40 

137 
59 
30 
41 
77 
44 
82 
50 

143 
12 
21 
46 
94 
58 
81 

490 
81 

107 

6 

30 

3 

100 
48 
61 

114 
49 
12 
75 


3 

27 

40 

12 
8 

12 
4 

22 

7 

3 

14 

15 

9 

"4 

5 

'"26 
13 
2 

5 
7 


78 

36 

152 

123 

66 

101 

115 

184 

140 

14 

55 

67 

78 

156 

71 

41 

57 

74 

28 

130 

90 

151 

61 

62 

60 

101 

48 

82 




69 


69 

26 

70 

129 

85 

74 

103 

100 

117 

32 

45 

48 

86 

45 

60 

46 

43 

70 


103 




36 




8 
4 
4 
4 

i 


70 

'"85 
74 
61 
103 
95 


135 




45 


62 Paris , 


38 


63 Parkhill 


66 




51 




124 


66 Picton 


159 




82 


68 Port Arthur 


1 
1 
1 

3 
6 

.... 


45 

48 
86 
45 

"•46 
43 

68 


58 


69 Port Dover : 


58 


70 Port Elgin. . 


35 




84 


72 Port Perry ... 


65 


73 Port Rowan 


38 
31 


75 Richmond Hill 


31 


76 Rockland 






"'3 
3 

.2 


128 
109 
125 
41 
42 
53 
95 
50 
107 


128 

109 

125 

41 

42 

55 

68 

50 

107 


143 




65 


79 Smith's Falls 


112 


80 Smithville 


71 


81 Stirling 


51 


82 Streetsviile 


58 




32 


84 Thorol d 


28 




43 


86 Toronto Technical 


251 


87 Trenton 


30 
16 

'"53 

"io 

15 
10 
24 
13 
4 

I 


134 
92 
25 

127 
22 

112 
97 

151 

162 
70 

100 
90 


'"2 
"i 

'"4 

2 

"4 


53 

102 

24 

65 

34 

110 

68 

90 

120 

54 

54 

72 


35 

102 
24 
47 
34 
68 
68 
92 

120 
54 
54 
72 


111 


88 Uxbridge.. . 


150 




35 


90 Walkerton 


40 


91 Wardsville 


29 




42 


93 Waterford 




94 Watford 


155 




80 


96 Weston 


24 




71 


98 Williamstown 


112 






1 Totals, High Schools 


10,964 
11,155 


806 

1,107 


6,932 
9,498 


885 
2,481 


9,033 
10,376 


158 
445 


5.857 
4,616 


7,029 
6,540 


7.403 




5,010 






3 Grand totals, 1 905 


22.123 
20,519 


1,913 
1,759 


16,430 
16,039 


3,366 
3,274 


19,409 
19,409 


603 
637 


10,473 
4,764 


IX, 569 
11,463 


12,413 


4 " •• 1904 


9,038 








1,601 


154 


391 


92 






5,709 


2,106 


3 375 






34 






77.18 


















6.6 


57.3 


11.7 


67.71 


2.1 


36.54 


47.34 


13.3 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



51 



HIGH SCHOOLS.— Continued. 

Schools and in the various subjects. — Concluded. 





A 
Ph 


be 
o 

1 


be 

a 

•n 


be 
P 

"E. 

<u 
0) 

M 




PQ 


>> 

A 

O. 

S3 

be 

a 

CO 


bib 

C 

a 

a. 


>- 

< 


C 
O 

"5 
5 

w 

"3 



A 


Special Courses. 




"3 
"3 

0) 

S 

I 


be 
c 

c 

'3 
H 
o3 

a 

as 


6 

c 
* 

CO 
Kt 

"o 

A 
yj 

O 


A 
"5) 

W 
•0 

a 

aJ . 

.2 3 

Ss 

S£ 

■go 

< 


< 


58 


103 

56 

199 

156 

106 

72 

53 

164 

176 

32 

58 

75 

86 

95 

70 

66 

79 

115 

8 

150 

175 

1X6 

71 

63 

58 

116 

72 

•125 

251 

124 

167 

37 

114 

38 

119 

113 

163 

54 

78 

112 




41 
20 
85 
89 
72 
87 

101 
54 
95 
32 
58 
18 
45 

123 
95 
33 
52 
75 
39 
9K 

109 

140 


84 
12 
85 

103 
72 
74 

101 
54 
54 
32 
60 
16 
45 
85 
95 
45 
62 
75 
39 
98 
60 

140 
22 
37 
31 
38 
40 
68 

494 
89 
59 
IX 
83 
24 
68 
60 
52 

54 
54 

72 


42 


40 


84 

12 
87 
86 
84 
87 
101 
85 
58 
32 
60 
16 
45 
65 




38 






27 




59 








60 














88 




61 


50 
57 
52 


58 
38 
74 




23 
22 
32 








62 






15 
52 
18 
52 




63 








64 








65 


51 
18 


10 
25 


59 










66 
67 


25 








(W 


25 


26 
16 




22 










69 






31 

25 
43 




70 


86 

"iio 










71 


63 

24 

'"45 

"*65 
20 

23 


76 


63 
6 








77 








73 


'"l8 
19 

"*34 


48 

52 

75 

39 

102 

109 

140 

41 

37 

34 

38 

25 

101 

313 

82 

102 

20 

49 

24 

68 

68 

92 

120 

54 

54 

72 






18 

32 




74 




7 
5 








75 








76 










77 










22 

35 
48 
30 
21 
24 




78 


109 










79 










80 












81 




37 
16 
38 
40 
68 

494 
89 
59 
18 

133 
24 
68 
60 
52 

54 
54 

72 












82 
















83 
















84 


45 


45 










10 

50 

"is 

49 




85 












86 

87 


494 
33 


494 
8 


" 169 
12 


494 

11 




358 


313 


88 








89 


1 
29 


"24 










90 








18 
14 
42 
37 
42 
23 
12 
36 
28 




91 












92 
















93 
















94 




25 


75 










95 








96 


1 


3 












97 












98 

































! 


11,063 
10,838 


81 
8 


6,631 

7,843 


6,676 
6,476 


1,930 
2,627 


1.508 
1,837 

3,345 
3,178 


6,899 
6,742 

13,641 
11,596 


3,020 
11,685 


944 
1,984 


52 
1,234 


358 
1,192 


2,644 
2,214 


365 
124 


i 


21,901 
17,837 


89 
186 


14,474 
13,156 


13,152 
14,334 


4.557 
4,804 


14,705 
4,629 


2,928 
3,006 


1,2»6 
1,300 


1,550 
1,117 


4,85° 
5,117 


489- 
425 


5 


4,064 


"97 


1,318 






167 


2,045 


10,076 






433 


' ' - 25y 


64 


6 


1,182 


247 


78 


14 














7 


76.41 


.31 


50.5 


45.88 


15.89 


11.67 


47.59 


51.3 


9.16 


4.48 


5.4 


16.94 


1.76 



52 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. — Table K. — Miscellaneous 











Equip- 


• 


O 

X5 


T3 

a 

o 


-d 






GO 


o 

3 


be 

a 


be 
C 

T2 


Collegiate Institutes. 


O 
A 
8 

a 
t 


be 
c? 

e 

an 


03 

o 
« 

'3 


>. 


a; 


g 

«3 

P. 
P. 
< 
o 


5 
a, 

on 


o3 

u 
Q 
U 
O 

on 


o 

a, 

B 

"So 




u 
o 

a 
o 


03 
O 


0) 

3 


3 


p. 

H 


Pi 
'3 

CO 


03 


o 






GO 


<0 


GO 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 3 




M 


r=> 




Hi 




0> 


a> 


€> 


a> a* 




q 


o 


3 






3 




a> 










aJ 


35 


3j 


3 


a3 


3j 




M 


£ 


CO 


> 


>■ 


> 


!> 


> 


> 










8 


$ 


8 


S 


% 


$ 


1 Avlmer 


B 
B 
B 
B 

S 
B 
B 
B 


4 
3 
4 

ft 




664 
620 
712 
641 
823 
786 
697 
641 


""iso 

835 
215 
112 
500 
125 
480 


673 

744 

1,384 

885 

1,145 

1,541 

847 

843 


140 
136 
115 
108 
191 
201 
128 
146 


33 
5 

20 
27 
10 
12 
5 
8 


680 


2 Barrie 


1.730 


3 Berlin 


1,000 


4 Brantford 


1,000 


5 Brockville 




6 Chatham 


600 


7 Clinton 


765 


8 Cobourg 


* 


9 Collingwood.. *. 


B 




1 


669 


150 


647 


96 


8 


1,200 


10 Gait 


S 
B 

S 


"T 


1,112 

673 

1,010 


367 
265 
285 


1,227 
586 
892 


67 

71 

164 


9 
20 
12 


1,200 


11 Goderich 


2,500 


12 Guelph 


2,500 


13 Hamilton 


B&S 
B 
B 
B 


3 

2 
2 
2 


1 
1 

1 
1 


1,016 
695 
733 

1,420 


90 
180 
600 
250 


1,546 
759 
689 

1,137 


209 

121 

75 

154 


25 

4 

25 

10 


* 


14 Ingei soil 


811 


15 Kingston 




16 Lindsay 


600 


17 London 


B 
B 


3 

1 


1 

1 


972 
689 


560 
207 


3,046 
1,265 


173 
167 


43 

17 


* 


18 Morrisburg 


980 


19 Napanee 


B 
B 


3K 
5% 


1 


944 

783 


245 

315 


931 
622 


126 

88 


18 
25 


800 


20 Niagara Falls 


1,063 


21 Orillia 


B 

S 


2 

1 




642 

1,288 


270 

871 


530 
1,800 


110 
292 


68 
150 


1,800 


22 Ottawa 






B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 


3 
4 

IK 

ri 

2 K 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1,399 
791 
649 
589 
693 
631 
735 
929 


225 

"'265 

150 
180 
270 
140 
660 


1,850 
833 

1.026 
619 

1,130 
815 
699 

1,125 


129 
155 
159 
70 
143 
135 
120 
110 


20 
10 

• 25 
12 

48 
18 
25 
18 




24 Perth 


560 


25 Peterborough 




26 kenfrew 




27 Ridgetown 


900 


28 St. Catharines 


900 


29 St. Mary's , 


700 


30 St. Thomas - 


1,323 


31 Sarnia 


B 
B 
B 


23| 
2g 

8 


1 


811 

794 

1,041 


315 

180 
450 


758 

804 

1,211 


127 

138 
220 


12 

2 

26 


1,380 


32 Seaforth 


600 


33 Stratford 




34 Strathroy 


B 


1 




958 


180 


885 


116 


28 


380 


35 Toronto (Harbord) 


B 


1 


1,315 
1,683 




2,267 


175 


28 


4,000 


36 Toronto (Jameson) 


B 


1 




2.293 


155 


15 


4,000 




B 


1 


1,252 
943 
623 
631 
9S4 

1,046 




1,529 


181 


35 


8,000 


38 Toronto Junction 


B 
B 
B 
B 
B 


i' 

1 

20 


270 

180 

' ' '881 

480 


888 
768 
550 
990 
1,523 


107 
46 
115 
130 
51 


32 
3 
10 
35 
15 




39 Vankleek Hill 


3,000 


40 Whitby 


850 


41 Windsor 


3,000 


42 Woodstock 


1,000 






Totals 






36,727 


11,928 


46,302 


5,660 


971 


49 822 











* Gymnasium is part of main building. 



1!>06 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



53 



HIGH SCHOOLS.- -Contn, ued. 
Information. 



ment. 






Religious 


and other Exercises 






Destination of Pupils. 




























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700 

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99 
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15 

18 
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14 

42 
24 
12 


8 
9 
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19 






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21 


250 
236 








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23 


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267 
















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1 

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1 
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5 

20 

18 
13 

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6 
4 
6 

15 


5 
1 

10 
5 
4 
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9 
16 
14 
11 
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8 

10 
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24 


500 


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25 






43 


26 




1 
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14 


27 


90 

70 


10 

75 






23 


28 






23 


29 


84 
374 
248 

66 
117 
104 
700 
790 














1 


13 
78 

26 
8 
20 
10 
26 
25 


12 
27 
5 
3 
3 
15 

""2 


1 

8 
2 
2 
3 
8 
1 
9 


19 
9 
17 
16 
9 
8 
3 
4 


7 
5 
4 
12 
4 
5 
9 


10 


30 






23 


31 










1 


28 


32 


"'500 


1 
.... 






21 


33 








1 
1 
1 

1 


45 


34 






15 


35 






86 


36 




1 






1 


80 


37 


200 


570 










1 




1 


40 


1 


12 


4 


35 


71 


38 






1 












1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


18 
8 
4 

29 
f30 


6 
3 
4 

5 
V 


9 
3 

8 
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12 
18 

5 

til 


8 

3 

6 
to 


19 


39 


236 
209 
200 

180 








9 


40 








1 


12 


41 


300 

80 




50 


42 










|36 








8,800 


3,970 


19 


41 


1 


13 


31 


1,026 


370| 


246 


608 


274 


1,605 



t Estimated. 



54 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. —Table K. —Miscellaneous 















Equipment. 








o5 

CO 

P 
o 

w 


n 










CD 




*• 
c 

p 


High Schools . 


o 
o 

o 
CO 


p 
p 
8 

oj 


V, 

a3 
O 

pq 






p 
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u 


O 
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P 
03 


60 

P 

08 

Fh 




p 



p 




a 


P, 


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2 


a, 


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P 


S 




03 


p 











3 


O 


p 




Eh 
o 


o 

o3 


5 

n3 


>> 
£ 




en 
p 


03 

rP 


CO 

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P 

t>.p 




o 


O 


p 


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H 


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O 


S 


2 




















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f 






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O 


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p 




P 


























p 




03 




03 


oi 


03 


as 4) 




M 


£ 


CO 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 


> 










$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


s 


1 Alexandria 


B 

S 
B 


n 

i 
i 


i 

1 


383 
920 
308 


"'135 


453 
480 
367 


85 
78 
89 


23 
12 
16 




2 Almonte 




3 Arnprior 




4 Arthur 


B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 


3 

1 

f 

5 

5 

2 
-y 


"i 

i 

.... 

i 
i 


328 
516 
419 
326 
304 
610 
333 
479 
298 
482 
371 


95 

"'35 
65 


675 
477 
459 
287 
569 
537 
339 
639 
319 
494 
503 


38 
69 
69 
70 

174 
60 

100 
66 
42 
33 
29 


31 
10 

8 

6 
21 

8 
42 
34 
10 

4 




5 Athens 




6 Aurora 




7 Beamsville 




8 Belleville 




9 Bowmanville 




10 Bradford 




11 Brampton 




12 Brighton 




13 Caledonia 




14 Campbellford 




15 Carleton Place 


S 
B 


1 
1 


i 


721 
218 




352 

368 


65 
k4 


8 




16 Cayuga 




17 Chesley 


B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B' 


5 

4 

4 


" i 
"i 


301 
268 
518 
346 
482 
390 
213 
289 
233 
373 


" - 3i5 
'"95 

'"45 


311 
381 
425 
395 
548 
573 
525 
279 
358 
492 


46 

117 

126 

87 

109 

65 

31 

30 

43 

70 






1* Colborne 


5 
13 

4 
20 
23 

6 
2 

28 




19 Cornwall 




20 Deseronto 


300 






22 Dunnville 




23 Dutton ' 




24 East Toronto 




25 Elora 


% 






26 Essex 


500 


27 Fergus 


S 


1 


l 


303 




271 


76 


9 




28 Forest 


B 
B 
B 
B 


2 

472 


"i 


317 
169 
598 
257 


"i45 

65 


443 
216 

579 
464 


94 

57 

114 

76 


22 
3 
19 
10 




29 Fort William 




30 Gananoque 




31 Georgetown 




32 Glencoe 


B 
B 
B 
B 


2 

V/t. 


'"i 


408 
265 
210 
341 




547 
387 
287 
545 


55 
58 
29 
54 


28 

5 

10 

28 




33 Gravenhurst 




34 Grimsby , 




35 Hagersville 




36 Harriston 


B 
B 
B 


3 

% 


"i 


66 

141 
641 


37 
'"56 


343 

234 

1,214 


22 

25 

142 












38 Iroquois 


18 




39 Kemptville 


B 
B 
B 
B 


2 
1 
4 
1>4 


i 
i 
i 


309 
217 

583 
266 


'"526 


424 
453 

744 
419 


68 
53 
82 
92 












41 Kincardine 


34 
32 




42 Leamington 




43 Listowel • 


B 
B 
B 
B 


2 
3 

1 




333 

260 
165 

280 


'"96 


518 
613 
515 
850 


55 

73 
90 
55 


is 


250 










46 Markham . . 


38 




47 Meaford 


B 
B 


r> 




357 

285 


270 
95 


462 
716 


81 
25 


/ 


1,250 


48 Midland 






B 
B 


4 




234 

448 




429 
599 


64 
43 


21 


566 


50 Mount Forest 






S 


4 


i 


477 




338 


85 






&2 Newcastle 


B 


i 


219 




326 


52 


4 






B 
B 




227 
134 


213 
100 


583 
166 


74 
70 


23 

16 


350 


54 Niagara 




55 Niagara Falls South 


B 


2 




286 


95 


357 


41 


3 






R 


2 




20 


360 


32.', 








57 Norwood 


B 


8 


i 


362 




341 


21 


2 





1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



55 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued. 
Information. — Continued. 



Equipment. — Con . 


Religious and other Exercises. 


Destination of Pupils. 


'53 

9t 
fl 

a 

o 

o 

9 

a 

"B 

W 

o 
<u 



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> 


c5 

a 

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r o 
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£ 
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o 
o 

a> 

a 

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CD 

A . 
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IS 

£§ 
A'Z, 

S3? 


Number who entered the professions 
Law, Medicine and the Church. 


o> 
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as 
a> 

CD 

a 

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o 

cd 
A 

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CD 

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8 

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8 










1 
1 


2 

15 

6 

8 

2 

13 

8 

18 

11 

5 

6 

4 

3 

12 

11 

6 

2 

3 

33 

8 

17 

20 

11 

10 

2 

4 

7 

3 

11 

9 

6 

5 

4 

6 

5 

12 

1 

15 

4 
24 
6 
5 
1 
3 
18 
6 
1 
8 
3 

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5 
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5 


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1 
1 

11 
5 

10 
6 
3 

13 

10 

12 
4 

12 
6 
3 
4 
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7 
2 
8 
7 

12 

3 

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3 

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1 
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2 

3 

3 

18 

i 

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4 

5 

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6 
5 

14 
3 

37 
8 
6 

12 
8 
6 

11 
2 

11 

10 
9 
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19 
6 
9 
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15 

11 

5 


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9 

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26 


3 38 






20 


4 13 










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5 4 




1 


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6 




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7 






6 
43 

12 
5 
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13 

8 

16 

21 


8 








1 
1 

1 


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l 
i 
l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
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9 2 
10 43 


2 


1 


11 10 






12 




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14 


50 


1 






15 






16 










9 


17 

18 


5 


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i 




1 


3 

7 


19 








16 


20 210 


50 
50 






i 
l 


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21 39 










19 


22 






1 

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3 
3 
2 
4 


27 


23 










l 


5 

13 

9 


24 










25 




i 
i 




1 


.... 

l 
l 

l 
l 
l 

l 


26 220 


50 


14 

6 

21 

7 


27 






28 










29 










30 




i 
i 






4 
4 
4 


4 
3 


7 
4 
2 
2 
2 
4 
8 
1 
4 

20 
1 

12 
8 

17 
6 
8 

10 

17 
2 
1 

14 
9 
3 
8 
2 
1 
2 

15 


1 

i 

2 

6 

"4 

'"5 

3 

1 
4 
2 
7 
1 
2 
6 
3 
4 

"*3 

.... 

1 


13 

19 

11 

9 


31 5 
32 






1 


33 


500 


l 
i 






34 






l 


4 
11 

5 

2 
11 
15 

1 
10 

8 

"*3 

1 
18 
7 
3 
5 
1 
2 
7 
4 
2 
4 

*"io 


6 

5 

"i 

12 
1 
5 

"*2 

2 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

" i 

3 

2 


5 
5 


35 




i 


1 
1 


36 




i 


7 


37 




9 

12 

6 

9 

2 

10 

16 

4 

3 

12 

21 

12 

36 

12 

8 

8 

37 

11 


38 


275 


i 






i 

i 


39 18 






40 










41 


27 




1 


1 


i 
l 
l 
l 

.... 

i 
l 
l 


42 15 


l 


1 


43 42 






44 










45 




i 

l 




1 
1 

1 


46 13 

47 239 




48 




l 

l 


49 233 








50 10 

51 




1 


52 




l 






l 
i 
l 


53 97 






1 


54 


10 




55 30 






17 


56 




i 




1 
1 


i 


57 




2 



56 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III.— Table K.— Miscellaneous 



r 


CD 

co 

§ 

K 

o 

o 

o 
co 

© 

a 

aS 

Si 

u 
O 
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o 

CO 

M 


o 
be 

c? 
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a 

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s 

a3 

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S 

& 

& 
P 


T3 
u 
os 
o 
pq 

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o 

5 

CD 

a 
p 

O 
O 

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CO 


Equip- 


High Schools. 


£1 

O 
CD 

IS 
> 


co 

CO 

% 

CD 

P. 

H 
o 

CD 

13 
> 


GO 

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u 

aS 

a. 
P. 



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CO 



CD 

> 


K 

a> 
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CO 

p. 

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> 


a 
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c 
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s 

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£ c 
>»« 
08 

cd a 1 

r- CD 

3 


58 Oakville 


B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 
B&S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 
B&S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 
S& B 


f 

4 
3 

% 

3 
1 
3 

¥ 


1 

1 

..... 

1 
1 
1 

i' 

i 

"i" 

l 
i 

l 


271 


150 


252 
141 
590 
437 
559 
514 
509 
622 
684 
56 
434 
437 
404 
600 
457 
198 
370 
316 


59 

4 

57 

113 

108 

100 

94 

44 

118 

17 

102 

23 

48 

96 

44 

44 

112 

54 


3 


$ 


59 Omemee 




60 Orangeville 


664 
280 
363 
316 
278 
407 
665 
100 
370 
400 
241 
583 
288 
110 
285 
189 


' ' '266 
142 
140 

'"90 
450 

" " 180 

100 

' ' '356 

'"i20 


26 

14 

9 

3 

15 

5 

45 




61 Oshawa 




62 Paris 




62 Parkhill 




64 Pembroke 




65 Petrolea 




66 Picton 




67 Plantagenet 




68 Port Arthur 






69 Port Dover 


20 

30 

8 

8 

6 

18 

35 




70 Port Elgin 


300 


71 Port Hope 




72 Port Perrv 


200 


73 Port Rowan 




74 Prescott 




75 Richmond Hill 


3 


76 Rockland 




77 Sault Ste. Marie 






263 
354 
554 
130 
195 
242 
370 
261 
281 
380 
571 
349 
475 
336 
227 
234 
374 
345 
238 
280 
326 
277 


'"iio 

*"i80 

i',040 
155 

'"180 

'"166 
'"56 


306 
689 
495 
297 
291 
254 
337 
424 
503 
7,262 
400 
334 
243 
537 
199 
320 
410 
405 
598 
443 
302 
355 


35 

140 
67 
40 
42 
71 
37 
69 
84 
25 
76 
84 

121 
54 
28 
58 
64 

110 
32 

105 
53 
87 


18 

29 

5 




78 Simcoe 


5 

h 

3 
2 
1 

3 


i 

i' 

i' 

l 
i 

l 

"T 

i 




79 Smith's Falls 




80 Smith ville 




81 Stirling 






82 Streetsville 


2 




83 Sydenham 




84 Thorold , 


3 

2 

458 

7 

4 

10 

3 

33 

15 




85 Tillsonburg 




86 Toronto Technical 




87 Trenton 




88 Uxbridge 




89 Vienna 




90 Walkerton 




91 Wardsville 




92 Waterdown 




93 Waterford 




94 Watford 


47 




95 Welland 




96 Weston 


15 




97 Wiarton 




98 Williamstown 


10 








1 Totals, High Schools 






41 
20 


32,479 

26,727 


5,562 
11,928 


49,297 
46,302 


6,460 
5,660 


1,590 
971 


3,719 


2 Totals, Collegiate institutes 






49,822 










3 Grand totals, 1905 






61 

61 


59.206 
67,283 


17,490 
16,388 


95,599 
90,611 


12,120 
12,395 


2,561 
2,522 


53,541 


4 Grand totals, 1904 , 






53,498 








5 Increases 










1,102 


4,988 


'"275 


39 


43 


6 Decreases 








8,077 




















7 Percentages 






43.57 

































1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



57 



HIGH SCHOOLS. -Concluded. 
Information. — Concluded. 



ment. 


Religious and other Exercises. 


Destination of Pupils. 


| 
S 
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2 
3 
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1 


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1 








68 








1 

1 

.... 

1 
1 
1 

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5 
9 
7 

22 

17 
2 
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3 
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15 
9 
2 

10 
2 
2 
4 
9 
199 

10 
6 
2 

12 
3 
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8 

is 

4 

4 






2 
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1 


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l 
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72 

73 8 

74 29 

75 597 


10 






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17 




i 




1 


8 
2 


77 












1 
1 
1 


"l3 
18 
3 
2 
2 
2 
10 
1 


2 
5 

.... 


13 
14 
13 
7 
3 
3 
16 
4 
4 


3 

3 
4 

. i . . . . 
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24 


78 




i 




1 


10 


70 




20 


80 






1 


1 

1 


2 


81 


1... 




82 

83 

84 


25 ' 1 
25 


. 6 


1 


1 

1 


"i 


12 
4 


85 11 

86 

87 


150 

50 > 


8 






i 


233 




l 
i 
i 
i 






7 
5 


2 


6 
6 
2 

7 


11 

1 


17 


88 

89 


10 


1 




i 
i 
i 


23 


90 7 








"3 

10 
11 
16 
5 
2 
4 
12 


4 


1 


19 


92 








4 


02 










i 
.... 

i 

i 
i 


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2 

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1 


8 
15 
15 
5 
4 
12 
12 


3 

1 

2 


6 


93 




i 




1 


3 


94 






95 ... 








1 
1 


21 


96 






7 


97 






3 


98 


























2,039 
8,800 


1,489 
3,970 


36 
19 


94 
41 


G 
1 


30 
13 


66 
31 


923 
1,026 


489 
370 


158 
246 


697 
608 


183 

274 


1.295 
1,605 


10,839 
11,356 


5,459 

3,687 


55 
61 


135 
133 


38 


43 

41 


97 
95 


1,949 
1,834 


859 
811 


404 
331 


1,305 
1,240 


457 
408 


2,900 
2,406 


""5i7 


1,772 


6 


2 


"*3i 


2 


2 


115 


48 


73 


65 


49 


494 
























39.3 


96.4 


5 


3.1 


69.3 


24.7 


10.9 


5.1 


16.6 


5.8 


36.8 









58 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table L. — Protestant Separate Schools. 





| o5 


No. 6 
North 
Planta- 
genet. 


No. 1 
North 
Tilbury. 


f 6 

o> 

1 

$ c. 

448 14 

18 00 

"8*28 


o 

= 53 • 

o>.2 £ 

fl 3 O 

l 

$ c. 

14 19 

113 88 

2,425 00 

6 50 


to 

13 

o 
H 


Number of Schools 

Receipts : 
Balances from 1904 


1 

$ c. 
6 22 
2 00 

65 84 


1 

$ c. 
209 80 

2 80 
200 00 
117 10 


1 
* c, 

53 79 

17 99 

698 95 

120 00 


5 
$ c. 
732 14 


Government grants 


154 67 


Municipal grants & assessments 
Other sources 


3,389 79 
251 88 








Totals 


74 06 
58 50 


529 70 

225 00 
42 00 


890 73 

306 00 
134 13 


474 42 


2,559 57 


4,528 48 


Expenditure : 

Teachers' salaries 


318 75 


1,660 67 
270 35 


2,568 92 
446 48 


School sites and buildings .... 


Libraries, maps, apparatus, etc 
Other expenses 






2 81 


215 73 


168 28 


114 85 


509 95 


1,011 62 






Totals 


61 31 


482 73 


608 41 


433 60 


2,440 97 


4,027 02 






Balances on hand 


12 75 


46 97 


282 32 


40 82 


118 60 


501 46 






Teachers : 
Male 








1 

iii " 

$375 00 


1 

3 

II ; 2 II ; 

1 III. 

Male 

$650 00 
Female 

$358 00 


2 


Female 


1 

Temp. 

$156 00 


1 
III 

$275 00 


1 
III 

$306 00 


6 


Certificates 


11; 2 II; 4 III; 


Salaries v 


1 Temp. 
Av. male 


Pupils : 

Total number attending 

Boys 


$512 00 
Av. female 

$302 00 


15 

8 
7 
4 
7 
2 
2 
4 


14 

8 

6 

3 

7 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

5 

4 

4 

4 

14 

14 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 


30 

17 

13 

19 

7 

5 

4 

10 

4 


29 

19 

10 

16 

6 

5 

2 

5 

11 


232 
133 
99 
150 
69 
30 
42 
30 
61 


320 

185 


Girls 


135 


Average attendance 


192 


No. in 1st Readei", Part I . . . . 

1st " Part 11... 

" 2nd " 


96 
43 
52 


3rd " 


51 


4th " 


77 


" 5th or High S. Reader 

No. in Art 

" Geographv 


"*8 

8 


1 


30 
23 


29 
18 


90 
232 
232 
232 
232 
90 
90 
108 
140 
232 
232 


320 

295 


" Music 


246 


Literature 


8 
8 
4 


23 
30 
14 
4 
14 
30 
30 
30 


18 
23 
16 
4 
17 
17 
29 


295 


" Composition 


307 


' ' Grammar 


129 


" English History 


102 


Canadian History 

Physiology & Hygiene. 

" Nature Study 

Physical Culture 


4 
4 
8 
6 


147 
195 
313 

282 
1 


" Algebra .. 










1 


" Geometry 










1 


' ' Latin 










1 












1 












1 










69 


73 














Log 


Frame 


Brick 


Brick 


Brick 


3 B. ; 1 F. ; 1 L. 


Number of maps 


5 


9 


5 


21 


15 


55 ' 






Number of globes 






1 


2 




3 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



59 



Table M. — Report on Truancy. 



Cities. 



Brantford 

Chatham 

Guelph 

Hamilton 
Niagara Falls . 
Peterborough.. 
St. Catharines. 
St. Thomas. . . 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Windsor. 
Woodstock . . . 



Towns. 

Almonte 

Arnprior 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Bowmanville . 

Brockville 

Carleton Place 

Cobourg 

Cornwall 

Dundas 

Dunnville .... 

Durham 

Forest 

Gait 

Hespeler 

Huntsville 

Ingersoll 

Lindsay 

Listowel 

Milton 

Mitchell 

Newmarket 

! Perth 

j Petrolea 

Port Arthur . . 



s 

ocj C 

'£f 
II 

o w 

c u 
V c 

2 "a 



117 



2o 



O aj 

*> E 

o *-• 

. o 
o +> 



19 
33 
13 

130 
26 
50 

169 
94 
34 

640 

295 
3 



18 



c — 

5 h 

P °* 

H bo 

^ o 



co OS 

ft Oh 



oO 



15 
24 
16 
415 
62 
31 
47 
57 
26 
90 
5 
65 



CP~ 

p CO 

CP 

02 -4-s 



c3 ai 
V CP 

CM w 
6 Oh 



c 



54-1 CD 

O >( 

c' 
c « 

!Z3 



26 



Towns. — Con. 



Port Hope . . 
Prescott .... 

Preston 

St. Mary's. . 
Seaforth .... 

Simcoe 

Thorold .... 
Trenton .... 
Wallaceburg. 
Wiarton .... 



Villages. 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig . . . 

Ayr 

Bayfield 

Blyth 

Burlington . . . 

Bradford 

Brighton 

Caledonia 
Campbell ford . 

Cayuga 

Colborne 

Delhi 

Dundalk 

Exeter 

Fergus 

Georgetown . . 

Glencoe 

Marmora 

Point Edward. 
Port Colborne 
Port Dover . . . 
Shelburne 

Tara 

Weston 



Totals. 



CP o 



if o 

CP O 

O cc 



g.S 

W CP 

d & 



179 



osjg 



CO £ 
CP — 

■ O 



20 



1 
2 
9 
6 

30 

15 
1 
2 

18 
9 
2 

10 
5 
4 
8 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
1 
1 
6 

15 



5 c 

►.bo 

-° * 

*a O 
C 0D 
CP +f 



o2 

• ^ CP 

dO 



2,022 



CP 

| Oh 



.Sll.2 

£S 

o 

O CP 



d^ 



1,379 



o 
c 

CP 
CO 



1 1 



152 



71 195 



60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Table N.— Report on Kindergartens. 



Cities : 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London 

Ottawa 

Peterborough. 

Stratford 

Toronto 



ce 
C 

OS 

£ CO 

£ 



Towns : 

Aylmer 

Berlin 

Cobourg 

Dundas 

Gait 

Hespeler 

Ingersoll 

Listowel 

Owen Sound 

Picton 

Preston 

Simcoe 

Tillsonburg. 
Toronto Junction. 

Waterloo 

Welland 



5 
3 
1 

14 

4 

15 

15 

3 

?. 

46 



Totals 



133 



11 
8 
2' 

18 
4 

30 

27 

7 

5 

118 



6 

2 
1 

260 



5 

?, 
1 

14 
4 

15 

lb 
3 
3 

46 



08 



M 



B.S 



oS cc 

<1 



'n ^ 

6 * 



134 



126 



310 
392 
350 
396 
325 
425 
415 
428 
383 
464 



300 

370 

350 

400 

450 

325 

300 

325 

308 

300 

325 

350 

300 

392 

375 

250 

410 



206 
240 
150 
234 



> * 



272 
250 
137 
200 
306 



150 



100 



217 
300 



274 



523 
329 
113 

1,363 
190 

1,145 

1,199 
266 
416 

5,1& 



45 

248 
85 
86 
43 
66 
82 
82 

339 
82 
45 

101 
82 

259 
69 
65 

12,480 



224 

138 

37 

486 
128 
452 

487 

102 

127 

1,887 



Table O.— Report on Night Schools. 










C 


CP 

o 




-u 




PS 


■an 














&0 rA 






^ 4) 


Municipality. 


^ o 
o 


A 

o 

OS 

CD 

H 


CO 


1 

1 Average 

1 Rtt 


St. Catharines 


1 

9 


2 
15 


32 

588 


4 

282 


Toronto 


10 


17 


620 


286 






_ 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



61 



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68 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




l!)Wi 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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70 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX C.— INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS. -Concluded. 
List of Inspectors, December, 1906. — Concluded. 



Other Inspectors, 
December, 1996. 



Post Office. 



Separate School Inspectors 

Wm. Prendergast, B.A. 

Michael O'Brien 

John F. Power, M.A... 



Inspector of Bilingual Separate 
Schools : 

Telesphore Rochon, B.A. 

(East) 

*D. Chenav (West) 



Inspector of Technical Education 
Albert H. Leake 



Count ij Model School Inspector 
John J. Tilley 

High School Inspectors ; 



J. E. Wetherell, B.A. 
H. B. Spotton, M.A. . 



Totals 

Totals, Public School In- 
spectors 



Totals, all Inspectors 



Toronto 

Peterborough.. 
London 



Clarence Creek 
Windsor 



Toronto 



Toronto 



Toronto 
Toronto 



il- 
ls 



269 
203 

258 



169 
49 



Salary of 

Inspector of 

1905. 



1,700 00 
1,700 00 
1,700 00 



1,700 00 
500 Oo 



1,700 00 
1,850 00 



2.750 00 
2,750 00 



16,350 00 
111,028 16 



127,378 16 



Travelling 

expenses 

paid, 1905. 



400 00 
519 75 
522 80 



446 85 



528 30 



400 40 



560 30 
447 04 



3,825 44 
13,235 88 



17,061 32 



Total 
allowance 
for salary 

and 
expenses, 

1905. 



2,100 00 
2,219 75 
2,222 80 



2,146 85 
500 00 



2,228 30 



2,250 40 



3,310 30 
3,197 04 



20,175 44 
124,264 04 



144,439 48 



* Also Inspector of Public Schools, Essex North. 



II. Diplomas for School Premises, 1906, 



Name of Inspector. 


Jurisdiction. 


No. of schools 
reported as 
receivingdip- 
lomas in 1906. 


Name of Inspector. 

D. D. Moshier 

iP. J. Thompson . . 
H. I). Johnson. . . . 
H. Frank Cook . . 
A. Odell 


Jurisdiction. 


No. of schools 
reported as 
receivingdip- 
lomas, 1906. 


L. A. Green. 


Algoma 


8 

11 

2 

4 

18 

27 

7 

51 

5 

2 


Lambton, W 

Middlesex, K 

Middlesex, W 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . 
Waterloo, No. 1 . . 
Waterloo, No. 2 . . . 

Went worth 

R. C. Bilingual 
Separate Schools 


18 


T. W. Standing . . 
R. H. Cowley 


Brant 


40 


Carleton 


9 


S Huff . . 


Grey, E 


2 


J S Deacon 


Ilalton 


4 


D Robb 


Huron, E 

1 luron, W 

Kent, W 

Kent, E 


T. Pearee 


12 


J. Elgin Tom 

Robt. Park 

W II. G. Colles . . 


F W. Sheppard. . . 

J. H. Smith 

T. Rochon 


13 
27 


F. L. Michel 1 .... 


Lanark 


24 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



71 



APPENDIX D.— RURAL PUBLIC SCHOOL LIBRARIES, 1905-6. 

Every rural school board that has established a Library under the conditions of the regulations 
receives a grant, equivalent to half the amount exoended for the year, but not exceed- 
ing $10. 



Inspectorate. 



Brant 



Bruce, E. . 
Bruce, W. 



Carleton . 



Dufferin. 



Name of school (section number and 

township) and amount expended 

for books recommended, dur- 

the academic vear. 



1A Brantford $ 9 90 

3 " 36 50 

5 " 20 00 

20 " 13 00 

11 Burford 19 00 

15 " 27 58 

21 " 20 00 

22 Brantford 20 02 

2 Onondago 20 93 

5 " 20 00 

12 South Dumfries 20 55 

HCarrick 11 35 

10 Amabel 10 00 

16 Bruce 43 00 

4 Culross 5 00 

9 " 10 00 

1 Greenock 20 00 

1 Huron - 11 57 

12 " 10 00 

15 " 14 75 

5 Kincardine 10 00 

2 Saugeen 20 00 

4 " 10 00 

5 " 30 00 

8 Fitzroy 11 20 

9 Gloucester 24 80 

13 " 10 00 

25 " 5 00 

4 Goulburn 20 00 

12 " 13 10 

3 North Gower 30 00 

9 " 20 00 

4 " 20 92 

1 March 10 00 

1 Marlborough 10 00 

6 " 20 00 

16 " 10 00 

17 " 10 00 

2 Nepean 3 00 

3 " 19 85 

3 Osgoode 12 00 

12 " 10 00 

14 " 10 00 

15 " 20 00 

24 " 10 00 

1 Torbolton 12 00 

3 " 10 00 

7 Amaranth 12 00 

20 " 18 00 



8,g,2 

O <D 

d 



71 S 



*3| 

o 2 
2 o 2 
■z^ S 



$ c. 



227 48 



21 35 



184 32 



321 8< 



03 
> 

o . 



be 



$ c. 



100 95 



10 6^ 



75 65 



153 07 



O CO 

& 0} 

d£ 



32 



30 






& 

fc 



42 



72 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX J). — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Dufferin. — Con. 



Dundas 



Durham 



Elgin. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended, dur- 
ing the academic year. 



2 Melancthon $15 00 

6 " 20 00 

1 Williamsburg 20 00 

3 " 20 00 

5 " 20 00 

10 " 20 00 

14 " 10 00 

22 " 20 00 

12 Matilda 22 00 

13 " 20 00 

19 " 20 00 

23 " 20 00 

10 Mountain 20 00 

15 and 17 Mountain 20 00 

22 Mountain 18 28 

4 Winchester 22 84 

7 " 25 25 

11 " 10 16 

16 " 20 00 

18 " 20 00 

10 Clarke 36 68 

3 Darlington 13 00 

17 " 6 00 

18 " 10 00 

7 Cartwright 22 00 

4 Manvers 11 55 

1 Aldborough 7 25 

2 " 20 00 

3 " 26 00 

6 " 20 00 

10 " 6 25 

11 " 15 00 

5 " 5 50 

3 Baybam 1 15 

8 " 85 

9 •' 1 25 

17 " 20 00 

18 " 7 59 

5 Dunwich 24 00 

9 " 2 20 

15 •' 3 83 

1 Malahide 1 85 

3 " 30 

6 " 20 00 

7 " 3 00 

13 " 10 00 

15 " 20 00 

16 " 1 85 

21 " 3 02 

5 S. Dorchester 50 

6 " 5 00 

7 " 3 12 

10 " 4 37 

11 " 7 00 



a o 



1* 



a 

o 
o 

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hi 

<X> <d 



03 v si ~ 

o ^^^ 



$ c. 
65 00 



348 53 



99 23 



a 

c 

CD 

> 

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^ C 
^3 <* 

% ^ 



$ c. 
32 50 



169 22 



40 27 



.2 



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20 



31 



10 






15 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



73 



APPENDIX J). — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Elgin. — Con. 



Essex, N. 
Essex, S. 



Frontenac 



Glengarry 



Grey, E. . 
Grey, W. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended, dur- 
ing the academic year. 



8-5 ° § 

§ a M . 

S ,2 ^T5 
d <n ° <= 

H 



1 South wold $ 

2 " 

3 " 

6 " 

7 " 

10 " 

11 " 

12 " 

13 " 

14 " 

17 " 

19 " 

21 " 

2 Yarmouth 

3 " 



3 Maidstone 36 12 

6 Sandwich, S 19 67 

7 Gosfield, N 10 60 

5 " S 6 50 

3 " " 20 50 

7 Mersea 20 00 

4 " 20 00 

2 " 11 02 

6 Loughborough 20 00 

13 " 20 00 

1 'Olden 15 00 

3 0so 20 00 

7 Pittsburgh 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

6 Portland 20 00 

7 " 20 00 

3 Wolfe Island 20 00 

3 Kenyon 8 75 

3Lochiel, E 20 00 



1 Derby 20 00 

U. 7 Derby and Keppel 17 00 

U. 2 Derby and Sydenham 20 00 

12 Holland * 20 75 

U. 7 Holland and Elderslie 31 71 

XL 2 Holland and Sullivan 21 25 

11 Holland and Sydenham 17 40 



424 67 



55 79 



88 62 



175 00 

28 75 






$ c. 



206 10 



20 00 



44 06 



87 50 



14 37 



o 



CO 

■fi£ 



1 o a 



104 



88 



tv 



O -^ 



74 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Grey, W. — Con. 



Grey, S , 



Haldimand 



Haliburton, etc. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expen ed 
for books recommended, dur- 
ing the academic year. 



4 Keppel $10 15 

7 " 20 85 

8 " 27 00 

12 " 15 00 

2 " anc Sarawak 16 00 

3 Sarawak 11 24 

2 Sullivan 15 00 

9 " 20 00 

16 Sydenham 10 00 

11 Bentinck 20 18 

6 Egremont 20 80 

7 " 5 45 

10 " 10 00 

U. 15 Egremont and Arthur 20 30 

5 Egremont 10 00 

1 Normanbv 10 50 

4 " * 20 47 

5 •' 8 41 

3 Proton 20 40 

3Cavuga, S \ 8 00 

5 Dunn 10 00 

11 Walpole 21 64 



4 Dysart 25 

2 Laurier 8 

1 Lutterworth 12 

2 " 

5 Machar 

3Minden 17 

3 Nipissing 28 

L Snowdon 17 

2 Stanhope 30 00 

2 Stisted 33 00 



00 
25 

40 
11 00 
20 00 
60 
00 
00 



Halton 


3 Esquesing 

10 " 


20 95 

20 00 




11 " 

14 " 


20 00 

30 00 




7 Nassagaweya ....... 

8 " 


24 00 

30 00 




4 Nelson 

8 " 


8 81 

32 00 




7 Trafalgar 

12 " 


20 00 

5 00 


Hastings, N 


1 Dungannon 

4 " 

7 " 


10 09 

12 00 

20 00 




1 Elzevir 

3 " 


32 15 

20 00 




4 " 


1 5 00 




6 " 

6 Faraday 

19 Madoc 


12 40 

22 05 

35 05 



.5 ° 
d 

63 
OS 






O <D 



1 Marmora 11 64 



$ c. 



293 35 



146 51 



39 64 



o 

OS f* 



^r2 



O !» 



135 90 



72 17 



19 00 



202 25 



210 76 



83 12 



£* ."2 J3 
fi .13 ® 



23 



19 



11 



30 



86 90 



15 



18 



1006 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



75 



APPENDIX B. — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Hastings, N. 
Con 



Hastings, S. 



Huron, E. 



Huron, W. 



Kent, E. 



Kent, W. 



Name of school ('section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended, dur- 
ing the academic year. 



2 Marmora $25 00 

6 " 24 00 

3 Monteagle 20 57 

6 " 12 05 

1 Wollaston 9 81 

6 " 21 71 

3 Rawdon 11 00 

5 " 21 07 

7 " 9 77 

13 " 18 90 

12 Huntington 22 50 

1 Hungerford 20 00 

13 Sydney 20 00 

1 1 Tyendinaga 25 05 

4 Grev 10 60 

5 " " 17 00 

11 " 28 40 

3 Hullett 21 30 

5 Morris 1 2 50 

9 Tuckersmith 10 00 

2 Turnberry 10 00 

4 Ashfield and Huron 20 00 

3 Colborne 20 00 

11 Goderich 21 CO 

6 Stanley 10 66 

14 " 20 00 

6'Usborne 20 00 

5 " 10 00 

1 Camden 20 00 

4 " 20 00 

5 " 20 00 

2 Harwich 40 00 

3 " 20 00 

7 " 12 00 

11 " ■ ■ 30 00 

12 " 5 00 

16 " 20 00 

3 Howard 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

14 " 7 00 

2 Orford 40 00 

4 Zone 10 00 

I Chatham 20 00 

4 " 20 00 

6 N. " 14 00 

6S. " 18 00 

8 " 20 00 

9 " 13 20 

4 N. Raleigh 3 65 

14 " 6 00 

3 U. " 25 00 

7 " 25 00 



®T«2 o 

r-( ~ i- ~ 

T3 o - 



$ c. 



386 76 



65 05 



109 80 



$ c. 



oil 

id 



171 31 60 



30 00 



121 96 



284 00 



164 85 



50 05 



60 33 



117 00 



7 43 



26 



20 



36 






O .Q aJ 



14 



2 3 



76 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX D. — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Lambton, YV 



Lambton, E. 



Lanark 



Leeds and Gren- 
ville, Nr\ 1 . . . 

Leeds and Gren- 
ville, No. 2 . . . 



Leeds and Gren- 
ville, No. 3 . . . 

Lennox and Ad- 
dington 



Lincoln 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year'. 



8 Bosanquet $20 10 

9 " 10 60 

13 " 5 00 

7 Moore 4 90 

7 Plymton 10 50 

11 " 20 00 

20 " 18 00 

10 Sombra 13 00 

13 Dawn 11 85 

4 Euphemia 17 76 

12 Warwick 16 99 

4Bathurst 10 00 



10 00 

12 00 

Beckwith 14 00 

15 00 

10 00 

N. " 20 58 

20 00 

10 00 



Dalhousie 

11 Drummond 10 00 

13 " 10 00 

5 Lavant 12 00 

8 Montague 8 00 

9 Ramsay 20 00 

10 " 20 00 

15 " 20 00 

6 8. Elmsley 10 00 

21 Elizabethtown 20 00 

27 " 21 56 

11 Kitley 20 00 

15 " 10 00 

8 Wolford 10 00 



4 Camden 20 00 

5 Ernesttown 12 50 

2 Gainsborough 20 00 

3 " 20 00 

5 " 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

3 Grantham 20 00 

5 " 20 00 

6 " 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

1 Clinton 20 00 

4 < ; 20 00 

1 " and 2 Louth 20 00 

5 " and 7 Gainsboro 20 00 

2 Louth 50 00 

6 " 20 00 



S o 



53 
O 






o3 



C 

o 



CD rj 



$ c. 



102 10 



46 60 



221 58 
10 00 



81 56 



I c- 



51 00 



23 30 



110 50 
5 00 



40 00 



32 50 



16 25 



O 02 

_i CD 



rjj . 



■£H3 

OX! ^ 



12 



38 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



77 



APPENDIX D. — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Lincoln. — Con. 



Middlesex, E . . 



Middlesex, W. 



Norfolk 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 



7 Louth 22 00 

3 " and 2 Clinton 20 00 

4 " and 3 " 45 59 

8 " and 2 Grantham 20 00 

5 Niagara 20 00 

6 " 20 00 

*6 " 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

9 " 20 00 

10 " 20 00 

11 S. Grimsby 20 00 

12 " 20 00 

13 N. " 20 00 

6 " and Clinton 20 00 



Delaware . 
Dorchester 



and 9 Dorchester & Westminster 

London 

and 10 London and Biddulph . 
London 



and 1 London and Dorchester. 
McGillivray 



Nissouri W . 
Westminster 



& 21 Westminster & Dorchester 



10 00 

4 28 
21 30 
20 00 
12 30 

19 31 

20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
20 00 
18 02 
20 00 

7 85 

5 50 
20 00 
20 08 
20 08 
20 50 



U. 2 Adelaide and E. Williams. . . 13 81 

5 Lobo 10 00 

8 " 20 00 

6 East Williams 21 39 

12 West " 34 00 

7 East " 9 15 

11 Ekfrid 10 00 

U. 17 Mosa 16 28 

6 Charlotteville 12 10 

12 " 11 00 

14 " 27 40 

18 " 5 00 

8 Houghton 5 50 

10 " 16 16 

11 " 14 00 

8 Middleton 15 00 

17 Townsend 20 00 

9 N. Walsingham 16 34 

16 " 10 00 

2S. " 12 38 

E19 " 11 61 

12 Windham 3 50 



8.5 ° 

C T3 S- 



o3 



o 
3® 



ft 

og.S 

.fa 



$ c. 



617 59 



280 00 



m > 

si 



50 



299 22 



134 63 



148 64 



39 



59 61 



179 99 



29 



20 



15 



35 



For 1904-5. 



78 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPPENDIX D. — Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Northumberland 



Ontario, N. 



Ontario, S. 



Oxford 



Parrv Sound, W. 



Peel 



Perth. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 



19 Brighton 30 00 

18 Haldimand 30 00 

20 " 20 00 

7 Hamilton 20 00 

10 " 22 50 

9 Brock 20 00 

2 ' ; 20 00 

12 " 20 00 

13 " 20 00 

6 Mara 10 00 

3 " 20 00 

7 " 20 00 

8 " 20 00 

6 Scott 20 00 

7 " 20 00 

1 Thorah 10 00 

5 " 20 00 

9 Uxbridge 20 00 

9 Pickering 19 80 

15 Reach 10 19 

1 Whitby 20 00 

7 Blenheim 20 00 

U. 4 Blandford 41 00 

6 Dereham 20 00 

3 East Zorra 20 40 

6 " 30 00 

8 " 20 61 

8 Carling r 6 00 

1 Croft 15 77 

U. 1 Ferrie 11 0* 

2 Hagerman 20 00 

5 " 15 00 

1 Humphrey 20 00 

U. 4 " 10 00 

U. 2 McDougall 20 00 

5 Caledon 23 75 

10 " 35 00 

5 Toronto 21 76 

*5 " 24 00 

13 Blanshard 20 00 

6 Downie 20 00 

7 " 20 00 

8 " 20 66 

5 North Easthope 20 00 

7 " " 20 00 

4 Ellice 20 00 

10 " 20 00 

5 Elma 33 82 

9 " 30 00 

5 Fullarton 5 53 



8.3 ° 

3 08 

O n; 

H 



GO — 

O c 



$ c. 



122 50 



O CO 

,Q 08 08 

Z> *- *" 

O aj 

O o c 

rP 



$ c. 



50 00 



240 00 



49 99 



152 01 



117 81 



104 51 



120 00 



25 00 



60 00 



« fi 



CO I 

■gS 

5 a? 
J bo 

. co c 

6 ©-9 



i<; 



<>i 



21 



16 



58 90 25 



40 00 



20 



* For 1903-04. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



79 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Perth— Co 



Peterboro' 



Prescott and 
Russell 



Prince Edward. 



Rainy River 



Renfrew 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 



U. 5 Fullarton 20 00 

9 Logan 20 00 

1 Mornington 20 00 

2 " 30 00 

4 " 21 27 

1 Wallace 20 45 

3 " 10 74 

4 " 13 12 

6 " 8 06 

4 Harvev 20 00 

1 Otonabee 10 00 

7 Smith 10 00 

1 Alfred 2 00 

4 Caledonia 20 35 

8 " 10 00 

15 Clarence 19 97 

2 Cumberland 1 50 

3 " 20 00 

4 " 20 00 

5 " 19 00 

4 E, Longueuil 20 00 

1 N. Plantagenet 15 15 

14 '• 6 84 

1 South Plantagenet 23 15 

1 Athol 20 00 

3 " 20 00 

4 " 23 30 

5 Hallowell 13 58 

7 " 20 53 

11 " 20 00 

3 Hillier 20 00 

6 " 14 94 

10 S. Marvsburgh 20 00 

1 Sophiasburgh 14 00 

2 " 20 00 

7 " 20 00 

8 " 20 20 

12 " 4 00 



3 Crozier 

2 Devlin 

2 Dobie 

1 Morley and Patullo 
1 Nepigon 



5 00 
20 00 
20 00 
22 00 
20 00 



Bagot 8 50 

Brudenell 22 00 

Pembroke 10 00 

Ross 16 45 

Stafford 10 25 

Westmeath 20 00 

27 10 

20 56 

19 10 



tx 






5 c 



393 65 



40 00 



177 9ft 



250 55 



87 00 



O o e 



^5 

XL C 

£ to 
o o>.S 



$ c. 



178 73 



20 0, 



60 



H) 



87 23 31 



123 26 



42 50 



28 



80 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Renfrew — Con. 



Simcoe, N 



Simcoe, E. and 
W. Mupkoka. 



Stormont. 



Victoria W. and 
S.E. Muskoka. 



Waterloo, No. 1 



Waterloo, No. 2. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 



1 Wilberforce 10 00 

6 Wilberforce and N. Algona ... 7 75 

3 Nottawasaga 23 80 

4 " 17 45 

9 " 20 00 

12 " 20 00 

14 " 15 45 

U.21&17 " andCollingwood. 19 65 

U.2 " andOsprey 19 92 

1 Vespra 12 00 

7 " 17 00 

3 " andOro 10 00 

5 Flos 20 00 

10 " 11 24 

10 Tiny 18 80 

2 Flos 33 00 

4 Oro 37 92 

16 " 33 60 

17 " 24 30 

2 Medora 20 00 

12 Matchedash 12 00 

12 Medonte 26 35 

4 Watt 32 00 

1 Wood 34 25 

2 " 23 75 

3 Tay 28 00 

17 " 20 00 

2 Cornwall 14 48 

3 Finch. 20 08 

6 " 53 00 

4 Osnabruck 10 98 

15 " 17 60 

1 Garden 10 00 

7 " 8 00 

2 Fenelon 10 00 

6 "' 10 00 

13 " .. 15 56 

5 Mariposa 8 50 

6 " 20 60 

15 " 10 16 

U. 20 " 10 00 

8 Macaulay 10 00 

7 Ryde 10 00 

1 McLean 15 00 

1 Waterloo 20 00 

6 " 20 00 

10 " 20 00 

8 Woolwich 10 00 

19 Wellesley 20 46 

16 " 20 00 



6C *- 
fl O 



GT3 






CJ oq i-r) 



» ° « 



$ c. 

171 71 



225 31 



325 17 



116 14 



137 82 

70 00 
40 46 



$ c 

81 04 



110 75 



116 00 



41 53 



68 61 

35 00 

20 00 



r-. ft 






16 



13 



12 



45' 



23 

12 

7 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



81 



APPENDIX D.— Continued. 



Inspectorate. 



Wellington, N . . 



Wellington, S.. 



Wentworth 



York, N 



York, S 



R. C. Separate 
Schools, West. 



Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 






— < a <v 



1 Minto 23 43 

6 W. Luther 18 25 

18 Maryborough 5 00 

1 Erin 31 25 

8 " 20 00 

12 " 16 85 

13 " 19 00 

16 " 12 00 

6 Garafraxa 20 00 

8 " 19 60 

2 Guelph 20 00 

5 " 6 00 

1 Puslinch 25 00 

* Macdonald Consolidated School 

Guelph Tp 33 43 

14 Ancaster 20 00 

10 " 10 00 

8 " 10 00 

3 Barton 15 00 

5 Beverly 20 00 

9 " 20 85 

6 Flamboro E 20 00 

8 Flamboro W 16 09 

9 " 20 37 
3 Saltfleet ....... .*.'..... 10 60 

3 N. Gwillimbury 6 50 

4 E. Gwillimbury 10 00 

2 King 30 21 

10 " 7 9 7 

9 Vaughan 10 

6 " 11 7 4 

16 " 13 1 5 

1 Etobicoke 20 26 

3 " 14 99 

21 Markham ....'.'.'.'....'.'.'...... 3 75 

*2 Markham and Vaughan 20 00 

2 " " 20 00 

5 Scarboro' 10 00 

9 " 15 00 

7 Vaughan 10 00 

9 York 10 00 

22 " 10 00 

6 Arthur 21 13 

2 Ashfield 11 40 

6 Biddulph 3 96 

1 Carrick and Culross 35 00 

2 Maidstone 12 48 

5 Sandwich, S 10 95 

7 Sandwich, S 11 87 

5 Bombra 16 00 

13 Waterloo 15 00 

11 Wellesley 50 00 

* For 1904-5. 



o fl 






$ c. 

46 68 



223 13 



162 81 



89 57 



134 00 



187 79 






o3 



M3 



$ C. 

21 63 



96 72 



80 79 



39 70 



66 87 



.* a) 
22 * 

-2 to 

• S fl 
o *>•» ■« 



32 



33 



31 



50 



70 82 27 



6 BD. 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX D.— Concluded. 



Inspectorate. 


Name of school (section number and 
township) and amount expended 
for books recommended dur- 
ing the academic year. 


Total amount ex- 
pended during 
the year for 
books recom- 
mended. 


-+3 

a 
<u 

3 

a 

> 
O 


No. of public 
school libraries 
in inspectorate. 


No. of libraries 
established dur- 
ing year. 


R. C. Separate 
Schools, Central 


1 York 20 00 


$ c. 

20 00 

9,477 88 
11,641 85 


$ c. 
10 00 

4,343 24 

5,265 80 


3 
1,587 




Totals, 1905-6 


268 




" 1904-5 


1,231 458 


» 


Increases 


356 






Decreases 


2,163 97 


922 56 


190 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



83 



Amount of Government Grant. 


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THE REPORT OF THE 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



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1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPENDIX F.—FREE TEXT BOOKS IN RURAL SCHOOLS, 1906. 



Inspectorate. 



Huron West 

Lanark 

Middlesex, West 

Perth, 

Wentworth 



Totals, 1906. 
Totals, 1905. 
Increases . . . 



Name of school (section number and 

township) and amount expended 

for text books. 



4Goderich, $11.74 

4 Darling, $17.60 ; 1 Lavant, $10.71. .. . 
KKLobo, $4.35; 6 E. Williams, $25.04 

1 Blanshard, $2.68 

8 Barton, $25 .25 



7 schools. 



Total 


amount 


expended . 


$ c. 


11 74 


28 31 


29 39 


2 68 


25 25 


97 37 


58 22 


39 15 



Total 
amount of 
Legisla- 
lati ve aid. 



$ c. 

5 87 
14 15 
14 69 

1 34 
12 62 

48 67 
29 11 
19 56 



IN16 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



97 



APPENDIX G.— PROCEEDINGS FOR THE YEAR 1906. 

I. Regulations and Circulars. 

Apportionment of the General Legislative Public School 
Grant for 1906. 

The apportionment of the Grant to the several municipalities is based 
upon the latest Returns of Population for the year 1905 and the division be- 
tween the Public and Separate Schools on the average attendance of that 
year as reported by the Inspectors, Public School Boards and Separate School 
Trustees respectively. 

While the Separate Schools will receive their portion of the Grant direct 
from the Department, that of the Public Schools will be paid, according to 
this Schedule, through the respective County, City, Town, and Village 
Treasurers. 

Under the provisions of Section 5 of ''An Act respecting the Education 
Department, 1901," the Education Department is empowered to appropriate 
out of moneys voted by the Legislature for Public and Separate Schools a 
sum not exceeding |5.00 for every school in which the Regulations of the 
Department as to equipment, ventilation, heating, lighting and the care of 
the premises generally have been complied with. 

Each County Inspector is therefore authorized to deduct from the ap- 
portionment of each township such an amount as will provide the sum of 
|5.00 to be paid on his order to each Trustee Board that has complied with 
the requirements mentioned. 

May, 1906. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL APPORTIONMENT TO COUNTIES FOR 1906 



1. COUNTY OF BRANT. 



3. COUNTY OF CARLETON. 



Municipalities. 

Brantford 

Burford 

Dumfries, South 

Oakland 

Onondaga 



Apportionment. 

$574 00 

478 00 

• 280 00 

82 00 

119 00 



Total $1,533 00 



2. COUNTY OF BRUCE. 



Albemarle ... 

Amabel 

Arran 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carrick 

Culross 

Eastnor 

Elde.rslie 

Greenock .... 

Huron 

Kincardine ... 

Kinloss 

Lindsay 

St. Edmunds 
Saugeen 



$165 00 
296 00 
253 00 
388 00 
322 00 
276 00 
201 00 
122 00 
213 00 
225 00 
360 00 
307 00 
237 00 
88 00 
56 00 
161 00 



Total $3,670 00 

7 E. 



Municipalities. 

Fitzroy 

Gloucester 

Goulbourn 

Gower, North 

Huntley 

March 

Marlborough .. 

Nepean 

Osgoode 

Torbolton 



Apportionment. 

$280 00 

456 00 

275 00 

228 00 

237 00 

83 00 

164 00 

514 00 

461 00 

110 00 



Total $2,808 00 



4. COUNTY OF DUFFERIN. 



Amaranth 

Garafraxa, East 
Luther, East ... 

Melancthon 

Mono 

Mulmur 



$280 


00 


21.7 


00 


184 


00 


392 


CO 


331 


00 


328 


00 



Total $1,732 00 



98 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



5. COUNTY OF ELGIN. 

Municipalities. Apportionment,. 

Aldborough $540 00 

Bayham 441 00 

Dorchester, South 183 00 

Dunwich 369 00 

Malahide 418 00 

Southwold 405 00 

Yarmouth 541 00 

Total $2,897 00 



6. COUNTY OF ESSEX. 

Anderdon $175 00 

Colchester, North 223 00 

Colchester, South 342 00 

Gosfidd, North 222 00 

Gosfield, South 246 00 

Maidstone 248 00 

Maiden 108 00 

Mersea 474 00 

Pelee, Island 76 00 

Rochester 107 00 

Sandwich, East 89 00 

Sandwich, West 198 00 

Sandwich, South 139 00 

Tilbury, North 53 00 

Tilbury, West 200 00 

Total $2,900 00 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Euphrasia 330 00 

Glenelg 232 00 

Holland 282 00 

Keppel 417 00 

Normanby 463 00 

Osprey 345 00 

Proton 390.00 

Sarawak 171 00 

St. Vincent 307 00 

Sullivan 336 00 

Sydenham 370 00 

Total $5,353 00 



9. COUNTY OF HALDIMAND. 

Canborough $103 00 

Cayuga, North 181 00 

Cayuga, South 84 00 

Dunn 94 00 

Moulton 202 00 

Oneida 151 00 

Rainham 206 00 

Seneca 194 00 

Sherbrooke 41 00 

Walpole 326 00 

Total $1,582 00 



7. COUNTY OF FRONTENAC. 

Barrie $ 62 00 

Bedford 163 00 

Clarendon and Miller 95 00 

Hinchinbrooke 141 00 

Howe Island 

Kennebec 136 00 

Kingston 284 00 

Loughborough 181 00 

Olden 126 00 

Oso 128 00 

Palmerston and N. and S. 

Canonto 112 00 

Pittsburg 251 00 

Portland 229 00 

Storrington 209 00 

Wolfe Island 94 00 

Total $2,211 00 



10. COUNTY OF HALIBURTON. 

Anson and Hindon $ 30 00 

Cardiff 72 00 

Dudley, Dysart, Harcourt, 

Harburn, Guilford 105 00 

Glamorgan 58 00 

Livingstone 

Lutterworth 54 00 

McClintock 6 00 

Minden 133 00 

Monmouth 67 00 

Nightingale 

Sherbourne 26 00 

Snowdon ■ 82 00 

Stanhope 55 00 

Total $693 00 



8. COUNTY OF GREY. 

Artemesia $373 00 

Bentinck 371 00 

Collingwood 398 00 

Derby 217 00 

Egremont 351 00 

7a E. 



11. COUNTY OF HALTON. 

Esquesing $396 00 

Nassagaweya 246 00 

Nelson ...'. 299 00 

Trafalgar 372 00 

Total $1,313 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



99 



12. COUNTY OF HASTINGS. 



15. COUNTY OF LAMBTON 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Bangor, Wicklow and McClure $121 00 

Carlow 79 00 

Dungannon 91 00 

Elzevir and Grimsthorpe L59 00 

Faraday 91 00 

Hungerford 399 00 

Huntingdon 249 00 

Herschell and Monteagle 207 00 

Limerick 62 00 

Madoo 316 00 

Marmora and Lake 172 00 

Mayo 64 00 

Rawdon 369 00 

Sidney 449 00 

Thurlow 408 00 

Tudor and Cashel 99 00 

Tyendinaga 312 00 

Wollaston 99 00 

Total $3,746 00 



13. COUNTY OF HURON. 

Ashfield $295 00 

Colborne 198 00 

Gode,rich 292 00 

Grey 360 00 

Hay 343 00 

Howick 434 00 

Hullett 297 00 

McKillop 238 00 

Morris 272 00 

Stanley 209 00 

Stephen 409 00 

Tuckersmith 245 00 

Turnberry 240 00 

Usborne 251 00 

Wawanosh, East 208 00 

Wawanosh, West 207 00 

Total $4,498 00 



14. COUNTY OF KENT. 

Camden $286 00 

Chatham 606 00 

Dover 373 00 

Harwich 492 00 

Howard • 321 00 

Orford 257 00 

Raleigh 463 00 

Romney 208 00 

Tilbury, East '..... 318 00 

Zone 130 00 

Total $3,454 00 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Bosanquet $302 00 

Brooke 364 00 

Dawn 401 00 

Enniskillcn 475 00 

Euphemia 225 00 

Moore 504 00 

Plympton 397 00 

Sarnia 242 00 

Sombra 437 00 

Warwick 342 00 

Total $3,689 00 



16. COUNTY OF LANARK. 

Bathurst $251 00 

Beckwith 182 00 

Burgess, North 41 00 

Dalhousie and Sherbrooke, 

North 180 00 

Darling 82 00 

Drummond 224 00 

Elmsley, North 113 00 

Lanark 196 00 

Lavant 58 00 

Montague > 223 00 

Pakenham 187 00 

Ramsay 241 00 

Sherbrooke, South 93 00 

Total $2,071 00 



17. COUNTY OF LEEDS. 

Bastard and Burgess, South... $312 00 

Crosby, North 112 00 

Crosby, South 164 00 

Elizabethtown 453 00 

Elmslev, South 83 00 

Escott, Front 124 00 

Kitley 220 00 

Leeds and Lansdowne, Front 285 00 

Leeds and Lansdowne, Rear... 250 00 

Yonge and Escott. Rear 140 00 

Yonge, Front 151 00 

Total $2,294 00 



17. (a) COUNTY OF GRENVILLE. 

Augusta $415 00 

Edwardsburg 388 00 

Gower, .South 86 00 

Oxford, Rideau 299 00 

Wolford 180 00 

Total $1,368 00 



100 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



18. COUNTY OF LENNOX AND 
ADDINGTON. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Adolphnstown $ 68 00 

Amherst Island 94 00 

Anglesea, Effingham and Kala- 

dar 139 00 

Camden, East 500 00 

Denbigh, Abinger and Ashley 117 00 

Ernestown 324 00 

Fredericksburgh, North 167 00 

Fredericksburgh, South 106 00 

Richmond 262 00 

Sheffield 208 00 

Total $1,985 00 



22. COUNTY OF NORTHUMBER- 
LAND. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Alnwick $109 00 

Brighton 259 00 

Cramahe, : 273 00 

Haldimand 373 00 

Hamilton 420 00 

Monaghan, South 104 00 

Murray 311 00 

Percy 302.00 

Seymour 327 00 

Total '.. $2,478 00 



19. COUNTY OF LINCOLN 



Caistor $188 00 

Clinton 212 00 

Gainsborough 245 00 

Grantham 232 00 

Grimsby, North 148 00 

Grimsby, South 155 00 

Louth 208 00 

Niagara 205 00 

Total $1,593 00 



20. COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

Adelaide $215 00 

Biddulph 182 00 

Caradoc 414 00 

Delaware 173 00 

Dorchester, North 407 00 

Ekfrid 284 00 

Lobo 293 00 

London 958 00 

McGillivray 302 00 

Metcalfe 163 00 

Mosa 220 00 

Nissouri, West 318 00 

Westminster 518 00 

Williams, East 157 00 

Williams, West 147 00 

Total $4,756 00 



21. COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 

Charlotteville $341 00 

Houghton 223 00 

Middleton 280 00 

Townsend 445 00 

Walsingham, North 233 00 

Walsingham, South 201 (H) 

Windham 373 00 

Woodhouse 217 00 

Total $2,310 00 



22. (a) COUNTY OF DURHAM. 

Cartwright $196 00 

Cavan 266 00 

Clarke 388 00 

Darlington 453 00 

Hope 350 00 

Manvers 329 00 

Total $1,982 00 



23. COUNTY OF ONTARIO. 

Brock $401 00 

Mara 294 00 

Pickering 582 00 

Rama 150 00 

Reach 383 00 

Scott 247 00 

Scugog Island 52 00 

Thorah 162 00 

Uxbridge 293 00 

Whitby, East 304 00 

Whitby 207 00 

Total $3,075 00 



24. COUNTY OF OXFORD. 

Blandford $181 00 

Blenheim 495 00 

Dereham 401 00 

Nissouri, East 294 00 

Norwich, North 258 00 

Norwich, South 226' 00 

Oxford, North 141 00 

Oxford East 241 00 

Oxford, West 240 00 

Zorra, East 441 00 

Zorra, West 263 00 

Total $3,181 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



101 



25. COUNTY OF PEEL. 



29. COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWARD. 



Municipalities. Apportionment". 

Albion $252 00 

Caledon 4o4 00 

Chinguacousy 432 00 

Gore of Toronto 90 00 

Toronto -j04 00 

Total $1,712 00 

26. COUNTY OF PERTH. 

Blanshard $278 00 

Downie 276 00 

Easthope, North 248 00 

Easthope, South 223 00 

Ellice 285 00 

Elma 417 00 

Fullarton 246 00 

Hibbert 182 00 

Logan 334 00 

Mornington 311 00 

Wallace 307 00 

Total $3,107 00 

27. COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH. 

Anstruther $ 33 00 

Asphodel 181 00 

Belmont 199 00 

Burleigh 43 00 

Cavendish 15 00 

Chandos 88 00 

Douro 248 00 

Dummer 198 00 

Ennismore 96 00 

Galway 76 00 

Harvey 119 00 

Methuen 25 00 

Monaghan, North 105 00 

Otonabee 358 00 

Smith 306 00 

Total $2,095 00 

28. COUNTY OF PRESCOTT. 

Alfred $ 36 00 

Caledonia 105 00 

Hawkesbury, East 237 00 

Hawkesbury, West 165 00 

Longueuil 60 00 

Plantagenet, North 295 00 

Plantagenet, South 184 00 

Total $1,082 00 

28. (a) COUNTY OF RUSSELL. 

Cambridge $194 00 

Clarence 149 00 

Cumberland 360 00 

Russell 143 00 

Total $846 00 



Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Ameliasburgh $288 00 

Athol 118 00 

Hallowell 342 00 

Hillier 159 00 

Marvsburg, North 130 00 

Marvsburg. South 135 00 

Siphiasburg 193 00 

Total $1,365 00 



30. COUNTY OF RENFREW. 

Admaston $240 00 

Algona, South 99 00 

Alice, and Fraser 239 00 

Bagot and Blythfield 184 00 

Brougham 63 00 

Bromley 148 00 

Brudenell and Lyndoch 156 00 

Grattan 221 00 

Griffith and Matawatchan ... 43 00 
Hagarty, Jones, Sherwood, 

Richards and Burns 210 00 

Head, Clara and Maria 38 00 

Horton 154 00 

McNab 410 00 

Pembroke 99 00 

Petewawa 124 00 

Radcliffe 43 00 

Raglan 91 00 

Rolnh, Wvlie, McKay, Bu- 
chanan 123 00 

Ross 224 00 

Sebastopol 77 00 

Stafford 97 00 

Westmeath 382 00 

Wilberforce and Algona, 

North 285 00 

Total $3,750 00 



31. COUNTY OF SIMCOE. 

Adjala $234 00 

Essa 477 00 

Floss 397 00 

GwiHimbury, West 248 00 

Innisfil 420 00 

Matchedash 49 00 

Medonte 485 00 

Nottawasaga 560 00 

Orillia 439 00 

Oro 390 00 

Sunnidale 242 00 

Tay 642 00 

Tinv 382 00 

Tecumseth 358 00 

Tossorontio 185 00 

Vespra 307 00 

Total $5,815 00 



102 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



32. COUNTY OF STORMONT. 

Municipalities. Apportionment. 

Cornwall $593 00 

Finch 377 00 

Osnabruck 546 00 

Roxborough 389 00 

Total $1,905 00 



32 (o) COUNTY OF DUNDAS. 

Matilda $375 00 

Mountain 331 00 

Williamsburg 413 00 

Winchester 384 00 

Total $1,503 00 

32 (b) COUNTY OF GLENGARRY. 

Charlottenburg $514 00 

Kenyon 447 00 

Lancaster 415 00 

Lochiel 420 00 

Total $1,796 00 

33. COUNTY OF VICTORIA. 

Bexley $ 94 00 

Carden 84 00 

Dalton 63 00 

Eldon ' 296 00 

Emily 173 00 

Fenelon 239 00 

Laxton, Digby and Longford 83 00 

Mariposa 432 00 

Ops 255 00 

Somerville 206 00 

Verulam 225 00 

Total $2,150 00 

34. COUNTY OF WATERLOO. 

Dumfries, North $223 00 

Waterloo 715 00 

W 7 ellesley 446 00 

Wilmot 485 00 

W T oolwich 452 00 

Total $2,321 00 

35. COUNTY OF WELLAND. 

Bertie ...'. $356 00 

Crowland 117 00 

Humberstone 314 00 

Pelham 282 00 

Stamford 224 00 

Thorold 199 00 

W 7 ainfleet 355 00 

Willoughby 105 00 

Total $1,952 00 



36. COUNTY OF WELLINGTON. 

Municipalities. Appoi tionment. 

Arthur $236 00 

Eramosa 285 00 

Erin 351 00 

Garafraxa, West 245 00 

Guelph 263 00 

Luther, West 226 00 

Maryborough 325 00 

Minto 335 00 

Nichol 187 00 

Peel 382 00 

Pilkington 147 00 

Puslinch 320 00 

Total $3,302 00 



37. COUNTY OF WENTWORTH. 

Ancaster $417 00 

Barton 425 00 

Beverly 441 00 

Binbrook 140 00 

Flamborough, East 274 00 

Flamborough, West 306 00 

Glanford 177 00 

Saltfleet 399 00 

Total $2,579 00 



33. COUNTY OF YORK. 

Etobicoke $499 00 

Georgina 192 00 

Gwillimbury, East 397 00 

Gwillimbury, North 175 00 

King 553 00 

Markham 580 00 

Scarborough 416 00 

Vaughan 465 00 

Whitchurch 371 00 

York 1,323 00 

Total $4,971 00 



39. DISTRICTS. 

Algoma, Manitoulin, Muskoka, 
Nipissing, Parry Sound, 
Ramv River, Thunder Bay, 
and Temiskaming, including 
rural public and separate 
schools, but not any town or 
village named in this list... $48,000 00 



Totnl $48.0(V) 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



103 



APPORTIONMENT TO ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS FOR 1906, 
PAYABLE THROUGH THIS DEPARTMENT. 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Adjala 10 $30 00 

Alfred 3 21 00 

6 21 00 

7 (with 8, Plantagenet, 

South) 10 00 

7 24 00 

8 54 00 

9 25 00 

10 80 00 

" 11 19 00 

12 28*00 

13 26 00 

14 13 00 

" 15 24 00 

Admaston 4 15 00 

Anderdon, 2, 5 and 8, (with 6 

and 9 Sandwich W.) 26 00 

3 and 4 13 00 

11 12 00 

Appleby, Casimer and 

Dunnet 1 (Nipissing) 

Arthur 3 22 00 

6 25 00 

10 30 00 

Ashfield 2 50 00 

Asphodel 4 20 00 

Augusta 15 11 00 

Balfour, 1, with 1 Ray- 
side (District of 

Algoma) ... 

Balfour, 2 (District of 

Algoma) ... 

Biddulph 3 6 00 

4 32 00 

6 13 00 

9 (with 1 McGillivray) 12 00 
Bonfield, 1A, IB, 2, 4, 5, (Dis- 
trict of Nipissing) ... 

Brant (with 3 Greenock) 2 11 00 

(with 4 Greenock) ... 3 00 

Brighton 1 (15) 16 00 

Bromley 4 17 00 

6 25 00 

7 42 00 

Brougham 1 7 00 

Burgess, North 2 27 00 

" 4 8 00 

6 8 00 

Caledonia 3, 4 and 10 16 00 

" 6 (with 7 Plantagenet S.) 13 00 

" 10 15 00 

" 12 34 00 

" 13 15 00 

Caldwell 1 (Nipissing) 

Cambridge 3 32 00 

4 28 00 

5 45 00 

6 and 7 58 00 

" 6 16 00 

14P 27 00 

15 to be app. 

Carrick 1 25 00 

(with 1 Culross) 1 53 00 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Carrick 2 19 00 

(with 2 Culross) 2 11 00 

4 30 00 

14 98 00 

Casey 3 and 4 (Temiscamingue) 

Charlottenburg 15 50 00 

Chisholm and Boulter 1 (Nipissing) 

Chisholm 2 (Nipissing) 

Clarence. 3 27 00 

5 105 00 

6 73 00 

8 43 00 

11 30 00 

' 12 19 00 

13 12 00 

14 25 00 

16 26 00 

" 17 21 00 

18 17 00 

<< 19 26 00 

« 20 18 00 

« 21 31 00 

Coleman (Temiscamingue) 

Cornwall 1 15 00 

16 71 00 

17 18 00 

Crosby, North 7 4 00 

Culross (with 1 Carrick) 1 59 00 

(with 2 Carrick) 2 11 00 

Cumberland 10 7 00 

" 11 16 00 

" 13 22 00 

" 14 29 00 

Dilke, 6 (District of Algoma) 

Downie 9 38 00 

Dover 3 72 00 

" 7 25 00 

" 9 28 00 

Dunnett and Rutter, 1 
(District of Nipis- 
sing) 

Edwardsburg 2 2 00 

Ellice 1 16 00 

" 6 32 00 

" 7 20 00 

Emily 4 37 00 

6 22 00 

Ferris, 2 (District of Nipissing) 



Finch 5 68 00 

Gibbons, 1 (District of Nipissing) 

Grant, 1 (District of Nipissing) 

Greenock, 3 (with 2 Brant) 59 00 

" 4 (with Brant) ... 14 00 

Glenelg 5 17 00 

7 26 00 

Gloucester, 1 (with 3 Osgoode) 10 00 

4, 5 and 12 7 00 

" 14 51 00 

" 15 60 00 

17 17 00 

" 20 11 00 



104 



THE REPORT OF THE 



12 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Gloucester, 22 10 00 

25 105 00 

26 25 00 

Griffith, etc 3 17 00 

Hagarty 4 45 00 

12 59 00 

Haldimand 2 37 00 

14 11 00 

Harwich 9 19 00 

Hawkesbury, East 2 58 00 

4 15 00 

6 13 00 

7 90 00 

10 46 00 

11 27 00 

12 6 00 

15 17 00 

16 9 00 

17 to be app. 

19 15 00 

Hay 1 27 00 

Hay 11 20 00 

Hibbert (1) 3 23 00 

" 2 (with McKillop and Logan) 44 00 

" 3 (with McKillop, etc. 3 00 

Howe Island 1 8 00 

2 15 00 

3 16 00 

Holland, e,tc 3 7 00 

Hullett 2 18 00 

Hungerford 14 8 00 

Keewatin, 1 (District of Algoma) 

Kenyon 12 9 00 

Kingston 8 20 00 

Lancaster 14 26 00 

Lochiel 11 15 00 

« 12A 37 00 

12B 76 00 

Logan (re 6 Ellice) 4 00 

" (with 2 Hibbert 

and McKillop) ... 1 00 

Longueuil, West 2 23 00 

4A 24 00 

7 23 00 

Loughboro' 2 9 00 

10 13 00 

Maidstone 1 29 00 

2 26 00 

" 4 (with 2 Rochester) 16 00 

8 (with 5 Sandwich S.) 24 00 

Maiden 3A 33 00 

3B 22 00 

" with Anderdon 11 3 00 

Mara 3 50 00 

March 3 42 00 

Marmora and Lake ... 1 22 00 

Mason and Cosby 1 (Dist. Nipissing) 

Matawatchan 3 17 00 

Moore 3, 4 and 5 8 00 

Mornington 4 32 00 

McGillivray, 1 (with 9 Biddnlph) 10 00 

McTntyre 3 (Algoma) 

McKillop 1 27 00 

" 3 (with Hibbert) ... 7 00 

" (2 Hibbert, etc.) ... 10 00 
McPherson and Kirkpatrick, 1 (Dis- 
trict Nipissing) 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Neelon 1 (Nipissing) 

Neipean 7 19 00 

15 93 00 

Nichol 1 11 00 

Normanby 5 14 00 

.: 10 21 00 

Osgoode 1 13 00 

2 (15) 11 00 

3 (with 1 Gloucester) > 11 00 
Papineau, 1 (see Dist. of Nipissing) 
2 
2B 

P§el 8 17 00 

" 12 13 00 

Percy 5 13 00 

Percy 12 (with 12 Seymour) 9 00 

Plantagenet, North ... 4 21 00 

7 18 00 

8 58 00 

9 31 00 
12 15 00 

Plantagenet, South ... 4 57 00 

7 53 00 
" 7 (with 6 Caledonia) 14 00 

8 9 00 
"8 (with 7 Alfred) 8 00 

11 40 00 

12 13 00 

Portland 11 20 00 

Proton 6 22 00 

Raleigh 5 21 00 

6 18 00 

Rayside, 1 (with 1 Balfour) (Algoma) 

2 " 

Richmond 10 and 17 13 00 

Rochester, 2 (with 4 Maidstone) 21 00 

3 49 00 

6 46 00 

7 30 00 

" 8 (with 11 Tilbury 

West and North) ... 8 00 

9 and 14 28 00 

11 (with 10 Tilbury N.) 7 00. 

Roxboro' 12 79 00 

16 11 00 

Russell, 1 (with 12 Winchester) 12 00 

« .. 4 19 00 

" ... 6 114 00 

« 7 20 00 

« ' ' . 8 39 00 

« ... 13 20 00 

u 14 19 00 

Sandwich, East 1 86 00 

« 2 17 00 

3 31 00 

« 4 104 00 

Sandwich, West 1 51 00 

« 4 19 00 

6 and 9 (with 2, 

5, 8 Anderdon) 25 00 
Sandwich, South, 5 (with 8 

Maidstone) 23 00 

Sandwich, South 7 27 00 

Seymour, 12 (with 12 Percy) 12 00 

Sheffield 5 28 00 

Sherwood 6 59 00 

Sombra 5 19 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



105 



School Sections. 

Stafford 

Stephen 

Springer, 1 (Dist. 
2 



Apportionment. 

2 29 00 

6 35 00 

of Nipissing) 



Stanley ... 
Sydenham 
Tilbury, N 



Tilbury 



10 (with 11 Rochester) 

11 (with 11 Tilbury W. 
and 8 Rochester) 

West, 11 (with 11 Tilbury 
N.) and 8 Rochester... 



Tilbury, East 
<< 

Tiny 

Toronto Gore 
Tyendinao;a . 



1 
3 

2 

6 

18 

20 

24 



22 00 
9 00 
71 00 
32 00 
24 00 
38 00 
17 00 

8 00 

14 00 
8 00 
16 00 
98 00 
13 00 
11 00 
19 00 
19 00 



School Sections. Apportionment. 

Tyendinaga 28 11 00 

30 14 00 

Waterloo 13 64 00 

Wawanosh, West 1 18 00 

Welleslev 5 22 00 

9 and 10 31 00 

11 77 00 

12 4 00 

Westminster 13 6 00 

Widdi field. 2 (Diet, of Nipissing) 

Williams. West 10 13 00 

Wilmot 15* 53 00 

Winchester, 12 (with 1 Russell) 13 00 

Windham 8 55 00 

Wolfe Island 1 7 00 

2 11 00 

4 36 00 

7 13 00 

Woolwich 10 34 00 

Yonge and Escott, R. 4 7 00 

York 1 43 00 



1,955 00 



106 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1906. 



CITIES. 



CITIES. 

Belleville 

Brantford 

Chatham , 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

London , 

Niagara Falls 

Ottawa 

Peterborough 

St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 

Stratford 

Toronto , 

Windsor 

Woodstock 

Total 

TOWNS. 

Alexandria , 

Alliston , 

Almonte 

Amherstburg , 

Arnprior , 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Barrie 

Berlin 

Blenhiem 

Both well 

Bowmanville 

B.acebridge 

Brampton 

Brockville 

Bruce Mines 

Cache Bay 

Carleton Place , 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Copper Cliff 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

Dresden 

Dundas , 

Dunnville 

Durham 

East Toronto 

Essex 

Forest 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Gananoque 

Goderich 

Gore Bay 

Gravenhurst 

Hanover 



Public 


Separate 


Total. 


Schools. 


Schools. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


791 00 


230 00 


1,021 00 


2,058 00 


278 00 


2,336 00 


934 00 


205 00 


1,139 00 


1,164 00 


284 00 


1,448 00 


5,838 00 


1,206 00 


7,044 00 


1,611 00 


543 00 


2,154 00 


4,435 00 


670 00 


5,105:00 


805 00 


104 00 


909 '00 


3,584 00 


4,120 00 


7,704 00 


1,171 00 


506 00 


1,677100 


1,053 00 


270 00 


1,323 00 


1,374 00 


171 00 


1,545 r 00 


1,227 00 


290 00 


1,517.00 


24,156 00 


4,075 00 


28,231 00 


1,109 00 


548 00 


1,657 00 


1,033 00 


56 00 


1,089 00 


$52,343 00 


$13,556 00 


$65,899 00 


36 00 


232 00 


268 00 


146 00 

277 00 




146 00 


69 00 


346 00 


121 00 


142 00 


263 00 


• 284 00 


178 00 


462 00 


193 00 
252 00 




193 00 




252 00 


687 00 


104 00 


791 00 


1,053 00 


333 00 


1,386 00 


180 00 
107 00 
329 00 
344 00 




180 00 




107 00 





329 00 




344 00 


315 00 

859 00 




315 00 


266 00 


1,125 00 


84 00 

85 00 
469 00 
248 00 




84 00 




85 00 




469 00 




248 00 


355 00 


150 00 


505 00 


815 00 
239 00 




815 00 




239 00 


320 00 


406 00 


726 00 


389 00 
207 00 
329 00 




389 00 




207 00 


73 00 


402 00 


277 00 
213 00 
379 00 




277 00 




213 00 




379 00 


170 00 

190 00 

6!) 00 




170 00 




190 00 


23 00 


92 00 


706 00 


204 00 


910 00 


944 00 


68 00 


1,012 00 


453 00 
450 00 




453 00 


58 00 


508 00 


96 00 
294 00 
240 00 




96 00 




294 00 




240 00 



vjm 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



107 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1906.— Continual. 



TOWNS. — Continued. 


Public 

Schools. 


Separate 
Schools. 


Total. 


Hailevbury 

Harriston 


$ c. 

55 00 

205" 00 

59-00 

260 00 

266 00 
435 00 
448 00 
283 00 
185 00 
323 00 
625 00 
247 00 

86 00 
38 00 
27 00 

245 00 
457 00 
226 00 
185 00 
234 00 

402 00 
114 00 
27! > 00 
169 00 
292 00 
271 00 
191 00 
318 00 
461 00 
545 00 

1,128 00 
240 00 
147 00 
388 00 
337 00 
385 00 
314 00 

267 00 
471 00 

403 00 
624 00 
516 00 

72 00 

261 00 

246 00 
96 00 

215 00 
264 00 
110 00 
907 00 
701 00 
210 00 
364 00 
593 00 

216 00 
139 00 
179 00 
107 00 
361 00 
342 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
55 00 




205 00 


Hawkesburv 


479 00 


538 00 


Hespeler 

Huntsville 


260 00 




266 00 


Ingersoll 

Kenora 


53 00 
94 00 


488 00 
542 00 


Kincardine 


283 00 


Kingsville 

Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 




185 00 




323 00 


216 00 


841 00 
247 00 


Little Current 




86 00 


Massey 


30 00 
144 00 


68 00 


Mattawa 


171 00 


Meaford 


245 00 


Midland 




457 00 


Mitchell 




22(5 00 


Milton 




185 00 


Mount Forest 


34 00 


2(58 00 


Napanee 


402 00 


New Liskeard 




114 00 


Newmarket 


28 00 


307 00 


Niagara 


169 00 


North Bay 

North Toronto 


159 00 


451 00 
271 00 


Oakville 


20 00 


211 00 


Orangeville 


318 00 


Orillia 


122 00 
60 00 

78 00 


583 00 


Oshawa 


605 00 


Owen Sound 

Palmerston 


1,206 00 
240 00 


Parkhill 

Paris 


30 00 
48 00 


177 00 
436 00 


Parry Sound 


337 00 


Pembroke 


251 00 


636 00 


Penetanguishene 


314 00 


Perth 


128 00 


395 00 


Petrolea 


471 00 


Picton 


37 00 

195 00 


440 00 


Port Arthur 


819 00 


Port Hope 


516 00 


Powassan 




72 00 


Prescott 


110 00 
67 00 
28 00 

163 00 


371 00 


Preston . . : 


313 00 


Rainy River 


124 00 


Renfrew 


378 00 


Ridgetown 


264 00 


Sandwich * 


127 00 

160 00 

147 00 

52 00 


237 00 


Sarnia 


1,067 00 
848 00 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Seaforth 


262 00 


Simcoe 


364 00 


Smith's Falls 




593 00 


Southhampton 




216 00 


Stavner 




139 00 


Steeiton 


99 00 

159 00 

44 00 


278 00 


Sturgeon Falls 


266 00 


St. Mary's 


405 00 




342 00 



108 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1906.— Continued. 



TOWNS.— Continued. 


Public 
Schools. 


Separate 
Schools. 


Total. 


Sudburv 


$ c. 

146 00 
130 00 

95 00 
180 00 
260 00 
1,013 00 
318 00 
194 00 

71 00 
242 00 
221 00 
307 00 
376 00 
213 00 
233 00 
298 00 
262 00 


$ c. 
234 00 


$ c. 
380 00 


Thessalon 


130 00 


Thornbury 


95 00 


Thorold 


68 00 


248 00 


Tillsonburg 


260 "00 


Toronto Junction 




1,013.00 
416100 


Trenton 


98 00 


Uxbridge 


194 "00 


Vankleek Hill 


95 00 
116 00 
66 00 
64 00 
93 00 


166 00 


Walkerton 


358 00 


Walkerville 


287 00 


Wallaceburg 


371 00 


Waterloo 


469 00 


Welland 


213100 


Whitby 

Wiarton 


32 00 


265|00 
298 00 


Wingham 




262*00 








Total 


$36,297 00 


$6,534 00 


$42,831 00 




INCORPORATED VILLAGES. 


183 00 
80 00 

93 00 
57 00 
83 00 

106 00 

105 00 

69 00 

45 00 

61 00 

94 00 
• 100 00 

86 00 




183 00 


Ailsa Craig 




80 00 






93 00 


Arkona 




57 00 




63 00 


146 00 


Athens 


106 00 




• 


105 00 


Bancroft 




69 00 


Bath 




45 00 


Bayfield 




61 00 






94 00 


Beaverton 




100 00 




"'69 '66" 


86 00 


Belle River 


69 00 


Blyth 

Bobcaygeon 


117 00 
108 00 

57 00 

118 00 
144 00 
155 00 
137 00 

92 00 
159 00 

95 00 
298 00 

119 00 
141 00 

10 00 
115 00 

48 00 
238 00 

81 00 

93 00 
(58 00 
90 00 

122 00 
80 00 


117 00 




108 00 






57 00 


Bradford 




118 00 






144 00 


Brighton 




155 00 


Brussels 




137 00 


P>urk's Falls 




92 00 






159 00 


Caledonia 




95 00 


Cainpbellford 




298 00 


( 1 annington 




119 00 


( Cardinal 




141 00 


Casselman 


72 00 . 


82 00 


Cayuga 


115 00 


( 1 halKworth 




48 00 


Chesley 




238 00 


Chesterville 


29 00 


110 00 


( 'hippawa 


93 00 


Clifford 




68 00 


Cobden 


90 00 


Colborne 




122 00 


< Jreemore 


i 


80 00 



I'M Mi 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



09 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1906 .— Continued. 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES.— Continued. 



Delhi 

Drayton 

Dundalk 

Dutton 

Eganville 

Elmira 

Elora 

Embro 

Erin 

Exeter 

Fenelon Falls 

Fergus 

Fort Erie 

Garden Island . . . 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Grand Valley 

Grimsby 

Hagersville 

Hastings 

Havelock 

Hensall 

Hintonburg 

Holland Landing 

Iroquois 

Kemptville 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

L'Orignal 

Lucan 

Lucknow 

Madoc 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Maxville 

Merrick ville 

Merritton 

Millbrook 

Milverton 

Morrisburg 

Newboro' 

Newburgh 

Newbury ........ 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg. . . 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oil Springs 

Omemee 

Ottawa East 

Paisley 

Point Edward 

Portsmouth 

Port Carling 

Port Colborne. . . . 
Port Dalhousie . . . 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



86 00 

95 00 

98 00 

103 00 

68 00 
160 00 
127 00 

67 00 

(30 00 
187 00 
142 00 
168 00 
118 00 

28 00 
166 00 

97 00 
101 00 

111 00 
115 00 

53 00 

121 00 

107 00 
140 00 

48 00 

122 00 
157 00 

149 00 
97 00 
61 00 

117 00 
95 00 

120 00 

121 00 
110 00 
113 00 

69 00 
97 00 

112 00 

150 00 

103 00 
93 00 

178 00 
51 00 
57 00 
44 00 
77 00 

149 00 

150 00 

104 00 
100 00 

79 00 

80 00 

108 00 
115 00 

53 00 

32 00 

146 00 

67 00 

124 00 

157 00 



$ c. 



60 00 



26 00 



Total. 



00 



42 00 



204 00 



32 00 



43 00 



105 00 



22 00 

36 66 



$ c. 

86 00 

95 00 

98 00 

103 00 

12S 00 

160 00 

153 00 

67 00 

• 60 00 

187 00 

142 00 

175 00 

118 00 

28 00 

166 00 

97 00 

101 00 

111 00 
115 00 

95 00 

121 00 

107 00 
350 00 

48 00 

122 00 
157 00 
149 00 

97 00 

61 00 

149 00 

95 00 

120 00 

121 00 
110 00 
113 00 

69 00 
97 00 

112 00 
193 00 

103 00 
93 00 

178 00 

51 00 

57 00 

44 00 

77 00 

149 00 

150 00 

104 00 
100 00 

79 00 
185 00 

108 00 
115 00 

75 00 

32 00 

146 00 

97 00 

124 00 

157 00 



110 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



APPORTIONMENT TO CITIES, TOWNS AND VILLAGES FOR 1906.— Continued. 



INCORPORATED VILLAGES. — Concluded. 



Port Perry 

Port Rowan . . . 
Port Stanley . . . 

Richmond 

Richmond Hill 

Rockland 

Shelburne 

Springfield . , . . 

Stirling. 

Stouffville 

Street sville 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Tara 

Teeswater 

Thamesville. . . . 

Thedford 

Tilbury 

Tiverton 

Tottenham 

Tweed 

Vienna 

Wardsville 

Waterdown 

Waterford 

Watford 

Wellington .... 

Weston 

Westport 

Winchester 

Woodbridge. . . . 

Woodville 

Wyoming 

Wroxeter 



Public 
Schools 



Total $12,920 00 



$ c. 

146 00 
75 00 
68 00 
57 00 
73 00 
27 00 

139 00 
51 00 
62 00 

142 00 
64 00 
47 00 

72 00 

73 00 
102 00 

73 00 
71 00 
67 00 
60 00 
64 00 

128 00 
39 00 
37 00 
79 00 

126 00 

149 00 
75 00 

149 00 
41 00 

138 00 
71 00 
51 00 
79 00 
49 00 



Separate 
Schools 



Total 



197 00 



Jo 00 



28 00 



11 
44 



*> c. 

146 00 
75 00 
68 00 
57 00 
73 00 

224 00 

139 00 
51 00 
62 00 

142 00 
64 00 
47 00 

72 00 

73 00 
102 00 

73 00 
71 00 

142 00 
60 00 
64 00 

156 00 
39 00 
37 00 
79 00 

126 00 

149 00 
75 00 

160 00 
85 00 

138 00 
71 00 
51 00 
79 00 
49 00 



$1,159 00 $14,079 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



Ill 



SUMMARY OF APPORTIONMENT FOR 1906, 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
II. 
L2. 
13. 
L4. 
15. 
L6. 
17. 
IS. 
L9. 
20. 
21. 
22 

23! 
24 
25. 
26. 

27. 
28. 
29. 
30. 

31. 
32. 
33. 
34. 

35. 
38. 
37. 
38. 



COUNTIES 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton . . 
Pufferin . . 

Elgin 

Essex. ... 
Frontenac . 
Grey 



Haldimand 
Halburton. . 
Halton 
Hastings.. . . 

Huron 

Kent 



Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peel .....' 



Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington . 

Wentworth 

York 



Total 



39. Districts- 



la) 

(b) 

(c) 

(d) 

(e) 

(f) 

(g 

(h) 



Public 
Schoolf. 



Separate 
Schools. 



$ c. 
1,533 00 
3,670 00 
2,808 00 
1,732 00 
2,897 00 
2,900 00 
2,211 00 
5,353 00 
1,582 00 

693 00 
1,313 00 
3,746 00 
4,498 00 
3,454 00 
3,689 00 
2,071 00 
3,662 00 
1,985 00 
1,593 00 
4,756 00 
2,316 00 
4,460 00 
3,075 00 
3,181 00 
1,712 00 
3,10; 
2,09; 
1,928 00 I 
1,365 00 I 
3,750 00 I 
5,815 00 
5,204 00 
2,150 00 
2,321 00 
1,952 00 
3,302 00 
2,579 00 
4,971 00 



393 00 

485 00 



980 00 
168 00 
116 00 



104 00 
234 00 
207 00 
27 00 
43 00 
24 00 
41 00 



92 00 
55 00 
98 00 
50 00 



00 

(II) 



13 00 
213 00 

20 00 
2,139 00 



Algoma 

Manitoulin j 

Muskoka j Exclusive of the towns! 

Nipissing ! and villages, which ap- [ 



Parry Sound. . . 
Rainy River. . . 
Thunder Bay. . 
Temiscamingue 



pear in the general list J 



Total 



GRAND TOTALS. 



Counties 

Cities 

Towns. . . 

Villages. 

Districts. 



Totals 



111.429 00 



46,000 00 



46.000 00 



•$ c. 
111,429 00 
52,343 00 
36,297 00 
12,920 00 
46,000 00 

258,989 00 



332 00 
128 00 
488 00 
59 00 
285 00 



118 00 
'43*06* 



6,955 00 



2,000 00 



2,000 00 



$ c. 
6,955 00 
13,556 00 
6,534 00 
1,159 00 
2,000 00 

30,204 00 



Total. 



* c. 
1,533 00 
4,063 00 
3,293 00 

1,732 00 
2.897 00 
3,880 00 
2,379 00 
5.469 (M) 
1.582 00 
693 00 
1,313 00 
3,850 00 
4,732 00 
3,001 00 
3,716 00 

2.114 00 
3,086 00 
2,020 00 
1.593 00 
4.848 00 
2.371 00' 
4,55S 00 
3.125 00 
3.1 SI 00 
1,725 00 
3,320 00 

2.115 00 
4,007 00 
1,305 00 
1,082 00 
5,943 00 
5.092 00 
2,209 00 
2,600 00 

1.952 00 
3,420 00 
2,579 00 
5,014 0(1 



118,384 00 



48,000 00 



48,000 00 



$ c. 
118,384 00 
65,899 00 
42,831 00 
14,079 00 
48,000 00 

289,193 00 



112 THE REPORT OF THE • No. 12 

APPORTIONMENT OF THE SPECIAL LEGISLATIVE PUBLIC AND 
SEPARATE SCHOOL GRANT FOR 1906. 



The apportionment of the Special Legislative Grant for Public and Sep- 
arate Schools for 1906 among the townships of the Province is based primar- 
ily upon the population of each as compared with the population of all the 
townships of the Province (not including the territorial districts) according 
to the annual returns from the municipal clerks ; and secondly where there 
are Separate Schools in a township it is divided between the Public and Sep- 
arate Schools according to the average number of pupils attending such 
schools respectively. 

While the Separate Schools will receive their portion of the Special 
Grant (divided among them equally for 1906 in the same way as in the Pub- 
lic Schools), direct from the Department, that of the Public Schools, accord- 
ing to this schedule, is to be divided by the Inspector equally for 1906 among 
all the Public Schools of each township, subject to the following regulation 
of the Education Department in regard to School Sections composed of por- 
tions of different townships in the same or different counties : 

"The apportionment to each school composed of portions of different 
townships in the same or different counties, from the Special Legislative 
Grant to each township concerned, shall, as far as practicable, be that frac- 
tion of the grant to each of the other schools of the township which the aver- 
age attendance from the township at said school is of the total average at- 
tendance at said school ; thus, for example, if the total average attendance is 
24, 8 being the average from one township and 16 from the other, the school 
shall be reckoned as one-third of a school in computing the apportionment in 
the first township, and as two-thirds of a school in computing the apportion- 
ment in the second." 

The Legislative grant apportioned to the Public Schools of each town- 
ship per this schedule is to be paid to the Treasurer of the County in which 
such township is situated on or before the First day of July, as the Lieuten- 
ant-Governor in Council may direct. 

Under the Act of 1906 amending the Public Schools Act, it is compul- 
sory upon the municipal council of every organized county to levy and col- 
lect by an equal rate upon the taxable property of the whole county, per sec- 
tion 39 of the said Amending Act, a sum at least the equivalent of the special 
grant made by the Legislative Assembly to the rural Public and Separate 
Schools of the county. Such county grant shall be payable to the trus- 
tees of the respective schools receiving special legislative grants in the same 
proportions as the said special legislative grants are apportioned. 

Each County Council is therefore required to make provision forthwith 
for at least the equivalent to the special Rural Schools grant by the Legisla- 
ture to the townships of its county as per this schedule and to arrange to pay 
the same upon the certificate of the Public or Separate School Inspector that 
such payments are due as at least the equivalent of the sums apportioned and 
payable by the Education Department. 

May, 1906. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



113 



PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOL SPECIAL APPORTIONMENT 

FOR 1906. 



COUNTY OF BRANT. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Brantford . . 


$ c. 
291 00 
212 00 
142 00 
41 00 
60 00 




$ c. 
291 00 


Burford 




212 00 


Dumfries, South. . 




142 00 


Oakland 




41 00 


Onondaga 




60 00 






Total 


1776 00 




$776 00 









COUNTY OF BRUCE. 



Municipalities. 






Albermarle . 
Amabel .... 

Arran 

Brant 

Bruce. . 

Carrick 

Culross 

Eastnor 

Elderslie 

Greenock. . . 

Huron 

Kincardine. . 

Kinloss 

Lindsay .... 
St. Edmunds 
Saugeen .... 

Total . . . 



Apporti onm ent ;. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 

83 00 

150 00 

128 00 

197 00 

163 00 

142 00 

102 00 

62 00 

108 00 

114 00 

182 00 

155 00 

120 00 

45 00 

29 00 

82 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
83 00 




150 00 




128 00 


7 00 


204 00 
163 00 


118 00 
35 00 


260 00 

137 00 

62 00 




108 00 


37 00 


151 00 

182 00 




155 00 




120 00 





45 00 




29 00 
82 00 






$1,862 00 


$197 00 


$2,059 00 



114 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF CARLETON 



Municipalities. 



Fitzroy , 

Gloucester . . . 
Goulburn .... 
Gower, North 

Huntley 

March 

Marlborough. 

Nepean 

Osgoode 

Torbolton 

Total .... 



Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 

142 00 

231 00 

140 00 

115 00 

120 00 

42 00 

83 00 

260 00 

234 00 

56 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

142 00 


150 00 


381 00 
140 00 
115 00 




120 00 


22 00 


64 00 
83 00 


57 00 
17 00 


317 00 

251 00 

56 00 






$1,423 00 


$246 00 


$1,669 00 



COUNTY OF DUFFERIN. 



Municipalities. 



Amaranth 

Garafraxa, East 
Luther, East. . . 
Melancthon . . . 

Mono 

Mulmur 

Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 
142 00 
110 00 
93 00 
198 00 
168 00 
167 00 



$878 00 



Separate Schools. 



Total. 



$ c. 
142 00 
110 00 
93 00 
198 00 
168 00 
167 00 



$878 00 



COUNTY OF ELGIN. 



Municipalities. 



Aldborough 

Bay ham 

Dorchester, South 

Dunwich 

Malahide \ 

South wold 

Yarmouth 

Total 



Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 
274 00 
223 00 
93 00 
187 00 
212 00 
205 00 
274 00 




$ c. 
274 00 




223 00 




93 on 




187 00 




212 00 




205 00 




271 00 






$1,468 00 




$1,468 00 







8a E. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



115 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools 


Separate Schools. 


Anderdon 


s c. 

88 00 
113 00 
173 00 
112 00 

125 00 

126 00 
55 00 

240 00 
38 00 
54 00 
45 00 

100 00 
71 00 
27 00 

103 00 


$ c. 
26 00 


$ c. 
114 00 


Colchester, North 


113 00 


Colchester, South 

Gosfield, North 




173 00 
112 00 


Gosfield, South 




125 00 


Maidstone 

Maiden 

Mersea 


48 00 
29 00 


174 00 

84 00 

240 00 


Pelee Island 




38 00 


Rochester 

Sandwich, East 


96 00 
121 00 
48 00 
25 00 
96 00 
7 00 


150 00 
166 00 


Sandwich, West 


148 00 


Sandwich, South 

Tilbury, North 

Tilbury, West 


96 00 
123 00 
110 00 


Total 


$1,470 00 


$496 00 


$1,966 00 



COUNTY OF FRONTENAC. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Barrie 


$ c. 
31 00 

82 00 
48 00 
71 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
31 00 


Bedford 




82 00 


Clarendon and Miller 


48 00 


Hinchinbrooke 




71 00 


Howe Island 


20 00 


20 00 


Kennebec 


69 00 

144 00 

92 00 

64 00 

65 00 
57 00 

127 00 

116 00 

106 00 

48 00 

$1,120 00 


69 00 


Kingston 


10 00 

11 00 


154 00 


Loughborough 


103 00 


Olden 


64 00 


Oso 




65 00 


Palmerston and North and South Canonto 




57 00 


Pittsburg 

Portland 




127 00 


10 00 


126 00 


Storrington 


106 00 


Wolfe Island 


34 00 

$85 00 


82 00 


Total 


$1,205 00 







116 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF GREY. 



Municipalities. 



Artemesia. . . . 

Bentinck 

Collingwood . 

Derby 

Egremont . . . 
Euphrasia. . . 

Glenelg 

Holland 

Keppel 

Normanbv. . . 

Osprey 

Proton 

Sarawak 

St. Vincent . . 

Sullivan 

Sydenham. . . 

Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



189 00 
188 00 
202 00 
110 00 
178 00 
167 00 
117 00 
142 00 
212 00 
235 00 
175 00 
197 00 
86 00 
156 00 
170 00 
187 00 

12,711 00 



Separate Schools. 



22 00 
4 00 



17 00 

12 66 



5 00 



$60 00 



Total. 



$ c 
189 00 
188 00 
202 00 
110 00 
178 00 
167 00 
139 00 
146 00 
212 00 
252 00 
175 00 
209 00 

86 00 
156 00 
170 00 
192 00 



$2,771 00 



COUNTY OF HASTINGS. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools 


Separate Schools. 


'Bangor, McClure and Wicklow . . . 


$ c. 

61 00 

40 00 

47 00 

81 00 

46 00 

201 00 

126 00 

101 00 

160 00 

87 00 

33 00 

. 187 00 

228 00 

207 00 

50 00 

31 00 

50 00 

159 00 

$1,898 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
61 00 


Carlow. 




40 00 


Dungannon 

Elzevir and Grimsthorp 

Faradav 




47 00 




81 00 




46 00 


Hungerford 

Huntingdon 


5 00 


206 00 
126 00 


Herschell and Monteagle 

Madoc 


104 00 




1(50 00 


Marmora and Lake . . 


11 00 


98 00 


Mavo . ' 


33 00 






187 00 


Sidnev. . . 




228 00 






207 00 






50 00 






31 00 






50 00 


Tyendinaga 


37 00 


196 00 


Total 


$53 00 


$1,951 00 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



117 



COUNTY OF HALIBURTON. 




Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 




$ c. 
15 00 




$ c. 
15 00 


Cardiff . . 


37 00 

53 00 
30 00 





37 00 


Dudley, Dysart, Harcourt, Harburn and 








53 00 


Glamorgan 

Livingstone 




30 00 








27 00 
3 00 

70 00 
34 00 




27 00 


McClintock 




3 00 


Minden . 




70 00 






34 00 


Nightingale 









13 00 
41 00 

28 00 

$351 00 




13 00 






11 00 


Stanhope 




28 00 






Total 




$351 00 








COUNT1 


I OF H ALTON. 






Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Esquesing 

Nassagaweva . 


$ c. 
200 00 
125 00 
152 00 
188 00 




* c. 

200 00 




125 00 


Nelson 





; 152 00 


Trafalgar 




188 00 








Total . . • ■ 


$665 00 




$665 00 








COUNTY ( 


3F HALDIMAND. 




Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Totals. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Cayuga, North 

Cayuga, South 

Dunn 


$ c. 
52 00 
91 00 
43 00 
48 00 

102 00 
77 00 

104 00 
98 00 
21 00 

165 00 




$ c. 
52 00 




91 00 
43 00 




48 00 


Moulton . 




102 00 


Oneida 




77 00 


Rainham 




104 00 


Seneca 




98 00 


Sherbrooke 

Walpole 




21 00 
165 00 






Total 


$801 00 




$801 00 









118 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF HURON. 



Municipalities. 



Ashfield 

Colborne 

Goderich 

Grey 

Hay 

Howick 

Hullett 

McKillop 

Morrie 

Stanley 

Stephen 

Tuckersmith 

Turnberry 

Ugborne 

Wawanosh, East. 
Wawanosh, West 

Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 

150 00 
101 00 
148 00 
182 00 
173 00 
220 00 

151 00 
120 00 
138 00 
106 00 
207 00 
124 00 
122 00 
127 00 
105 00 
105 00 



$2,279 00 



Separate Schools. 



$ c. 
25 00 



24 00 



9 00 
23 00 



11 00 

18 00 



9 00 
119 00 



Total. 



$ c. 
175 00 
101 00 
148 00 
182 00 
197 00 
220 00 
160 00 
143 00 
138 00 
117 00 
225 00 
124 00 
122 00 
127 00 
105 00 
114 00 



$2,398 00 



COUNTY OF LANARK 



Municipalities. 



Bathurst 

Beckwith 

Burgess, North 

Dalhousie and Sherbrooke, North 

Darling 

Drummond 

Elmsley, North 

Lanark 

Lavant 

Montague. 

Pakenham 

Ramsay 

Sherbrooke, South 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. Separate Schools. 



$ c. 


127 00 


92 00 


21 00 


91 00 


42 00 


114 00 


57 00 


100 00 


29 00 


113 00 


95 00 


122 00 


47 00 



Total 



$1,050 00 



$ c. 

2166 



$21 00 



Total. 



$ c. 

127 00 
92 00 
42 00 
91 00 
42 00 

114 00 
57 00 

100 00 
29 00 

1 13 00 
95 00 

122 00 
47 00 



$1,071 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



119 



COUNTY OF KENT. 



Municipalities. 



Camden 

Chatham .... 

Dover 

Harwich 

Howard 

Orford 

Raleigh 

Romnev 

Tilbury, East 
Zone 

Total . . 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 
145 00 
307 00 
189 00 
250 00 
1(12 00 
130 00 
235 00 
105 00 
161 00 

66 00 



$1,750 00 



Separate Schools. 



$ c. 




64 00 
9 




20 00 


12 00 





$105 00 



Total. 



$ c. 
145 00 
307 00 
253 00 
259 00 
162 00 
130 00 
255 00 
105 00 
173 00 

66 00 



$1,855 00 



COUNTY OF LAMBTON. 



Municipalities. 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



Bosanquet . . 
Brooke .... 

Dawn 

Enniskillen 
Euphemia . 

Moore 

Plympton . 

Sarnia 

Sombra .... 
Warwick . . 



Total 



> c. 
153 00 

185 00 
203 00 
241 00 
114 00 
256 00 
201 00 
122 00 
221 00 
173 00 



$1,869 00 



Separate Schools. 



$ c. 



4 00 



10 00 



$14 00 



Total. 



$ c. 
153 00 

185 00 
203 00 
241 00 
114 00 
260 00 
201 00 
122 00 
231 00 
173 00 



$1,883 00 



COUNTY OF GRENVILLE. 



Municipalities. 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



Augusta : I 

Edwardsburg \ 

Gower, South I 

Oxford, Rideau | 

Wolford 

Total 



$ c. 
210 00 
197 00 

43 00 
152 00 

91 00 



$693 00 



Separate Schools. 



I c. 
6 00 
1 00 



$7 00 



Totals. 



$ c. 
216 00 
198 00 

43 00 
152 00 

91 00 

$700 00 



120 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF LEEDS. 



Municipalities. 



Bastard and Burgess South. 

Crosby, North 

Crosby, Sonth 

Elizabethtown 

Elmsley, South 

Escott, Front 

Kitley 

Leeds & Lansdowne Front . 
Leeds and Lansdowne Rear 
Yonge and Escott, Rear . . . 
Yonge, Front 

Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 

158 00 

57 00 

83 00 

229 00 

42 00 

63 00 

112 00 

144 00 

127 00 

71 00 

76 00 



$1,162 00 



Separate Schools. 



$ c. 



2 00 



4 00 



$6 00 



Total. 



$ c. 


158 00 


59 00 


83 00 


229 00 


42 00 


63 00 


112 00 


144100 


127 00 


75 00 


76 00 


11,168 00 



COUNTY OF LENNOX AND ADDINGTON. 



Municipalities. 



Adolphustown 

Amherst Island 

Anglesea, Effingham and Kaladar 

Camden, East . 

Denbigh, Abinger and Ashley . . . 

Ernestown 

Fredericksburg, North 

Fredericksburg, South 

Richmond 

Sheffield 

Total 



Apportionment. 


Tf tals 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 




$ c. 
34 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
34 00 


48 00 




48 00 


70 00 




70 00 


253 00 




253 00 


59 00 





59 00 


164 00 




164 00 


85 00 




85 00 


54 00 




54 00 


133 00 
106 00 


6 00 
14 00 


139 00 
120 00 


$1,006 00 


$20 00 ' 


$1,026 00 



COUNTY OF LINCOLN. 



Municipalities. 



Caistor 

Clinton 

Gainsborough . . 

Grantham 

Grimsby, North 
Grimsby, South 

Louth 

Niagara 

Total .... 



Apportionment. 


Totals 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 




$ c. 

95 00 

108 00 

124 00 

118 00 

75 00 

78 00 

105 00 

104 00 

$807 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
95 00 




108 00 




124 00 




1 1 8 00 
75 00 




78 00 
105 00 




104 00 








$807 00 








1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



121 



COUNTY' OF MIDDLESEX. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 




$ c. 
109 00 

91 00 
210 00 

88 00 
207 00 
144 00 
148 00 
486 00 
153 00 

85 00 
111 00 
L62 00 
262 00 

70 00 

74 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

109 00 


Biddulph 

Caradoc 


33 00 


124 00 
210 00 

SS 00 






207 00 


Ekfrid 




144 00 






1 18 00 






486 00 


McGrillivray . . 


5 00 


158 00 


Metca) f e 


85 00 






1 11 00 


Nissouri, West 




162 00 




3 00 


265 00 




79 00 


Williams, West 


7 00 


SI 00 






Total 


$2,409 00 


$48 00 


$2,447 00 



COUNTY OF NORFOLK. 



Municipality 



Charlotte vi He 

Houghton 

Middleton 

Townsend 

Walsingham North . 
Walsingham, South 

Windham 

Woodhouse 

Total 



Apportionment. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 
173 00 
113 00 
142 00 
226 00 
118 00 
103 00 
189 00 
110 00 


$ c. 











28 66" 




$1,174 00 


$28 00 



Total. 



$ c. 


173 00 


113 00 


142 00 


226 00 


118 00 


103 00 


217 00 


110 00 


$1,202 00 



COUNTY 


OF DURHAM. 






Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Cartwright 

Cavan 

Clarke 

Darlington 

Hope 

Manvers 


$ c. 

99 00 
135 00 
197 00 
230 00 
177 00 
167 00 


$ c. 


$ c 
99 00 




135 00 




197 00 




230 00 




177 00 




167 00 








Total 


$1,005 00 




$1,005 00 







122 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF NORTHUMBERLAND. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Alnwick 


$ c. 

55 00 
131 00 
139 00 
189 00 
213 00 

53 00 
158 00 
153 00 
166 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

55 00 


Brighton 

Cramahe 


8 00 


139 00 
139 00 


Haldimand 

Hamilton 


24 00 


213 00 
213 00 


Monaghan, South 

Murray 




53 00 




158 00 


Percy 

Seymour 


11 00 
6 00 


164 00 

172 00 






Total 


$1,257 00 


$49 00 


$1,306 00 



COUNTY OF ONTARIO. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


• 
Brock 


$ c. 
203 00 
149 00 
295 00 

76 00 
194 00 
124 00 

27 00 

82 00 
149 00 
154 00 
105 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
203 00 


Mara 

Pickering 

Kama 


26 00 


175 00 

295 00 




76 00 


Reach 




194 00. 


Scott 




124 00 


Scugog Island 

Thorah 




27 00 




82 00 


Uxbridge 

Whitby, East 




149 00 




154 00 


Whitby 




105 00 


Total 


$1,558 00 


$26 00 


$1,584 00 



COUNTY OF PEEL. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Albion 


$ c. 
128 00 
220 00 
219 00 

45 00 
256 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
128 00 


Caledon 




220 00 


Chinguacousy 

Gore of Toronto 




219 00 


7 00 


52 00 


Toronto 


256 00 








Total 


$868 00 


$7 00 


$875 00 






1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



123 



COUNTY OF OXFORD. 



Municipalities. 



Blandford 

Blenheim 

Dereham 

Nissouri, East. . , 
Norwich, North, 
Norwich, South. 
Oxford, North . . 
Oxford, East. . . . 
Oxford, West . . . 

Zorra, East 

Zorra, West .... 



Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 

92 00 
251 00 
203 00 
149 00 
131 00 
114 00 

72 00 
122 00 
122 00 
223 00 
133 00 



$1,612 00 



Separate Schools. 



Total. 



$ c. 

92 00 
251 00 
203 00 
149 00 
131 00 
114 00 

72 00 
122 00 
122 00 
223 00 
133 00 



$1,612 00 



COUNTY OF PERTH. 






Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Blanshard 


$ c. 

HI 00 
140 00 
126 oo 
113 00 
145 00 
211 00 
124 00 
92 00 
169 53 
158 00 
156 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
141 00 


Downie 

Easthope, North 

Easthope, South 

Ellice 


19 00 


159 00 
126 00 




113 00 


34 00 


179 00 


Elma . 


211 00 


Fullarton 




124 00 


Hibbert 


36 00 
2 47 

16 00 


128 00 


Logan 

Mornington 

Wallace 


172 00 
174 00 
156 00 








Total 


$1,575 53 


$107 47 


$1,683 00 



COUNTY OF PRESCOTT. 



Municipalities. 



Alfred 

Caledonia 

Hawkesbury, East 
Hawkesbury,» West 

Longueuil 

Plantaganet, North 
Plantaganet, South 

Total 



Apportionment. 



Public Schools. 



$ c. 

18 00 
53 00 

120 00 
84 00 
31 00 

149 00 
93 00 



$548 00 



Separate Schools. 



$ c. 
175 00 

48 00 
150 00 



35 00 
73 00 

98 00 



$579 00 



Total. 



$ c. 

193 00 
101 00 
270 00 
84 00 
66 00 
222 00 
191 00 

$1,127 00 



124 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF PETERBOROUGH. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


TotaL 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Anstruther 


$ c. 

19 00 

92 00 

101 00 

22 00 

8 00 

44 00 

126 00 

100 00 

48 00 

39 00 

60 00 

13 00 

54 00 

181 00 

155 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 

19 00 


Asphodel 

Belmont 


10 00 


102 00 

101 00 


Burleigh . . . •. 

Cavendish 




22 00 




8 00 


Chandos 




44 00 


Douro 




126 00 


Dummer 




100 00 


Ennismore . 




48 00 


Galway 

Harvey 

Methuen 

Monaghan, North 

Otonabee ... . 




39 00 




60 00 




13 00 
54 00 




181 00 


Smith 




155 00 








Total 


$1,062 00 


$10 00 


$1,072 00 



COUNTY OF RUSSELL. 



Municipalities. 



Cambridge . 
Clarence. . . . 
Cumberland 
Russell 

Total . 



Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 
99 00 
76 00 
182 00 
72 00 


$ c. 
105 00 
239 00 

38 00 
124 00 


$ c. 
204 00 
315 00 
220 00 
196 00 



$429 00 



$506 00 



$935 00 



COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWARD. 



Municipalities. 



Ameliasburg 

Athol 

Hallowell 

Hillier 

Marysburg, North 
Marysburg, South 
Sophiasburg 

Total 



Apportionment, 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


$ c. 

146 00 

60 00 




$ c. 

146 00 

60 00 


173 00 




173 00 


80 00 




80 00 


66 00 




66 00 


69 00 




69 00 


98 00 




98 00 








$692 00 




$692 00 












19(M> 



EDUCATION' DEPARTMENT. 



125 



COUNTY OF RENFREW. 



Apportionment. 



Municipalities. 



Admaston 

Algona, South 

A.lice and Fraser 

Bagot and Blythfleld 

Brougham 

Bromley 

Brudenell and Lyndoch 

Grattan 

GriflSth and Matawatchan 

Hagarty, Jones, Sherwood, Rieha/ds, 

Burns 

Head, Clara and Maria 

Horton 

McNab 

Pembroke 

Petewawa 

Radcliffe 

Raglan 

Rolph, Wylie, McKav, Buchanan 

Ross " : 

Sebastopol 

Stafford 

Weetmeath 

Wilberforce and Algona North 



Public Schools, i Separate Schools. 



Total 



$ c. 

122 00 
50 00 

120 00 
93 00 
31 00 
75 00 
70 00 

112 00 

21 00 

107 00 

22 00 
78 00 

207 00 
50 00 
63 00 
22 00 
40 00 
62 00 

114 00 
39 00 
49 00 

194 1)0 

144 00 



$1,900 00 



$ c. 

7 00 



4 00 
43 00 



18 00 
82 00 



15 00 



$169 00 



Total. 



*$ c. 

129 00 
50 00 

120 00 
93 00 
35 00 

118 00 
79 00 

112 00 
39 00 

189 00 
22 00 
78 00 

207 00 
50 00 

63 00 
22 00 
46 00 
62 00 

1'4 00 
39 00 

64 00 
194 00 
144 00 



$2,069 00 



COUNTY OF SIMCOE. 




126 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF STORMONT. 





Apportionment, 


Total. 


Municipalities. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Cornwall 

Finch 

Osnabruck 


$ c. 
300 00 
191 00 
276 00 
197 00 

$964 00 


$ c. 
53 00 
34 00 


$ c. 
353 00 
225 00 
276 60 


Roxborough 


46 00 


243 00 


Total 


$133 00 


$1,097 00 



COUNTY OF DUNDAS. 





Apportionment, 


Total. 


Municipalities. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Matilda 


$ c. 
190 00 
168 00 
210 00 
194 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
190 00 


Mountain 




168 00 


Williamsburg 

Winchester 




210 00 


7 00 


201 00 






Total 


$762 00 


$7 00 


$769 00 



COUNTY OF GLENGARRY. 





Apportionment. 


Total. 


Municipalities. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Charlottenburg 

Kenyon 


$ c. 
260 00 
227 00 
210 00 
213 00 


$ c. 
26 00 
4 00 
13 00 
65 00 


$ c. 
286 00 
231 00 


Lancaster 

Lochiel 


223 00 

278 00 


Total 


$910 00 


$108 00 


$1,018 00 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



127 



COUNTY OF VICTORIA. 





Apportionment. 


Total. 


Municipalities. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 




$ c. 

48 00 


$ c 


$ c. 
48 00 




43 00 
32 00 




43 00 






32 00 


Eldon 


150 00 
88 00 
121 00 
42 00 
219 00 
129 00 
104 00 




150 00 


Emily 


30 00 


118 00 
121 00 


Laxton, Digby and Longford: 

Mariposa 

Ops ... . 




42 00 




219 00 




129 00 




104 00 




114 00 




114 00 











Total 


$1,090 00 


$30 00 


$1,120 00 



COUNTY OF WATERLOO. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Dumfries, North 


$ c. 
113 00 
362 00 
226 00 
246 00 
229 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
113 00 


Waterloo 

Wellesley 

Wilmot 

Woolwich 


33 00 

68 00 
27 00 
17 00 


395 00 
294 00 
273 00 
246 00 


Total 


$1,176 00 


$145 00 


$1,321 00 



COUNTY OF WELLINGTON. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Arthur 

Eramosa 

Erin 


$ c. 
121 00 
145 00 
178 00 
124 00 
133 00 
115 00 
165 00 
170 00 

96 00 
193 00 

74 00 
162 00 


$ c. 
38 00 


$ c. 
159 00 
145 00 
178 00 


Garafraxa, West 




124 00 


Guelph ... 




133 00 


Luther, West 




115 00 


Maryborough 




165 00 




170 00 


Nichol 

Peel 

Pilkington 

Puslinch 


5 00 
15 00 


101 00 

208 00 

74 00 




162 00 








Total 


$1,676 00 


$58 00 


$1,734 66 



128 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



COUNTY OF WELLAND. 



Munieipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Bertie 


$ c. 
181 00 

59 00 
160 00 
143 00 
114 00 
101 00 
180 00 

53 00 




$ c. 
181 00 


Crowland 




59 00 


Humberstone . . 




160 00 


Pelham 




143 00 


Stamford 




114 00 


Thorold 




101 00 


Wainfleet 




180 00 


Willoughby 




53 00 






Total 


$991 00 




$991 00 









COUNTY OF WENTWORTH. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Public Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


An caster . 


$ c. 

212 00 
215 00 
223 00 

71 00 
139 00 
155 00 

90 00 
203 00 




$ c. 
212 00 


Barton 




215 00 


Beverly 

Binbrook 




223 00 




71 00 


Flamborough, East 

Flamborough, West 

Glanford 




139 00 




155 00 




90 00 


Saltfleet 




203 00 








Total 


$1,308 00 




$1,308 ©0 









COUNTY OF YORK. 



Municipalities. 


Apportionment. 


Total. 


Publie Schools. 


Separate Schools. 


Etobicoke 


$ c. 
253 00 

97 00 
201 00 

89 00 
281 00 
294 00 
211 00 
236 00 
188 00 
670 00 

$2,520 00 


$ c. 


253 00 


( reorgina 




97 00 


( ivvillimbury, J^ast 




201 00 


Gwillimbury, North 




89 00 


King 




281 00 


Markham 




294 00 


Scarboro' 




211 00 


Vau^han 




236 00 


Whitchnrch 




188 00 


York 

Total 


22 00 

$22 00 


692 00 

$2,542 00 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



129 



APPORTIONMENT OF SPECIAL LEGISLATIVE GRANT TO ROMAN CATHOLIC 
RURAL SEPARATE SCHOOLS FOR 1906, PAYABLE THROUGH THIS 
DEPARTMENT. 



School Sections. 
Adjala, No. 10 



Alfred, No. 
" No. 

:t No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 

" No. 
Admaston, 
Anderdon 



3 

6 

7 $7.61, with No. 

7 



8 Plantagenet South, $8.17 



8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
No. 
No. 



2, 5 and 8, $5.66, with No. 6 and 9, Sandwich West, $9.60 



No. 
No. 

Arthur, No. 3 
No. 6 
No. 10 
Ashheld, No. 2 
Asphodel, No. 4 
Augusta, No. 15 
Biddulph, No. 3 



3 and 4 
11, $9.04, 



with Maiden $2.63 



Brant, No. 

" $3.91, with No. 
Brighton, No. 1 (15) . 
Bromley, No. 4 

No. 6 

No. 7 

Brougham, No. 
Burgess North, 



No. 4 

No. 6 

No. 9, $4.71, with No. 1 McGillivray, $5.00 

2, $3.09, with No. 3 Greenock, $19.00 

4 Greenock, $18.00 



Caledonia, No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

Cambridge, No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

1 



1 

No. 2 

No. 4 

No. 6 

3, 4 and 10 

6, $5.33, with No. 
10 

12 

13 

3 

4 



7 Plantagenet South, $8.17 



and 7 



14P 



Carrick, 



No. 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



1, $11.80, with No. 1 Culross, $23.39 
2 

2, $11.80, with No. 2 Culross, $11.61 



Charlottenburg, No. 15 

Clarence, No. 3 

No. 



No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 



5 

6 

8 

11 

12 

13 



Apportionment. 

$15 00 

15 22 

15 22 

15 78 

15 22 

15 22 

15 22 

15 22 

15 22 

15 22 

15 21 

15 21 

15 21 

7 00 
15 26 
11 30 

11 67 

12 66 
12 67 

12 67 

25 00 
10 00 

6 00 
9 43 
9 43 
9 43 

,9 71 

22 09 
21 91 

8 00 
14 34 
14 33 
14 33 

4 00 

7 00 
7 00 
7 00 

10 67 

13 50 
10 67 
10 67 
10 66 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 
17 50 

23 610 
35 19 
23 60 
23 41 
23 60 
23 60 

26 00 
17 08 
17 08 
17 07 
17 07 
17 07 
17 07 
17 07 



9 E. 



130 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



School Sections. Apportionment 

Clarence, No. 14 17 07 

" No. 16 17 07 

" No. 17 17 07 

" No. 18 17 07 

" No. 19 17 07 

No. 20 ~ 17 07 

" No. 21 17 07 

Cornwall, No. 1 17 67 

" No. 16 ; 17 67 

" No. 17 17 66 

Crosby North, No. 7 2 00 

Cumberland, No. 10 9 50 

No. 11 , 9 50 

No. 13 9 50 

No. 14 9 50 

Downie, No. 9 .* 19 00 

Dover, No. 3 2134 

" No. 7 21 33 

" No. 9 21 33 

Edwardsburg, No. 2 1 00 

Ellice, No. 1 11 77 

" No. 6, $10.46, with Logan, $1.88 12 34 

" No. 7 11 77 

Emily, No. 4 15 00 

" No. 6 15 00 

Finch, No. 5 34 00 

Glenelg, No. 5 11 00 

" No. 7 11 00 

Gloucester, No. 1, $8.82, with No. 3 Osgoode, $3.40 12 22 

No. 4, 5, 12 17 65 

No. 14 17 65 

No. 15 17 65 

No. 17 17 65 

No. 20 17 65 

No. 22 17 65 

No. 25 17 64 

No. 26 17 64 

Griffith, etc., No. 3 9 00 

Hagarty, No. 4 27 33 

No. 12 27 33 

Haldimand, No. 2 12 00 

No. 14 12 00 

Harwich, No. 9 9 00 

Hawkesbury East, No. 2 15 00. 

No. 4 15 00 

No. 6 15 00 

No. 7 15 00 

No. 10 15 00 

No. 11 15 00 

No. 12 15 00 

" No. 15 15 00 

No. 16 15 00 

No.«19 15 00 

Hay, No. 1 12 00 

" No. 11 12 00 

Hibbert (1), No. 3 16 43 

" No. 2, $13.60, with McKillop $2.00, and Logan $0.59 16 19 

Howe Island, No. 1 6 67 

No. 2 6 67 

No. 3 6 66 

Holland, etc., No. 3 4 00 

Hullett, No. 2 9 00 

Hungerford, No. 14 5 00 

Kenyon, No. 12 4 00 

Kingston, No. 8 10 00 

Lancaster, No. 14 13 00 

Lochiel, No. 11 21 67 

No. 12A 21 67 

9a F, 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 131 



School Sections. Apportionment 

Lochiel, No. 12B 21 66 

Longueuil West, No. 2 11 67 

" No. 4A 11 67 

No. 7 11 66 

Loughboro, No. 2 5 50 

No. 10 5 50 

Maidstone, No. 1 16 00 

" No. 2 16 00 

No. 4, $8.00, with No. 2. Rochester, $9.54 17 54 

" No. 8, $8.00, with No. 5, Sandwich S., $8.34 16 34 

Maiden, No. 3A 13 19 

11 No. 3B 13 18 

Mara, No. 3 26 00 

March, No. 3 22 00 

Marmora and Lake, No. 1 11 00 

Matawatchan, No. 3 9 00 

Moore, No. 3, 4 and 5 4 00 

Mornington, No. 4 16 00 

McKillop, No. 1 12 84 

" No. 3, $8.16, with Hibbert, $5,97 14 13 

Nepean, No. 7 28 50 

No. 15 28 50 

Nichol, No. 1 5 00 

Normanby, No. 5 8 50 

" No. 10 8 50 

Osgoode, No. 1 •. 6 80 

No. 2 (15) 6 80 

Peel, No. 8 7 50 

" No. 12 : 7 50 

Percy, No. 5 7 33 

" No. 12, $3.67, with No. 12 Seymour, $6,00 9 67 

Plantagenet North, No. 4 14 60 

No. 7 14 60 

No. 8 14 60 

No. 9 14 60 

No. 12 14 60 

Plantagenet South, No. 4 16 34 

No. 7 16 33 

No. 8 16 33 

No. 11 16 33 

No. 12 16 33 

Portland, No. 11 10 00 

Proton, No. 6 12 00 

Raleigh, No. 5 10 00 

No. 6 10 00 

Richmond, No. 10 and 17 6 00 

Rochester, No. 3 19 07 

No. 6 19 07 

No. 7 19 07 

No. 9 and 14 19 07 

Roxboro', No. 12 23 00 

No. 16 23 00 

Russell, No. 1, $9.54, with No. 12 Winchester, $7.00 16 54 

" No. 4 19 08 

" No. 6 19 08 

" No. 7 19 08 

" No. 8 19 08 

" No. 13 '... '. 19 07 

" No. 14 19 07 

Sandwich East, No. 1 : 30 25 

" No. 2 30 25 

No. 3 30 25 

No. 4 30 25 

Sandwich West, No. 1 19 20 

No. 4 19 20 

Sandwich South, No. 7 16 66 

Sheffield, No. 5 14 00 

Sherwood, No. 6 27 34 



132 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



School Sections. Apportionment 

Sombra, No. 5 10 00 

Stafford, No. 2 15 00 

Stephen, No. 6 18 00 

Stanley, No. 1 11 00 

Sydenham, No. 7 5 00 

Tilbury N., No. 1 19 53 

No. 2 19 53 

No. 6 19 53 

No. 7 19 52 

" No. 10, $13.01, with No. 11 Rochester, $6.36 19 37 

No. 11, $4.88, with No. 11 Tilbury West, $7.00 and No. 8 

Rochester, $3.82 15 70 

Tilbury East, No. 1 6 00 

No. 3 6 00 

Tiny, No. 2 50 00 

Toronto Gore, No. 6 7 00 

Tyendinaga. No. 18 7 40 

" No. 20 7 40 

No. 24 7 40 

No. 28 7 40 

No. 30 7 40 

Waterloo, No. 13 33 00 

Wawanosh West, No. 1 9 00 

Wellesley, No. 5 17 00 

No. 9 and 10 17 00 

" No. 11 17 00 

No. 12 17 00 

Westminster, No. 13 3 00 

Williams West, No. 10 7 00 

Wilmot, No. 15* 27 00 

Windham, No. 8 28 00 

Wolfe Island, No. 1 8 50 

No. 2 8 50 

No. 4 8 50 

No. 7 8 50 

Woolwich, No. 10 17 00 

Yonge and Escott R., No. 4 4 00 

York, No. 1 22 00 

Total $3,526 47 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



133 



SUMMARY OF APPORTIONMENT OF SPECIAL LEGISLATIVE GRANT TO RURAL 
PUBLTC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS FOR 1906. 



Counties. 



Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham . . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Peel 

Perth , 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

Total 



Public 
Schools. 



Separate 
Schools. 



1, 



$ c. 

776 00 
862 00 
423 00 
878 00 
468 00 
470 00 
120 00 
711 00 
801 00 
351 00 
665 00 
898 00 
279 00 
750 00 
869 00 
050 00 
855 00 
006 00 
807 00 
409 00 
174 00 
262 00 
558 00 
612 00 
868 00 
575 53 
062 00 
977 00 
692 00 
900 00 
948 00 
636 00 
090 00 
176 00 
991 00 
676 00 
308 00 
520 00 



$56,473 53 



197 00 
246 00 



496 00 
85 00 
60 00 



53 00 
119 00 
105 00 
14 00 
21 00 
13 00 
20 00 



169 00 
65 00 

248 00 
30 00 

145 00 



58 00 



Total. 



48 00 


28 00 


49 00 


26 00 


7 00 


107 47 


10 00 


1,085 00 



22 00 
$3 526 47 



•$ c. 

776 00 

2,059 00 

1,669 00 

878 00 

1,468 00 

1,966 00 

1,205 00 

2,771 00 

801 00 

351 00 

665 00 

1,951 00 

2,398 00 

1,855 00 

1.883 00 

1.071 00 
1,868 00 
1,026 00 

807 00 
2,457 00 
1,202 00 
2,311 00 
1,584 00 
1,612 00 

875 00 
1,683 00 

1.072 00 
2,062 00 

692 00 
2,069 00 
3,013 00 

2.884 00 
1,120 00 
1,321 00 

991 00 
1,734 00 
1,308 00 
2,542 00 

$60,000 00 



Patriotic Programmes for October, November, December, January, 

February, 1906-1907. 

Issued by the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire, with the ap- 
proval of the Minister of Education, for use in schools on the Fridays of 
each month. 

October. 



The Navy of England. 

{t It is on the British Navy under the good providence of God, the Wealth, 

Safety and Strength of the Kingdom chiefly depend." 
What are the Naval Stations and fortifications of the Empire? 



134 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



State date of Battle of Trafalgar, vessels taking part in that engagement and 

their commanders. 
What Colonies contribute to the support of the British Navy? 

Readings. 

Our Navy for a thousand years - - - - - Eardley Wilmot 

English seamen of the sixteenth century - Froude 

The Navy League Journal (copies will be sent by the Order on application.) 
Song - . The Song of the Sea to Victory - Olga Rudd 

November. 
England. 

11 To England under Indian skies, 
To those dark millions of her realm ! 
To Canada whom we love and prize, 
What ever Statesman hold the helm." — Tennyson. 

In what date was St. Paul's Cathedral built? State its style of archi- 
tecture. 
Name celebrations of note that have taken place in this Church. 
What monuments erected to heroes are to be found there ? 
State other matters of interest connected with this celebrated cathedral. 
Name Shakepeare's birth place, its location and description. 
Name four great English poets, four great statesmen. 
Name the cathedrals of England. 

Readings. 

Expansion of England ... - - Sir J. R. Seeley 

The Empire and the Century - Goldman (Editor) 

The Christmas Carol ------ Dickens 

Song - - - - True Born Englishman. 

December. 
West Indies. 

" Or over hills with peaky top engrail'd 
And many a track of palm and rice, 
The Throne of Indian Cama slowly sailed, 
A summer fann'd with spice." — Tennyson. 

How many islands are embraced in the term West Indies? 

Name them and sketch principal incident of history in connection with the 

early days. 
What tends to make these islands a very valuable possession apart from the 

natural products? 
What is the form of Government? 
How many islands comprise the Bahamas and under what protection are the 

islands? 
What is their feeling towards Great Britain? 



11)06 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 135 



Readings. 

The West Indies and the Empire - - - -H.de R.Walker 

At last — A Christmas in the West Indies - Charles Kingsley 

The West Indies and a Spanish Main - Anthony Trollope 

Song - - Stand up for the dear old flag. 

January. 
Gibraltar. 

" Of old sat Freedom on the heights, 
The Thunders breaking at her feet, 
Above her shook the starry lights, 
She heard the torrents meet." — Tennyson. 

The great siege of Gibraltar 1779-1782 illustrating the magnitude of the 
struggle in which England was engaged during the American war. 

Sketch the important battles fought in the neighbourhood of Gibraltar. 

Mention the importance of Gibraltar to the Empire to-day as a position in 
the Mediterranean on the high road to the East. 

What is its importance in the new scheme of Imperial Defence? 

Readings. 

Gibraltar and its sieges - - - - - ... Brassey 

S. Yincent and Trafalgar in " Deeds that won the Empire." 

Song ... . English War Song. 

February. 

British India. 

" Thy prayer was Light — more 
— Light while time shall last! 

Thou sawest a glory growing on the night, 

But not the shadows which that light would cast, 

Till shadows vanish in the Light of Light." — Tennyson. 

What is comprised in British India ? 

The extent of its Territories, its products, its wealth. 

State its Provinces and population. 

What is the religious condition of this vast country ? 

Sketch form of Government. Name most efficient Viceroys. 

Readings. 

India Life and Travel - - - - - A. H. Leowowens 

India, Old and New ------- Hopkins 

Forty years in India - Koberts 

Heroes of the Indian Empire - ----- Foster 

Song - His Majesty the King. 



136 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



CHANGES IN THE DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION AND SCHOOLS 

ACTS. 

Circulars to School Officials anal Municipal Councils. 

Important changes, affecting both the Education Department and the 
Public School system were made during the recent session of the Legisla- 
ture. To some of these changes the Minister desires to direct the special at- 
tention of school officials and municipal councils. 

The Department of Education. 

Under the Act respecting the Department of Education, a Superintend- 
ent of Education has been appointed, and an Advisory Council will be elected 
next November. Subject to the Minister, the Acts, and the Regulations, the 
Superintendent will have the general supervision and direction of all 
branches of the Primary and Secondary School systems; and the Advisory 
Council, besides discharging the examination functions of the present Edu- 
cational Council, will act as a consultative council to the Minister on such 
subjects as he may submit to it for consideration. Notwithstanding these 
provisions, all official correspondence, it should be noted, shall, as hereto- 
fore, be conducted through the Deputy Minister. 

General Improvement of the Public Schools. 

After due consideration of the educational situation, which, from vari- 
ous causes, is 'now a critical one, the Government became convinced that it 
would be necessary, as the first step in the general improvement of the Pub- 
lic Schools, to provide without delay better trained teachers and to secure an 
increase in the salaries of the rural teachers in particular. These conclusions 
were approved of by the Legislature at its recent session ; and, accordingly, a 
first grant was then made for the erection of additional Normal Schools, to 
supersede nearly all the present Model Schools, and a scheme of mimimum 
salaries was adopted, graded according to the section assessment. 

Without a general improvement in salaries, it would be manifestly use- 
less to require candidates for the teaching profession to take, as the scheme 
contemplates, a longer course of professional training. This improvement has, 
indeed, become imperative in view of the greater inducements now offered in 
other callings, and the increasing yearly exodus from the ranks of the On- 
tario teachers. 

Section 39 of the amending Public Schools Act of 1906 amends section 
70 of the Act of 1901. The following are its main provisions, which, owing 
to their importance, are here given in full : 

(1) The municipal council of every organized county shall levy and collect by an 
equal rate upon the taxable property of the whole county (not included in urban muni- 
cipalities or annexed to any urban municipality for school purposes) according to the 
equalized assessments of the municipalities, in the manner provided by this Act and 
The Municipal and Assessment Acts, a sum which shall be at least the equivalent of 
all special grants made by the Legislative Assembly to the rural schools of the county, 
and such sum shall be payable to the trustees of the respective schools receiving such 
legislative special grants in the same proportions as the said special grants are appor- 
tioned. 

(2) Where the assessed value of all the taxable property of the public school sup- 
porters in any township of an organized county is at least equal to an average assess- 
ment of $30,000 for each public school section therein, the municipal council of such 
township shall levy and collect by assessment upon the taxable property of the public 



190G EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 137 



school supporters of the whole township in the manner provided by this Act and The 
Municipal and Assessment Acts, the sum of $300 at least for every public school where 
a teacher or principal teacher is engaged for a whole year exclusive of vacations, and 
a proportionate amount of such sum of $300 at least, where a teacher or principal teacher 
is engaged for six months or longer ; and the additional sum of at least $200 for an 
assistant teacher engaged for a whole year exclusive of vacations, and a proportionate 
amount of such sum of $200 at least, where an assistant teacher is engaged for six 
months or longer. 

(3) Where such assessed value is less than an average assessment of $30,000 for 
each public school section in any township, the municipal council of such township 
shall levy and collect as^ aforesaid the sum of $150 at least for every public school where 
a teacher or principal teacher is engaged for a whole year exclusive of vacations, and 
a proportionate amount of said sum of $150 at least where a teacher or principal teacher 
is engaged for six months or longer ; and an additional sum of at least $100 for every 
assistant teacher engaged for a whole year exclusive of vacations, and a proportionate 
amount of such sum of $100 at least, where such assistant teacher is engaged for six 
months or longer. 

(4) The sums so levied and collected by the council of the township shall, after the 
expiration of the present calendar year, be applied exclusively to teachers' salaries. 

(5) In addition to the sum provided by the township council towards each teacher's 
salary, the trustees of every rural school section shall, in the cases hereinafter men- 
tioned, pay annually, after the expiration of the current calendar year, to the teacher, 
where there is only one, and to the principal teacher where there are more teachers 
than one, at least the sum hereinafter mentioned (subject only to a proportionate re- 
duction in case the whole year's salary does not become due) that is to say : 

(a) $200 where the assessed value of the taxable property of the public school sup- 

porters in the section is at least $200,000 ; 

(b) $150 where such assessed value is at least $150,000 but less than $200,000; 

(c) $100 where such assessed value is at least $100,000, but less than $150,000; 

(d) $50 where such assessed value is at least $50,000, but less than $100,000 ; 

(e) $25 where such assessed value is at least $30,000, but less than $50,000; 
And $100 to every assistant teacher, whatever such assessed value is. 

The said trustees in making their annual estimates and requisitions for school 
moneys to be levied and collected from the ratepayers, shall include whatever amount^ 
considering their other sources of income, is necessary to provide for such payment or 
payments. 

(10) All moneys hereby required to be levied and collected and applied to the sal- 
aries of teachers shall be paid to the treasurers of the respective public school boards 
from time to time as may be required by the school trustees. 

The Public Schools Act of 1901 prescribes that the teacher's salary shall 
be paid quarterly. Unfortunately, it appears, this provision has sometimes 
been overlooked or ignored. The main difficulty in complying with the Act 
has been removed by subsection 10, above ; for the obligation to borrow the 
necessary funds will no longer devolve on the Section School Board. 

At its recent session the Legislature voted the sum of f 60,000 as a spe- 
cial grant to the rural schools of the organized counties. Such special grants 
with the corresponding county grants [see subsection (1) above], and the usual 
general grant (the three grants for the year amounting to over $240,000), 
will, after this year, be distributed, not on the average attendance as hereto- 
fore in the case of the ordinary legislative grant, but "on the basis of the sal- 
aries paid to the teachers, the character of the accommodations, and the value 
of the equipment, after providing a minimum grant for each such school, 
which is equipped as required by the Regulations of the Education Depart- 
ment." [See Act of 1906 respecting the Department of Education, sec. 22, 
subsection (5).] For the distribution of these three grants for the present 
year, section 23 of the Education Department Act of 1906 makes special pro- 
vision, and the apportionment of the general and special legislative grants is 
given in detail in the circulars which have just been issued by the Education 
Department. 

No restriction has been made in the new Acts as regards the application 
of the general, special and county grants, nor for the present year as regards 
the application of the additional township grants. As, however, the new 



138 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



mode of distribution of both the legislative grants as well as the county- 
grants, comes into operation next year, the Minister desires to point out that 
it will be eminently prudent for every School Board to expend its extra in- 
come, during the coming half-year, on the improvement of the school accom- 
modations and equipment. Suggestions and directions as to both of these sub- 
jects will, it is expected, be issued by the Education Department early next 
July. 

As it is most important that the recent changes in the amended Acts and 
the regulations and instructions depending thereon, should be thoroughly 
understood, the Minister directs the Public School Inspector to modify his or- 
dinary routine for the coming half-year so as to have time to discuss the 
changes with at least the chairman of each School Board and with the 
County Council and the Municipal Councils in his inspectorate. 

Continuation Classes. 

In pursuance of the Government's policy to place the Continuation 
Classes on a better financial and educational basis, the sum of $10,000 was 
voted by the Legislature for the scientific equipment and the libraries of 
these classes, making its total grant $32,000. This year's special grant of 
f 10,000 will be distributed by the Education Department amongst the pres- 
ent four grades of schools on the same basis as was the $20,000 grant last 
year for ordinary maintenance; and, in accordance with sec. 8, sub-sec. (6), 
of the Public Schools Act of 1901, county councils are required to provide 
forthwith at least the equivalent of this special grant also. The Minister, it 
should be added, intends to recommend the Legislature to continue to vote 
each year at least the amount of this additional grant, which will, however, 
be applied in future to ordinary maintenance. 

A list of books suitable for Continuation Classes will be found in the 
High School Catalogue of Books for Reference Libraries of, 1902, and especi- 
ally in the Supplementary Catalogue of 1905. Both of these have already 
been distributed amongst the schools. The selection should include suitable 
works of reference in the departments taken up in the school classes. Lists of 
scientific apparatus, suitable for the present courses, will be sent shortly to 
each County Inspector for distribution amongst Continuation Classes. The 
teacher of each school may himself suggest suitable purchases of books and 
apparatus ; but it is most important that no purchases should be made with 
the special grant unless the selections have been thoroughly considered and 
have been approved of by the County Inspector. It will be part of the In- 
spector's duty to see that this special grant and the county equivalent have 
been fully and properly expended by the end of the current year, if he finds 
this to be practicable. But, for the sake of the schools, the equipment should, 
of course, be provided without unnecessary delay. 

In order to bring the Continuation Classes more directly under the con- 
trol of the Education Department, and to raise them to a condition of uni- 
form efficiency, provision was made at the last session of the Legislature for 
the appointment of a special departmental Inspector. As soon as the schools 
re-open, after the coming holidays, this officer will begin his duties, inspect- 
ing all of grades A and B, and as many as may be convenient of grades C and 
D. It is not, however, intended that the Departmental Inspector shall sup- 
ersede the County Inspector, to whose zeal the present number and efficiency 
of the Continuation Classes are largely due. The County Inspector will still 
visit these schools as heretofore ; one of his visits, however, being paid, if pos- 
sible, in company with the Departmental Inspector, who will notify him of 
his intended visit. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 139 



The following statutory amendments of the Public Schools Act affecting 
Continuation Classes also claim the attention of school officials and municipal 
councils : 

Sec. 3 provides for the grouping of any number of Public and Separate 
Schools, not situated in a High School district. Such schools may, accord- 
ingly, be attended and maintained by both Public and Separate School sup- 
porters, as are the present High Schools. 

Sec. 5 provides that, when two or more counties are united for municipal 
purposes, the council may apportion the amount to be levied, so that each 
county shall be liable only for the sums payable in respect of its Continuation 
Classes. Under this provision, one county may give greater aid to its Con- 
tinuation Classes than the others of the union give to theirs. 

Sec. 4 provides that the qualifications of the teachers shall be hereafter 
prescribed by the Regulations of the Education Department. As soon as 
practicable the whole question of the organization and management of these 
schools will be taken into consideration. Until this is settled, the qualifica- 
tions of the teachers shall be those prescribed under the Public Schools Act of 
1901. [See section 8, subsection (5).] 

Other Changes. 

The additional sum of $12,000 was also voted at the recent session of the 
Legislature for Poor Schools and for the general equipment of the Territorial 
(District) Schools, making a total grant for such schools of $77,000. The 
share of the special grant of $12,000 apportioned to the Territorial Schools by 
the Education Department will this year be distributed equally amongst them 
and special consideration will be given to the most needy of the Poor Schools. 

Besides the changes dealt with in this circular, a number of other 
important amendments have been made to the Public Schools Act. Some of 
these deal with the confirmation of school sections (sec. 29), the expropriation 
of land for school purposes (sec. 38), and the remuneration of Public School 
Inspectors and the conditions under which they may be dismissed (sees. 47, 
48, and 49). Copies of the new Act respecting the Education Department and 
the Act amending the Public Schools Act are now being distributed. To 
these, in their entirety, the Minister directs the attention of the school offici- 
als and municipal councils. 

May 28th, 1906. 



ACCOMMODATIONS AND EQUIPMENT OF RURAL PUBLIC AND 

SEPARATE SCHOOLS. 

Approved by the Education Department, July, 1906 
Instructions to Inspectors and School Boards. 

By the Act of 1906, respecting the Department of Education, the basis of 
distribution of Legislative grants to Rural, Public and Separate Schools has 
been changed. (Sec. 23, sub-sees. 5 and 6.) After the present year, the gen- 
eral and special Legislative grants and the county equivalent to the latter 
will be divided on the basis of the salaries paid the teachers, the character of 
the accommodations, and the value of the equipment, after providing a mini- 



140 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



mum grant for each such school which is equipped as required by the Regula- 
tions of the Education Department. The scheme for this distribution will be 
settled by the close of the present year, and will be similar in character to 
that which has proved so effective in the case of the High Schools. (See Reg- 
ulation 149.) It will, accordingly, provide for the payment of a percentage 
of the salary paid the teacher over the minimum prescribed by the recent 
Public Schools Amendment Act, a percentage of the value of the equipment 
over the minimum prescribed herein, and graded sums under each heading of 
the accommodations as detailed herein. 

As a guide to Inspectors and Rural School Boards, the instructions of 
this circular are now issued. In the case of the details prescribed below un- 
der "Accommodations," the Inspector is directed to use his judgment in se- 
curing them, having due regard to the interests of education, the capabilities 
of the present premises, and the financial competency of the boards. These 
details are, however, obligatory in the case of new buildings, and they are 
the basis on which, using his discretion, he shall found his grading. The In- 
spector will grade the accommodations in his report to each School Board 
during the first half of 1907, and will, in that year, distribute on the new 
basis, the Legislative and County grants concerned. In order to do this sat- 
isfactorily, it would be well for him to make for himself a tentative grading 
of the accommodations of each of his schools, during the coming half year, 
on the supposition that there will be three grades under each heading. 

As already pointed out in Circular 15, of May, 1906, it will be eminent- 
ly prudent for every School Board to spend its extra income during the com- 
ing half year on the improvement of the school accommodations and the 
equipment. Before making such improvement, each Board should' consult 
the Inspector, whom, in the same circular, the Minister directs to modify his 
ordinary routine for the coming half-year so as to have time to discuss the 
changes with at least the Chairman of each School Board and with the Coun- 
ty Council and the Township Councils in his inspectorate. For this purpose he 
should also convene meetings of the ratepayers and the school trustees. It is 
not probable that a large number of the schools will be able to secure in the 
first year the highest grading under many of the heads, but an effort should 
be made by each School Board to effect at an early date as many improve- 
ments as its finances will permit. Cases will, no doubt, arise in which School 
Boards will be unable to complete their improvements during the coming 
half-year. In such cases, in grading the accommodations and valuing the 
equipment, it will be at the discretion of the Inspector to recognize improve- 
ments made during the first half of 1907, even after his official visit, if duly 
reported and certified to him by the Principal and the Board of Trustees, on 
a date to be fixed by the Inspector, before the ensuing distribution of the 
grant. In this connection it is important to note that the grant to each 
township is separate from those to the other townships in the County, and, 
accordingly, except in the case of certain union sections, the schools of each 
township will compete for the grant only amongst themselves. It will there- 
fore be prudent for the Inspector to begin with a high standard of grading 
and to maintain the same standard throughout his inspectorate. To both of 
these provisions, it is manifest, he cannot attach too great importance. 

The details under the head of "Minimum Equipment," given below, are 
now obligatory and should be provided as soon as practicable. Until it pro- 
vides this minimum, no school shall share in the Legislative and County 
grants after the present year. When, however, the Inspector is satisfied 
that a Board is too poor to comply with the requirements, he may, at his dis- 
cretion, extend the time till the summer of 1908. 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 141 



Accommodations. 

(1) School Grounds. — As a minimum, the school site shall not be less 
than one acre in area, accessible by good highways and not exposed to dis- 
turbing noises. The school grounds shall be properly levelled and drained, 
and at least 100 yards from stagnant water, and provided with adequate 
walks of plank, brick, flags, gravel, or cement. For the highest grading the 
grounds shall also be ample for school games and for an ornamental plot in 
front. They should also be set out with trees and ornamental shrubs, and en- 
closed by a neat and substantial fence or hedge, with suitable gates (iron pre- 
ferred). Unless so enclosed, the school grounds shall not be rated of the high- 
est grade. In order to ensure good drainage and water supply, the soil 
should, if practicable, be sandy or gravelly, not clayey or peaty. No trees 
shall be placed so close to the school . building as to check the free passage of 
air and light. About one-third of the play-grounds should be allotted to the 
girls, the rest to the boys. 

(2) Closets. — The closets for the sexes shall be under separate roofs and 
placed at least 50 feet from the well and the school building, to- prevent pol- 
lution of the well or the air of the class-rooms. Each closet shall contain a 
sufficient number of compartments properly lighted and ventilated, and, for 
the highest grading, each compartment shall be provided with a door. 
The boys' closet shall be built of glazed brick or similar material, or of wood, 
painted a dark color and sanded, with a floor of tiles or glazed bricks. Uri- 
nals of slate or else lined with zinc or galvanized-iron, shall be provided for 
the boys. For the highest grading in schools with more than one teacher, 
there shall be locked compartments for the teachers. Suitable covered walks 
(cement, flag, or brick preferred) shall be laid from the doors of the school 
building to the closets, so that the closets shall be accessible with comfort at 
all seasons of the year, and provision shall be made for keeping the walks 
free from snow in the winter. A close board fence or a wall, about six feet 
high, shall be provided between the boys' and the girls' side, from the closet 
to the school building ; and the closets shall be placed at least ten feet distant 
on each side. The entrance to the closets shall be properly screened (spruce 
trees in front of each closet) and the doors shall be locked after school hours by 
the teacher, and opened before school hours by the caretaker. The closets 
and urinals shall be cleansed and disinfected monthly if possible. Dry earth 
closets or closets with draw-boxes are to be preferred. 

(3) Water Supply. — The water supply shall be adequate. There should 
be a well, (artesian if at all practicable) with a neat pump and platform, of 
good drinking water, on the school premises, properly protected against pol- 
lution from surface drainage or any other source. If a dug well it shall be 
thoroughly pumped and cleaned out at the close of each vacation and at such 
other times as may be deemed advisable by the teacher or by the inspector. 
Graniteware pails, or, for the highest grading, earthenware or graniteware 
water-tanks with covers, and drinking cups of glass or good enamelled ware 
shall be provided and kept scrupulously clean. Where there is no well, 
other provision, satisfactory to the inspector, shall be made for an adequate 
supply of good water. 

(4) School Building. — The grading of the school building shall depend 
upon the character of its site and its construction. The building should have 
a southern exposure and shall be at least thirty feet distant from the public 
highway. Its architectural appearance shall be considered, and, for the 
highest grading, more than merely a plain building shall be required. The 
ep+vance shall have a vestibule or covered porch. In schools with more than 



142 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



one teacher, for the highest grading, there shall be separate entrances, and 
separate means of egress to the closets at the rear. Where there are two stor- 
ies, the second floor shall be sound-proofed with mortar, felt, or other suitable 
material. A school bell (and, in the larger schools, a fire alarm gong) shall 
be provided, and a flag and flag-pole. Every school should have a basement, 
at least seven feet high in the clear, ceiled with wood or plaster, and hav- 
ing a pine, hardwood, or (preferably) cement floor. Cordwood shall be well 
dried before being stored in the basement. Where there is no basement, an 
adequate woodshed shall be provided, at least 20 feet from the building, of 
wood, brick, or other suitable material, with proper doors and locks. The 
wood-work of the shed shall be painted a suitable color. 

(5) Class Rooms. — The class rooms shall be oblong (length 7 feet more 
than breadth), and large enough to seat comfortably all the pupils. A sup- 
erficial floor area of at least 12 (16 preferred) square feet, and a cubic air space 
of not less than 250 feet shall be allowed for each pupil, tne provision being 
based on the highest attendance. Hardwood should be preferred for all the 
woodwork, especially for the floors. Except for the floors any material of 
such quality and grain as would suit for an oil or varnish finish will suit. 
Suitable color schemes (the ceilings being always white or slightly tinted) 
should be adopted for the hajls and class rooms, which should be painted 
rather than calcimined. Wood finish, instead of plaster, may also receive 
the highest grading. If calcimined, the walls must be kept free from dust, 
and recalcimined when needed. If painted they must be washed down and 
repainted also when needed.* 

Adjustable transoms shall be placed over the class room doors which 
shall swing outwards either way. At least one waste paper basket shall be 
provided and the floors shall be kept in good order. A closet or a cabinet 
shall be provided for utensils used in school work ; also a map case and shelv- 
ing for lunch baskets or lunch pails. As soon as practicable, the class rooms 
should be decorated with good pictures, casts, vases, and other ornaments. 
Suitable scrapers and mats shall be placed at the outside doors. In localities 
where flies are troublesome wire screens should be provided for the doors and 
windows. 

(6) Teachers' Private Rooms. — There should be a room for the private 
use of the teacher or the staff, of suitable size and comfortably furnished. 

(7) Halls. — The entrances, vestibules and halls shall be roomy and well 
lighted and shall be so placed as to admit of separate entrances for the sexes 
to the cap and class rooms. The entrance and vestibule doors shall swing out- 
wards or either way. For the highest grading, in buildings of two stories, 
there shall be separate stairways for the sexes, easy of access and well guard- 
ed. Here, also, suitable color schemes and decorations should be provided. 

(8) Cap Rooms. — For the highest grading, and in all schools to be erect- 
ed hereafter, separate cap rooms shall be provided for the sexes. The cap 
rooms shall be conveniently situated with respect to the class rooms and shall 
be provided with wash basins and towels and with all the necessary appli- 
ances for storing umbrellas and for hanging caps or cloaks. Where there are 
no cap rooms, there shall be an adequate supply in the class room, of hooks, 
for caps, cloaks, etc. Curtains should be strung on wires to conceal the 
clothing. 

(9) Desks. — Every school house shall be seated with either double or 
singe desks with movable seats and noiseless joints, such single desks being 
necessary for the highest grading. The desks shall be fastened to the floor in 

inspectors and School Boards should consult "School Sanitation and Decoration," 
by Burrage and Bailey; $1.50; D. C. Heath & Co., New York City 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 143 



rows facing the teacher's platform, with suitable aisles between the rows and 
with passages at least three feet wide between the outside rows and the walls 
of the school room. The desks and seats shall be graded in size to suit the 
age of the pupils, those of the same size being placed in the same row from 
front to rear. The pupil when seated, must be able to place his feet fully 
and easily on the floor. The number of the desks shall be adequate for the 
number on the roll. 

There shall be a suitabe desk and chair in each class room for the use of 
the teacher, and at least two chairs for visitors. The teacher's desk shall be 
provided with two drawers or compartments, with lock and key. There shall 
be a table of suitable size, around which the younger pupils may assemble to 
do part of cheir work. Where Chemistry or Physics is taken up in a higher 
class, a suitable table should be provided for the experiments ; and, in such 
schools, this provision shall be necessary for the highest grading. A sloping 
stand for the large dictionary shall also be provided. 

(10) Blackboards . — There shall be one blackboard of good quality, at 
least four feet wide, extending across the room in the rear of the teacher's 
desk, with its lower edge not more than two and one-half feet above the floor ; 
and there shall be additional blackboard provision on each of the other sides 
of the room. Slate is greatly to be preferred and is cheaper in the end ; hylo- 
plate will do. There shall also be an adequate supply of blackboard brushes 
and crayons, the former to hang below the trough. Where there is a plat- 
form it shall be from four to five inches high and should extend across the 
room where practicable. At the lower edge of each blackboard there 
shall be a trough, covered with wire netting, five inches wide, for hold- 
ing crayons and brushes. The troughs and brushes shall be cleaned every 
day.* 

(11) Lighting. — For the highest grading, the class rooms shall be light- 
ed from the left of the pupils, tne lower edges of the windows being on a level 
with the tops of their heads. Where there are windows in front of the pupils, 
it is indispensable that they shall be closed up. To admit of an adequate 
diffusion of light throughout the whole class room, the windows shall be num- 
erous (area, one-fifth or one-sixth of the floor space, where the lighting is 
good; otherwise a greater area), and of clear (not ground or painted) glass; 
narrow, with two or four panes each ; and running as close to the ceiling and 
as far to the rear of the class rooms as practicable. They shall begin about 
five or six feet from the "front of the class room. The windows shall also be 
provided with blinds of suitable color and size. The blinds on the left of the 
pupils should be semi-transparent ; other blinds should be opaque. On dull 
days, windows in the rear and on the right may be serviceable ; but, if the 
light from the left is adequate, they should not be used at other times. 

*The following directions for making a blackboard may be found useful. (Such 
blackboards, however, are never satisfactory): 

(a) Where a brick wall is built solid, and also in case of frame buildings, the part 
tc be used for a blackboard should be lined with boards, and the laths for holding the 
plaster nailed firmly on the boards. 

(b) The plaster for the blackboard should be composed largely of plaster of Paris. 

(c) Before and after having received the first coat of color it should be thoroughly 
polished with fine sand paper. 

(d) The coloring matter should be laid on with a wide, flat varnish brush. 

(e) The liquid coloring should be made as follows: — Dissolve gum shellac in alcohol, 
four ounces to the quart; the alcohol should be ninety-five per cent, strong; the dis- 
solving process will require at least twelve hours. Fine emerv flour with enough chrome 
green or lampblack to give color, should then be added until the mixture has the con- 
sistency of thin paint. It may then be applied in long, even strokes, up and down, 
the liquid being kept constantly stirred. 



144 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(12) Heating. — The temperature of the class rooms, halls, cap rooms, 
and teachers' private rooms shall be, as nearly as practicable, 68 degrees. A 
thermometer shall be provided for each class room. For first-class grading, 
steam radiators or hot air furnaces are necessary. Where stoves are used, 
they shall be so placed as to prevent discomfort to any pupil ; shall be 
protected by a jacket of tin, zinc, or galvanized iron; and shall be provided 
with a strong iron poker, shovel, and pail for ashes. The stove-pipes and the 
chimneys shall be kept free from soot and dust. Both stoves and stove-pipes 
shall be polished at least three times a year. 

(13) Ventilation. — Provision shall be made for an adequate supply of 
pure air at all times. The foul air shall be removed and the pure air sup- 
plied so that there shall be a complete change at least three times an hour. 
The windows of every school building shall be adjusted by weights and pull- 
eys, and, when the outside temperature permits it, they will provide the nec- 
essary change of air. In cold weather the windows may be raised at recess 
from below and lowered from above, according to the outside temperature ; 
but the necessary constant ventilation cannot be secured by this method. The 
pure air shall be admitted directly from the outside through sufficient ducts 
running under the floor and opening below the stove. The pure air supply 
shall be under control by slides to open or close the ducts. Where steam heat- 
ing or a hot air furnace is used, the pure air shall be admitted directly from 
the outside, at a height of about four feet from the ground, to the base of the 
furnace. In the air space of each furnace or within the jacket of each stove 
there shall be a pan filled daily with water, so as to furnish the warmed air 
with the necessary moisture. (Air shall not be taken from the school room or 
from the basement to supply the furnace, except in the morning before school, 
after which, this source of supply must be shut off.) 

In all cases the foul air shall be taken away from near the floor and out 
through ventilating ducts in the chimney, which ducts should be some- 
what larger in area than the incurrent pure air ducts. In buildings where 
ventilating ducts have not been provided in the chimneys, two tin, zinc, or 
galvanized iron pipes (about six inches by ten inches) should extend on oppo- 
site sides from near the floor, connecting below with the class room and run- 
ning up through the ceiling beside the chimney, and so placed as to to be well 
heated. Openings, with regulating slides, should also be provided in these 
ducts near the ceiling for use only when the room is overheated. When 
needed, a cowl should be placed so as to cover properly the chimney and the 
excurrent foul air ducts. 

Where storm sashes are used on the outside, they shall contain sliding 
panels in the wood or the panes or shall be hinged at the top to allow the in- 
gress of pure air ; or they may be placed on the inside and also hinged at the 
top. It answers equally well to have double panes of glass about one-half 
inch apart in the same sash. 

Reg. 9 (Amended). — The trustees shall appoint one of themselves or 
some other suitable person to keep the school house and premises and a]l 
fences, water-closets, outhouses, walks, windows, desks, maps, blackboards, 
and stoves in proper condition. It shall be the duty of the teacher to inspect 
the premises daily and report to such officer without delay any needed re- 
pairs. The trustees shall also provide for washing the floors at least quarter- 
ly (monthly to be greatly preferred) and for whitewashing, every year during 
the summer holidays, the walls and ceilings if finished in plaster, or for 
washing them if finished in wood or steel sheeting and painted ; and shall em- 
ploy a caretaker whose duty it shall be to sweep the floors daily (the windows 
being then open), to dust daily all the furniture, window ledges, etc., with 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 145 



damp dusters (preferably in the morning at least an hour before school); to 
make fires, at least one hour before the opening of school, from the first of 
November until the first day of May in each year, and at such other times in 
October and May as the teacher may direct. The duties of the caretaker shall 
be arranged for and performed satisfactorily to the Inspector. 

Reg. 10. — No Public School house or school grounds, unless otherwise 
provided for in the conveyance to the trustees, shall be used for any other 
than school purposes without the consent of the trustees, and no advertise- 
ments shall be posted in any school room or distributed to the pupils unless 
approved in the same way. 

Reg. 10 (a). — Hereafter, subject, to appeal to the Minister of Education, 
all new school sites and all additions to old ones and all plans of new schools 
or of additions to old ones, and all other proposed school accommodations, 
shall be approved by the Inspector of Public or Separate Schools (as the case 
may be), who shall be guided by the instructions contained herein. (New 
Regulation.) 

Minimum Equipment. 

Reg. 8 (Amended). — A globe, not less than nine inches in diameter and 
properly mounted ; a map of the hemispheres ; a map of each continent ; a 
map of Canada ; a map of Ontario ; a map of the county (if a suitable one is 
published) ; a map of the British Empire ; a map of the British Isles ; an atlas 
or a gazetteer ; a standard dictionary for each class room (with English pro- 
nunciation) ; a numeral frame (or an adequate supply of loose cubes) ; a good 
clock for each class room, kept in good condition ; a set of mensuration surface 
forms and geometrical solids ; a blackboard set for each class room (one pro- 
tractor, 15£ inches, triangle, 24 inches, a pair of compasses, two pointers, a 
graduated straight edge) ; a pair of scales, with weights, to weigh from half- 
ounce to ten pounds ; a set for measure of capacity (pint, quart, gallon) ; a set 
for linear measure (inch, foot, yard, tape line) ; a set for square and cubic 
measures ; a school library of the minimum value of f 20.00 for each teacher 
employed, increased annually after December, 1907, by at least $10.00 until 
the value for each teacher employed reaches $ 100.00. A suitable book case 
shall also be provided. 

For a list of books, see Catalogue of Books for Public School Libraries, 
issued by the Education Department in 1902. In making the selection, the 
Inspector's approval should invariably be secured. He is directed 
to strike off the list any unsuitable purchases. Regs. 117, 118, 121, and 
122 are hereby cancelled. 

Additional Equipment. 

Besides the above equipment, which is obligatory in every rural Public 
and Separate School, the Education Department has issued three other circu- 
lars : No. 6a. (a list of scientific apparatus suitable for Fifth Form and ele- 
mentary Continuation Classes) ; No. 6. (a list of scientific apparatus suitable 
for advanced Continuation Classes), and No. 66. (a list of equipment for Do- 
mestic Science, Construction Work, and School Gardens, in rural schools). 
From these lists Boards should select, with the approval of the Inspector, such 
apparatus as may be needed for the work done in the several departments. 
These lists have been distributed along with this circular, but additional ones 
may be obtained upon application to the Inspector. 

A book in which to record from time to time the value of the equipment 
will be provided by the Education Department for each rural school before 
next August. 

10 E. 



146 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Summer Schools for Teachers, 1906. 

The Education Department has made arrangements for Summer Schools 
to be held at the Normal College, Hamilton, and at the Normal Schools, 
Toronto, Ottawa and London. The main purpose of the Schools is to give 
instruction in the following Departments : — 

Manual Training. 

Household Science. 

Nature Study. 

Art. 
Classes will be organized so as to enable students (the preference being 
given to teachers) to take as many as convenient of these departments. In- 
struction will be given by Specialists in the respective subjects. Any further 
information required will be obtained by students after the classes are organ- 
ized. No fees will be required, and it may be presumed that the cost of 
books, etc., will be slight. The Schools will be organized at 2 p.m., Tues- 
day, July 3rd, when all necessary information will be given. The session 
will continue for three weeks. Certificates of attendance will be awarded 
to those students who show satisfactory proficiency. 

Persons who desire to avail themselves of the privileges offered, should 
make application at an early date not to this Department but to the Principal 
of the Institution they purpose attending. No special form of application 
will be needed. (A Summer School is also announced at the McDonald In- 
stitute, Guelph, for which information may be obtained from the President.) 

May, 1906. 



APPARATUS FOE PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

Physics. 

High S\chool y Middle School and Advanced Public School 
Continuation Classes. 

The Pieces Marked with an Asterisk Should Form Part of Individual Sets 

for Students* Use. 

Sound. 

Probable Cost, 
1 Brass Rod for showing the production of Sound 

by longitudinal vibrations of rods 

1 Whistle 

*1 Coil Spring, about 1 inch in diameter and 2 feet 

long See List of 

1 Bell in Vacuo I Apparatus 

1 Whirling Machine [for Lower 

Cardboard Discs for Whirling Machine to Show School. 

Reflection of Sound a 

1 Toothed Wheel with ring of holes to attach to 

Whirling Machine to illustrate Pitch of Sound. 

1 Toy Trumpet 

1 Clamp for Vibrating Plates $1 00 

2 Brass Plates, one square, one circular 2 00 

10a E. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



147 



Probable Cost. 
1 Sonometer |5 00—10 00 

1 Violin Bow 75 

•1 Tuning Fork-A 25 

2 Tuning Forks-C, mounted on Resonance Boxes 8 00 

1 Small Chain 15 

1 Wave Machine 5 00 

1 Jointed Tin Tube, 3 metres long, 10 cm. in diameter, with one 

end tapered to a diameter of 2.5 cm 

2 Large Concave Mirrors for Reflection of Sound 2 50 

1 Large Toy Balloon for showing Refraction of Sound 

1 Interference Apparatus 5 00 

1 Siren (optional) $6 75—30 00 

* Glass Tubes of various sizes and lengths for showing Vibrations 

of Air Columns 1 50 

1 Organ Pipe with Glass Front 2 50 

1 Tambourine to use with the above 50 

1 Manometric Flame Apparatus 10 00 

Heat. 

See List of Apparatus for Lower School. 

Light. 

*1 Cardboard Screen with frame "\ 

1 Reflection of Light Apparatus, to be fitted also See List of 

for Reflection of Sound I Apparatus 

*1 Plane Mirror (small) for Lower 

1 Plane Rectangular Glass Tank, to be used also as School. 
Pneumatic Trough , 

1 Port Lumiere flO 00—25 00 

or Projection Lantern ..|25 00—100 00 

1 Optical Bench and Photometer, complete with Concave and Con- 
vex Mirrors and Set of Demonstration Lenses |7 50—20 00 

1 Refraction Tank , 3 50 

1 Rotating Mirror, mounted on stand 4 00 

2 60° Glass Prisms 2 00 

1 Focusing Lens, large, mounted on stand 3 00 

1 Colour Wheel for re-Composition of Light 1 50 



Electricity and Magnetism. 

*2 Bar Magnets 

*1 Horse Shoe Magnet 

1 Compass 

*1 Bar Soft Iron (round, 6 inches long) See List of 

*1 Sheet Zinc and Sheet Copper (Pair Elements) Apparatus 

*1 Galvanoscope, complete f * or Lower 

4 Dry Cells School. 

1 Spool Double Covered Magnet Wire, No. 20, to be 
used for making Electro-Magnets, etc 

1 Small Incandescent Lamp (3 volts) '.. 

1 Dipping Needle $ 2 50 

1 Electric Bell 1 00 



148 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Probable Cost. 

1 Astatic Pair of Magnetic Needles SO 50 

Strips of Zinc, Copper, Carbon, Iron, Lead and Platinum to be 

used in constructing the various forms of cells 

1 Water Voltameter 2 00 

1 'Copper Voltameter 2 00 

1 TJ-Shaped Tube on stand 1 00 

2 Coils with Mercury Commutator, for showing Laws of Currents 

complete 

1 Set of Telegraph Instruments 5 00 

1 Astatic or D'Arsonval Galvanometer 10 00 

1 Tangent Galvanometer $3 50—10 00 

1 Apparatus for showing the Laws of Current Induction and Illus- 
trating the Action of the Dynamo and the Motor 25 00 

1 Arc Lamp, Simple Regulator 5 00 

1 Wheatstone Bridge 25 00 

Instead of the above a Metre Sliding Bridge may be used.... f 5 00 — 15 00 

Mechanics and Hydrostatics. 

High School, Upper School and Advanced Public School 
Continuation Classes. 

1 Apparatus to Determine Acceleration Due to Gravity $ 5 00 

1 Set of Apparatus to Illustrate Forces Acting at a Point — Parallelo- 
gram of Forces, Triangle of Forces, Polygon of Forces, etc., 
complete 20 00 

1 Set of Apparatus to Illustrate Parallel Forces and Moments in- 
cluding Levers and different forms of Balance, etc., complete.. 10 00 

1 Set of Apparatus to illustrate Centre of Gravity and Equilibrium 

of a Body 5 00 

1 Set of Apparatus to Illustrate Laws of Friction 5 00 

1 Apparatus for Demonstrating Laws of Fluid 
Pressure 

1 Whole Pressure Apparatus 

1 TJ-Shaped Tube, Large 

1 Barometer, Graduated and Filled 

1 Air Pump. See List of Apparatus, Part 1 

1 Lift Pump, Glass Model 

1 Force Pump, Glass Model 

1 Hydraulic Press, Glass Model 



See List of 
Apparatus 
for Lower 
School. 



Chemistry. 

High School, Middle School and Advanced Classes in the Public School 

Continuation Classes. 

The items marked with an asterisk are indispensable. When there are 
two asterisks, at least one of the articles should be provided. 

Apparatus. 

Probable Cost. 

*1 Blast Lamp, with Blower, where gas is available $8 00 to flO 00 

or, for kerosene or gasolene 5 00 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 149 



Probable Cost. 

*2 Bunsen Burners, if gas is used each $0 50 to $0 75 

or, 2 alcohol lamps, 4 oz. copper each 40 

1 Blowpipe (mouth) each 25 to 1 00 

*i doz. Test tubes, 8 in. x 1 in 60 per doz. 

1 doz. Test tubes, 5 in. x j in 25 

*1 doz. Test tubes, 4 in. x J in 15 

**2 U Tubes, 6 in. x i in each 10 

3 Beakers, 2 oz each 10 

*3 Beakers, 4 oz each 20 

3 Beakers, 8 oz each 30 

*1 lb. glass tubing, soft J in. to J in 60 

1 lb. glass tubing, hard J in. dia 1 00 

* or 1 doz. combustion tubes 8 in. x \ in., hard 60 

2 Tubes 18 in. x \ in. closed at one end each 10 

2 Gas jars 18 in. x 2J in each 85 to 1 00 

*3 Flasks, 250 cc, necks f in. diam each 20 

**3 Flasks, 500 cc, necks 1 in. diam each 25 

3 Funnel (Thistle) tubes, 10 in each 10 

**3 Funnels, 3 in each 15 

1 Tube 2 in. x 18 in., open each 15 

*1 Eudiometer, graduated to l-5cc, 50cc, 2 00 

*1 Burette, graduated to l-5cc, 50cc, 1 00 

*1 Retort, stoppered, 4 oz 25 

1 Retort, stoppered, 8 oz 35 

2 Pipettes, 1 curved 15 

•1 Measuring Glass, graduated to cc, lOOcc 75 

1 Thermometer, chemical 50 to 1 00 

*1 Lamp Chimney, large 10 

**2 doz. bottles, stoppered, narrow, 2 oz 1 00 per doz. 

1 doz. bottles, stoppered, wide, 2 oz 1 00 " 

(3 doz. bottles, cork, narrow 30 " 

1 doz. bottles, cork, wide, 4 oz 30 " 

*i doz. Pickle bottles, or pt. Preserve Jars 30 

*1 Electrolytic Apparatus (See list of Physical Apparatus) 

3 Winchesters, J gal bottles for gas storage each 25 

*3 Rubber stoppers, 2 holes, J in. small end each 10 

3 Rubber stoppers, 1 hole, § in. small end each 08 

*2 yds. Rubber Tubing, 3-16 in. inside, red 10 per ft. 

2 yds. Rubber Tubing, J inside, red 12 " 

**2 Pinch cocks, medium each 20 

*1 Set cork borers, J in. — J in 

1 Piece Platinum wire No. 32, 1 ft 80 

*4 Dry cells each 30 

*10 ft. silk covered copper wire, No. 24 15 

*tl Induction coil, small (See list of Physical Apparatus) 

*1 sq. ft. wire gauze, brass, fine 50 

* Pieces mica # 10 

Pieces stove pipe iron 

*1 Retort stand, 3 rings 1 25 

•1 Clamp stand 1 50 

* Blocks for stands 

1 Balance to weigh with set weights 12 00 to 20 00 

t A Friction Electric Machine may be used with the Eudiometer instead of cells and coils. 



150 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Probable Cost. 

*1 Package picture, jwire $0 10 

*1 Copper retort for oxygen 2 50 

3 Test tube brushes each 10 

1 Spool soft iron wire 10 

1 Mortar and pestle, 4 in 50 

1 Pair iron forceps (tongs), 6 in 50 

1 Pair pliers, wire cutting 60 

♦2 Files, one round, one triangular each 15 

*4 Soup plates 20 

*2 doz. corks, assorted. 10 

*1 Package filtering paper, circles, 6 in 25 

♦J doz. sheets Litmus paper 30 

* Candles 10 

Chemicals. 

♦Zinc, granulated, 1 lb 20 

Lead clippings (sheet) 20 

♦Copper Clippings (sheet or wire), 1 lb 50 

*Iron filings, lib 05 

Antimony, metal, 1 oz 15 

♦Magnesium, wire or ribbon, J oz 40 

♦Charcoal 25 

Coal, pieces of hard and soft 

♦Mercury, 1 lb 1 00 

♦Sodium, 1 oz 25 

^Potassium, 2 drams or 1 oz 25 dr. , 1 .50 oi 

Litharge, 2 ozs 05 oz. 

♦Red Lead, J lb 40 per lb. 

♦Oxide of Mercury, red, 1 oz. .'. 25 

♦Oxide of Copper, 1 oz 15 oz. 

♦Ferric Oxide (iron rust, dried) 

♦Manganese Dioxide, J lb ...\ 10 

♦Barium Dioxide, 2 ozs 10 oz. 

Calcium Oxide, (lime, lumps) 

Arsenious Oxide, 2 ozs 15 oz. 

♦Sodium Hydroxide, 4 ozs., 1 lb. in bottle 75,0 25 

Phosphorus, yellow, 2 ozs 

Phosphorus, red, 1 oz 

Potassium Hydroxide, 1 lb. in bottle 75 

♦Potassium Iodide, 1 oz 30 

Potassium Chlorate, 1 lb 25 

Potassium Chloride, 1 lb 40 

Potassium Nitrate, £ lb 40,0 20 

Potassium Sulphate, \ lb 50 per lb. 

Potassium Bichromate, 2 ozs 10 oz. 

Potassium Ferrocyanide, 2 ozs 10 oz. 

Potassium Permanganate, 2 ozs * 15 

♦Sodium Nitrate, 1 lb 40 

♦Sodium Chloride, 1 lb 05 

Barium Chloride, \ lb 20 

Barium Nitrate, \ lb 20 

♦Calcium Chloride, lumps 

♦Iron Sulphate, 1 lb 30 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 151 



Probable Cost . 

•Iron Sulphide, 1 lb SO 15 

Mercuric Chloride, 1 oz 25 

•Ammonia Solution, 1 qt 30 

•Ammonium Nitrate, 1 lb 30 

•Ammonium Chloride, J lb 30 

•Ammonium Carbonate, \ lb 30 

•Silver Nitrate, 1 oz 80 

♦Copper Sulphate, 1 lb 10 

•Calcium Carbonate, lumps of limestone, calcite, chalk, 

animal shells 

•Carbon, specimens of coal, charcoal, graphite, lampblack, 

animal black, soot, \ oz. each 30 

Magnesium Sulphate 1 lb 10 

Magnesium Oxide, 2 ozs 25 

Litmus, 1 oz., lumps ~. 15 

Turmeric, 1 oz., powder 10 

•Iodine, 1 oz 50 

•Starch, 2 ozs 05 

♦Indigo, l'oz 25 

•Logwood, extract, 1 oz 10 

Aniline Violet (magenta), 1 dram 15 

Carbolic Acid, 2 ozs 10 

•Turpentine, 4 ozs 10 

Benzene, 4 ozs 10 

Gasolene, 4 ozs '. 10 

•Paraffin (white wax), 1 lb 15 

•Sulphur, powder, 1 lb 10 

•Sulphuric Acid, 10 lbs 05 per lb. 

•Nitric Acid, 2 lbs 05 " 

•Hydrochloric Acid, 2 lbs 05 " 

•Oxalic Acid, 1 lb 40 

•Pumice Stone, lumps, \ lb 10 

•Sodium Carbonate, 1 lb 05 

Plaster of Paris 10 

Upper School, High School and Advanced Public School 
Continuation Classes. 

Apparatus. 

\ doz. hard glass test-tubes, 8x1 inch. 

1 doz. hard glass test-tubes, 5 x | inches. 

1 doz. hard glass test-tubes, 4xJ inches. 

3 Porcelain crucibles with covers. 

3 Evaporating dishes, glazed, 2-3 inches. 

3 Beakers, glass, \ litre. 

3 Flasks, 1 litre, with two holed rubber stoppers. 

1 Sand Bath. 

1 Water bath. 

1 Funnel with stopcock. 

2 Chemical Thermometers. 
2 Burettes with pinchcocks. 
1 Clamp stand. 



152 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



1 Tripod stand. 

2 Gas jars, 1 litre, with ground rims, glass covers. 
$ doz. combustion tubes. 

1 lb. bard glass tubing. 

1 Lead dish, 2x3 inches. 

2 doz. Reagent Bottles, 2 ozs. 
1 doz. Reagent Bottles, 4 ozs. 

June, 1906. 



LIST OF APPARATUS. 

For the Experiments in the Elementary Science of the Public School Fifth 

Form and Continuation Class Courses, and of the Lower 

School of the High School. 

Probable Cost. 
1 Metric Scale, one foot long. The ordinary school rulers graduated 

in inches and centimeters will answer $> 02 

Meter Stick ' i 50 

Caliper, Simple form 50 

Dissected Litre Block 2 00 

Pinch-Cock 15 

Burette, Mohr's, 50 C.'C. graduated in tenths 2 00 

Measuring Cylinder, 100 C.C. graduated 80 

Beakers, different sizes 55 

Air Pump and Receiver 10 00 

Elastic Rubber Balloon. A toy balloon answers well 10 

Pendulum Bob 25 

Physical Balance, with set of Metric Weights 8 50 

Spirit Lamp or Bunsen Burner 40 

Spring Balance 50 

Glass Battery Jar, 9 in. deep, 8 in. diam. 50 

Mortar and Pestle 35 

Thistle Tubes Each 15... 30 

Transmission of Pressure Apparatus 75 

Archimedes Principle 1 75 

Globe for Weighing Air 3 00 

Barometer Tube, heavy glass 50 

Mariotte's Law Tube 1 50 

Lift Pump, Glass Model 1 25 

Force Pump, !Glass Model 1 25 

Hydraulic Press, Glass Model 2 00 

Filter Funnel 10 

Retort Stand (two rings) 50 

Small Florence Flasks with perforated rubber corks to fit 45 

Florence Flask with wide mouth 25 

Rubber Cork with two holes to fit Florence Flask with large mouth.. 15 

Hydrometer Jar x 45 

Porous Cup ..' 70 

Specific Gravity Bottle 75 

Weighted Wooden Prism, 1 square centimeter in section 25 

Tuning Fork, simple form 20 

Brass Rod for showing the production of Sound by longitudinal 

vibrations of rod 30 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 153 



Probable Cost. 

1 Whistle SO 10 

1 Coil Spring, about 1 in. in diameter and 2 feet long 25 

1 Bell in Vacuo 1 50 

1 Glass Tube about 2 cm. in diameter and 30 cm. long 15 

1 Glass Tube about 3 cm. in diameter and 50 cm. long 30 

1 Whirling Machine 3 50 

Cardboard Discs for Whirling Machine to show reflection of sound.. 50 
1 Toothed wheel with ring of holes to attach to Whirling Machine to 

illustrate pitch of sound 2 00 

1 Spool Piano Wire 10 

1 Toy Trumpet 10 

1 Ball and Ring 1 00 

1 iCompound Bar 1 00 

1 Thermometer, graduated in both Centigrade and Fahrenheit Degrees 1 00 

1 Differential Thermometer 2 50 

1 Calorimeter 2 00 

1 Conductometer 1 50 

1 Cardboard Screen with frame 50 

1 Reflection of Light Apparatus to be fitted also for reflection of sound 3 00 

1, Plane Mirror (small) 25 

1 Convex Lens (Reading Glass will answer) 50 

1 Triangular Glass Prism 50 

Pieces of Red, Green and Blue Glass 10 

Lodestone (small piece) 50 

2 Bar Magnets 50 

1 Horse-shoe Magnet 25 

1 Compass 25 

1 Bar Soft Iron, Round, 6 in. long 20 

Sheet Zinc and Sheet Copper (Pair Elements) 15 

2 Dry Cells Each 35 50 

1 Spool Double^Covered Magnet Wire, No. 20, to be used for making 

Electro-Magnets, etc 30 

1 Small Incandescent Lamp (3 volts) 25 

1 Pneumatic Trough 40 

4 Glass Bottles, (Pickle bottles will answer) 10 

4 Glass Slips, 2 inches square to cover mouth of bottles 05 

3 Soup Plates 20 

3 Hard Glass Test Tubes 30 

1 Test Tube Rack 25 

4 Reagent Bottles 4 ozs 50 

£ doz. Test Tubes, 5 in. x | in per doz. 25 

1 Doz. Test Tubes, 4 in. xj in per doz. 15 

2 U-Tubes, 6 in. x f in each 10 

1 lb. Glass Tubing, (soft) J in. to J in 60 

1 Retort, stoppered, 4 oz 25 

1 Lamp Chimney, (large) 10 

1 Electrolytic Apparatus 1 25 

2 yds. Rubber Tubing 3-16 in. inside, red per ft. 10 

Pieces of Mica 10 

1 Package of Picture Wire 10 

2 Files, one round, one triangular each 15 

2 Doz. Corks, assorted 10 

1 Package Filtering Paper, Circles, 6 in 25 

Candles 10 



154 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Probable Cost. 

\ Doz. Sheets Litmus Paper $0 30 

1 Sq. ft. Sheet Rubber per sq. ft. 25 

Wire Gauze 15 

Sealing Wax large stick 25 

I Small Vise for clamping wires 40 

Chemicals. 

Zinc, granulated, 1 lb 20 

Copper Clippings (sheet or wire) 1 lb 50 

Iron Filings, 1 lb 05 

Charcoal, (may be had from plumber) 25 

Coal (pieces of hard and soft) 

Mercury, 2 lbs 2 00 

Sodium, 1 oz 25 

Potassium, 2 drams dram 25 

Oxide of Mercury, red, 1 oz 25 

Oxide of Copper, 1 oz 15 

Manganese dioxide, \ lb 10 

Calcium oxide, (Lime, lumps) 

Sodium hydroxide, \ lb 2*5 

Potassium chlorate, 1 lb 25 

Potassium nitrate, 4 oz 10 

Potassium permanganate, 2 oz 15 

Calcium chloride (lumps) 

Ammonia solution, 8 oz. 10 

Ammonium nitrate, 4 oz 10 

Ammonium chloride, 6 oz 10 

Calcium carbonate, lumps of limestone, calcite, chalk, animal shells 

Carbon, specimens of coal, charcoal, graphite, lampblack 

Sulphuric acid 1 lb 05 

Nitric acid ?> 1 lb. 05 

Hydrochloric Acid, 8 oz 05 

Yellow Phosphorous, 1 oz 05 

Botany and Zoology. 

For the work in Botany and Zoology it is desirable that each Pupil should 
have a pocket magnifier (30-50 cents). A compound microscope ($11.00) 
should also form part of the school equipment for this work. These, together 
with a dozen glass slips and cover glasses, and a couple of needles mounted 
in wooden handles will be found to be all that is necessary for the course. 
Breeding cages for observing the development of insects may be made from 
waste crayon boxes or soap boxes by covering one side or end with mosquito 
netting or a pane of glass. 

General. 

A small cupboard should be provided for storing apparatus and chemi- 
cals, and a simple laboratory table for carrying out experiments. The table 
should be kept for this use alone where there is no laboratory. 

June, 1906. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 155 



RURAL SCHOOLS. 

Equipment for Domestic Science, Constructive Work and School 

Gardens. 

. Domestic Science. 

2 Granite saucepans, No. 10 $0 30 

2 " " (two sizes larger) 40 

1 Granite dishpan, eight quart size *. 35 

1 Tin pudding dish 20 

1 Tea-kettle, flat bottom, No. 6 60 

1 Stewpan, straight sided, quart size 20 

3 Bowls, white soup bowls, No. 12, each 05 

3 Plates, dinner size, white, No. 22, good quality 25 

(the above are to be good quality granite) 

1 Dover egg beater 10 

1 Egg beater 05 

2 Measuring cups, marked in 1-4, 1-3 10 

1 Grater 05 

1 Small steamer, and kettle to fit 50 

1 Cake tin, 8 x 5 x 2 in , 20 

1 Strainer or Sieve 15 

1 Towel rack. 4 leaved screen shape, cheaper one would do 50 

1 Meat board, hardwood, 10 x 12 in., 1 in. thick 15 

3 Wooden spoons 15 

2 Mixing bowls, 1 and 2 quart size ; 50 

1 Jug, 1 quart size 20 

2 Salt and pepper shakers (one each) 25 

1 Tea-pot, pint size, Brown Globe 20 

6 Pint fruit jars, for holding supplies 30 

1 Lemon reamer 10 

1 Crock, for garbage, with cover 25 

3 Frying pang, Acne, size 00, (1 would do if teacher does cooking). 15 

1 Can opener 10 

6 Teaspoons , 25 

3 Tablespoons 25 

6 Knives and forks, 3 forks would do 75 

3 Paring knives (2 would do) 30 

1 Spatula 30 

1 Rolling pin 15 

1 Pastry board .• 25 

6 Dish towels 75 

3 Dish cloths 15 

3 Scrub cloths 15 

3 Dusters 15 

1 Blue Flame stove, two burners, improved make, with oven 8 60 

(or single coal oil stoves, f 1.00 each, but these are not so good) 

Additional equipment desirable, but not essential. 

1 Kitchen table with drawer, might use table in room 2 50 

1 Flour box 45 

6 Cups and saucers (fewer would do) 50 



156 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



6 Medium size plates (fewer would do) $0 40 

1 Jug, 1 pint size 15 

1 Carving knife and fork 1 00 

1 Pair scissors 25 

Miscellaneous. 'Soap dish, hammer, cork screw, floor cloth, salt box, 

thermometer, wire strainer, dust pan, clock, etc., about 2 00 

The above list gives an approximate cost of a very simple equipment, 
but one with which good work could be done, and some individual work, say, 
three pupils working together. The kitchen table could be fitted with a 
framework underneath with doors, in which the utensils could be kept when 
not in use, and locked so as to prevent pupils tampering with them. The 
teacher may omit or add to the above as the requirements of the special case 
may demand. Table setting and serving may be taught on the kitchen table, 
when a tablecloth and sufficient dishes may be borrowed for the occasion, if 
considered too expensive to purchase. , 

The cost might be reduced to about |12.00. 

Attention should also be paid to needlework. The equipment for this 
is generally owned by each girl; scissors, rule, needle and thimble being all 
that is really necessary. When cutting out is done any flat top table may 
be used. 

Constructive Work. 

25 Pairs of scissors, 5 inches |5 00 

• 6 Knitting needles 30 

24 Pencil compasses 2 00 

6 Ticket punches 1 50 

24 Mill boards, 12 inches x 12 inches 1 00 

24 Rulers 1 25 

25 Pencils 50 

A box or tray should be provided to keep the above equipment when not 
in use. By arranging that all the classes shall not work at the same time, 
the equipment may be made to serve a large number. Most children will 
have rulers and pencils of their own, and, if necessary, they could be asked 
to bring scissors from home. The knitting needles are for "scoring." They 
should be broken in .two and the broken end thrust into whittled wooden 
handles making twelve scoring points. The mill boards are for protecting 
the tops of the desks, but sheets of newspaper may be substituted where it is 
desirable to reduce the expense. The scoring points may be used instead of 
punches, or a stout wire nail will make a very satisfactory hole through paper 
or thin cardboard. Brown paper, old copy book covers, and cardboard boxes 
may all be utilized in this work, thus reducing the expense foF material. 

For clay modelling, all the equipment that is necessary is' an earthen- 
ware crock in which to keep the clay. It should be covered by a damp cloth 
and sheets of newspaper. There should also be some brown paper or oil- 
cloth to cover the desks. 

School Gardens. 

Individual plots should vary from six feet square to six feet by ten 
according to the age and capacity of the pupil. If the plots are larger two 
pupils should work together. Twenty feet square is a convenient size for 
class plots in which experimental work with potatoes, corn, clover, cabbage, 
tomatoes, etc., may be conducted. In the larger schools two hours per week 
will be required, while in the smaller, one hour will suffice. There should 






1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 157 



be a garden shed about ten by twenty feet for storing tools and carrying on 
work not suitable to the class room, such as analysis of soils, selecting seeds, 
making labels, potting plants, etc. (See Minister's Report, 1904, page xxx.) 

Implements. 

12 Six-inch light weeding hoes $3 50 

12 Ten-inch steel rakes, light, ten-tooth 4 50 

18 Claw hand-weeders » 1 35 

2 Light (flat) short-handled shovels 1 50 

2 " " spades 1 50 

1 " " digging fork T5 

3 Transplanting trowels 50 

1 100-foot garden line and reel 90 

1 50-foot tape line 50 

1 Wheel-barrow 2 50 

1 Lawn mower 3 75 

1 Spray pump 3 50 

1 Light hatchet : 50 

1 Light hand saw 1 00 

1 Two-foot rule '. 25 

1 Try-square 40 

1 Small plane 75 

1 Flat file " 15 

The foregoing equipment is the minimum for a school of 25 to 30 pupils. 
The number of hoes, rakes and hand-weeders might each safely be put at 
one for every two pupils in average attendance. For average school the cost 
need not exceed $25. 

Vegetable Seeds. 

1 peck improved variety of potatoes ; 1 lb. beans, 2 varieties ; 1 lb. sugar 
corn, 2 varieties; 1-4 lb. beets, 2 varieties; 1 oz. carrots, 2 varieties; 1-2 oz. 
seed onion, 2 varieties; 2 oz. radish, 2 varieties; 1 oz. lettuce, 2 varieties; 1 
oz. parsnip; 1 oz. turnip ;1 pkt. cucumber; 1 pkt. cress; 1 pkt. kale; 1 pkt. 
kohl rabi; 1 pkt. summer savory; 1 pkt. sage. 

The following to be started in a hot-bed or window box : 1 pkt. cauli- 
flower; 1 pkt. Brussels sprouts; 1 pkt. celery; 3 pkts. cabbage, 3 varieties; 
3 pkts. tomato, 3 varieties. Estimated cost $2 00 



Flowering Annuals. 

To be started indoors or in hot-bed : 3 pkts. aster, mixed or 3 named 
Varieties; 2 pkts. balsams, mixed; 2 pkts. dianthus (pinks); 1 pkt. pansy; 
1 pkt. petunia; 1 pkt. portulaca ; 2 pkts. phlox Drummondi grnndiflora ; 1 pkt. 
Ricinus (Castor bean); 1 pkt. scarlet sage; 1 pkt. salpiglossis ; 1 pkt. sweet 
scabious; 1 pkt. ten-week stocks; 1 pkt. verbena. 

For open planting: 1-2 oz. sweet alysteum; 1-2 oz. candytuft; 1-2 oz. 
migonette; 2 pkts. dwarf nasturtium; 2 pkts. Eschscholtzia (California 
poppy) ; 2 pkts. Shirley poppy; 1 pkt. double mixed poppy; 1 pkt. tall nas- 
turtium; 1 pkt. mixed sweet peas; 1 pkt. double hollyhock (biennial); 1 pkt. 
Russian sunflower. Estimated cost $2 00 

July, 1906. 



158 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



MODEL SCHOOLS AND THIRD CLASS CERTIFICATES. 

In view of the Scarcity of Public School teachers and the probability 
that it will become still greater during the first session of the new Normal 
School system which will go into operation in September, 1907, the Educa- 
tion Department has authorized the following modifications of the existing 
Regulations in regard to Model Schools and Public School teachers' certi- 
cates : 

A County Board of Examiners may admit to the Model School — 

(1) Candidates holding Junior Teachers' certificates, who will be eighteen 
years of age on or before the reopening of the rural Public Schools for the 
second half of 1907; and 

(2) Candidates who will be eighteen years of age on or before September 
1st, 1906, and who have failed at the Junior Teachers' examination but 
whose marks warrant the County Board in presuming that, after further 
study, they will be able to pass the Junior Teachers' examination of 1907. 

The professional certificates shall not be issued in either of the above 
cases until the candidates comply with the present legal requirements as to | 
age and non-professional standing. 

August, 1906. 



MEMORANDUM. 

Courses of Study and Examinations. 

The revised Regulations of 1904, regarding the courses of study and the 
requirements for the Departmental examinations [see Regulations 43 (3), 46, 
47, and 48], are now in full force, except as follows : 

(1) As in 1905 and 1906, no examination will be held in 1907 in the 
subjects of Part 1 of the Junior Teachers' or District Certificate course; but 
no candidate will be admitted to any County Model School or other training 
school who does not furnish a statement from the Principal of the school 
attended, to the effect that the holder has completed satisfactorily the full 
course prescribed for Part 1. 

(2) Candidates who have already passed in one part of the Senior 
Teachers' examination under the regulations in force in 1905 and 1906 [see 
Reg. 50 (4)], with or without the Physics prescribed for such examination, 
must complete at one other examination the list of subjects as prescribed for 
Parts I. and II. in Regulation 47. For such candidates at the examination 
of 1907 the pass standard will be 34 per cent, of each paper and 50 per cent, 
of the aggregate of marks for the papers taken. 

In the case of the Mineralogy, the Geometry, and the Mediaeval and 
Modern History of the Upper School, the Department examiners will, as 
heretofore under similar circumstances, be instructed to bear in mind, when 
setting the papers therein, that the courses in these subjects will be taken 
up for the first time in the schools during the coming session. The details 
of these courses are given on pages 71 and 72, and in appendices C. and D. of 
the Regulations. The same consideration will be shown in the case of the 
Biology of the Upper 'School and the Geometry of the Middle School, 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 159 



Text-Books . 

The list of text-books authorized in August, 1905, for use in the Public 
Schools, High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and County Model Schools, 
will remain unchanged until further notice. Revised editions of books now 
on the list cannot be used. 

The text-books for the Normal College and the Normal Schools will be 
announced to the students at the beginning of the session. No Teachers' 
Reading Course is prescribed for 1907. 

August, 1906. 



SENIOR TEACHERS' EXAMINATION. 

Special Provisions for Public School Teachers. 

Regulation 47. — The subjects of examination shall be those prescribed 
for the Upper School of the High -Schools, and the examinations may be 
taken at one time or in two parts at different times, as follows : — 

Part I. — English Composition and Rhetoric, English Literature, 
Mediseval History, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, and Physics. 

Part II. — History (Modern and British), Biology, Latin, with Chemistry 
and Mineralogy, or French and German, or Greek and German, or Greek and 
French. 

Regulation 47 (above) is amended by the following addition: — 

Section I. — The Senior Teachers' examination may be taken in four parts 
at different times, as follows: — 

Part I. — English Composition and Rhetoric, Algebra, Geometry; 

Part II. — English Literature, Mediaeval History, Trigonometry; 

Part III. — Modern and British History, Latin, Physics; 

Part IV. — Biology with Chemistry and Mineralogy, or French and Ger* 

man, or Greek and German, or Greek and French; 

provided always that candidates take at least three of the four parts while 

actually engaged in teaching, and that they pass a practical examination in 

addition to the examination in the papers in Biology, Chemistry and Minera- 

Section II. — (1) Candidates qualified under section 1 preceding, who 
have failed in one subject at an examination in one of the parts, but who 
have made 40 per cent, of the marks on each of the other two subjects and 
60 per cent, of the total on said two subjects, may carry over to the examina- 
tion in a part subsequently taken, the examination on the subject in which 
they have failed. 

(2) Candidates qualified under section 1 preceding, who obtained Junior 
Leaving standing not later than 1900, may substitute for the course pre- 
scribed in Latin for the Senior Teachers' examination, the following courses 
in English Literature and the History of the English Language and Litera* 
ture : — 

I. English Literature — 

Familiarity with and intelligent appreciation of the following texts : — 

Chaucer: — The Prologue; Spenser: — The Faerie Queene — Book I.; Mil- 
ton: — Paradise Lost — Book I., L' Allegro and II Penseroso; Pope: — The 
Rape of the Lock — The Prologue to the Satires ; Goldsmith : — The Traveller, 
The Deserted Village; Wordsworth: — Ode on Intimations of Immortality, 



160 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Reverie of Poor Susan, Lucy Gray, Hart-leap Well, Lines composed a 
few miles above Tintern Abbey, Yarrow Unvisited, Yarrow Visited, Yarrow 
Revisited; Tennyson: — In Memoriam (one paper). 

II. The History of the English Language and Literature — 

A Brief History of the English Language — By 0. F. Emerson (The Mac- 
millan Co.) 

The History of English Literature as developed in the lives of the fol- 
lowing in The English Men of Letters Series : Chaucer, Spenser, Milton, 
Pope, Goldsmith, Wordsworth, Tennyson (one paper). 

September, 1906. 



COURSES FOR COMMERCIAL AND ART SPECIALISTS. 

Regulation 52. — Any person who passes the examination in the subjects 
set forth in Circular No. 2 — Courses for Commercial and Art Specialists — 
(each paper being valued at 100, and the standard being 40 per cent., in each 
and 60 per cent, of the aggregate, with 75 per cent, in honours), and who is 
holder of a High School Assistant's certificate, shall be entitled to an Interim 
Commercial or Art Specialist's certificate. 

After the examinations of 1905 the following shall be the details of each 
course. 

I. COMMERCIAL COUKSE. 

I. Book-keeping. 

Theoretical Book-keeping. — Single and double entry; general merchan- 
dising, commission business, manufacturing; single proprietor, partnership 
and corporation accounting, and changing from one form of ownership to 
another; plant, labor, material, and departmental accounts; practical treat- 
ment of such accounts as bank, discount, freight suspense, bad debts, de- 
preciation, etc., columnar cash books, journals, etc., and the various forms 
of books necessary for the different kinds of business; manufacturing, trad- 
ing, and profit and loss accounts, balance sheets; statements of income and 
expenditure, and of receipts and disbursements. (One paper). 

Practical Book-keeping. — Making the proper records and financial state- 
ments from given data. This may take the form of separate questions and 
problems, or of a set covering a certain period of time. (One 'paper). 

II. Penmanship. 

Theory and practice of penmanship ; position and movement ; principles 
of letter formation; graceful, legible business writing; ledger headings, 
figures, marking and engrossing. (One paper). 

III. Mercantile Arithmetic. 

Interest, discount, annuities certain, sinking funds, formation of 
interest and annuity tables, the application of logarithms, sfocks and in- 
vestments, partnership settlements, partial payments, equating or averag- 
ing accounts, exchange, practical measurements, and the metric system. 
(One paper). 



11HH> EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 161 



IV. General Commercial Knowledge. 

Business Papers.— Receipts, releases, promissory notes, chattel notes, 
lien notes, instalment notes, drafts, bills of exchange, orders, due bills, 
deposit slips, cheques, bank drafts, draft requisitions, deposit, receipts, 
bank pass books, bills, invoices, credit invoices, accounts, monthly state- 
ments, warehouse receipts, bills of lading, freight bills, proxies, power of 
attorneys, agreements, bonds, debentures, leases, instalment scrips, stock 
certificates, stock transfers. 

Business Laws, Bank/ fig, etc. — Negotiable paper, indorsement, accept- 
ance, discharge, dishonor, protest, negotiability and assignability, accom- 
modation paper, statute of limitations, statute of frauds, interest, money, 
payments, collection of accounts, partnership, joint stock companies, insur- 
ance; liability as partner, shareholder, director, agent, indorser, etc.; con- 
tracts — kinds, parties to, consideration, etc.; property, real and personal; 
mortgages, chattel and real estate; guarantee and suretyship; shipper and 
carrier; mechanics' lien; landlord and tenant — rights, duties and liabilities; 
principal and agent — relation to each other and to third parties; master and 
servant — relations, rights, duties and liabilities; wills and succession duties; 
copyrights, trade marks, industrial designs, patent rights — purpose and legal 
requirements; banking — organization, business, note issue, redemption fund, 
crossed cheques, etc. ; balance of trade — meaning and effect on an exchange. 

Statutory Requirements. — Relating to companies, partnerships, insol- 
vency, and winding up acts. (One paper). 

V. Auditing. 

Object, scope, and advantages of an audit; preliminary steps; instruc- 
tions to the book-keeper before an audit ; continuous and complete audits ; 
relation to prior audits; vouchers; trial balances and balanced books; indi- 
vidual, partnership, and company ownership; methods of accounting; differ- 
ent classes of audits, as commercial, mining, financial; valuation and veri- 
fication of assets and liabilities; depreciation, discounts, bad and doubtful 
debts, reserve funds, etc.; preliminary expenses, directors' fees, etc.; foreign 
exchange; nature of profits; forms of accounts and balance sheets; auditors' 
reports, recommendations and certificates. (One paper). 

YI. Economics. 

The principles of production, distribution, exchange and consumption ; 
value and price; land, labor and capital; rent, wages, and interest; mono- 
polies, etc. (One paper). 

VII. Stenography. 

Theory. — The principles of Phonography by Isaac Pitman. 

Practice. — "Writing from dictation at a speed of sixty words per minute, 
and accurate transcription into long hand at a speed of twelve words per 
minute; the dictated matter to comprise business correspondence and legal 
documents. (Two papers). 

11 E. 



162 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



YIII. History of Commerce and Transportation. 

Ancient and mediaeval commerce; commercial significance of the great 
geographical discoveries of the fifteenth century; the Dutch commercial 
ascendancy; struggle of the English, French, and Dutch ±or the first place 
in commerce; the English industrial revolution; commercial significance of 
the Napoleonic wars; England's industrial and commercial supremacy; 
French industry and commerce since the overthrow of Napoleon; the Ger- 
man Empire and its commercial position; recent economic growth of Russia; 
the Balkan States, and the commercial position of South America, Africa, 
Asia and Oceania. The growth of commerce and the distribution agencies 
of Canada and the United States; markets and public carriers; growth of 
the factory system and its relation to agriculture and the development of 
transportation facilities; relation of waterways to railways and the distri- 
bution of the waterways of the country and their effect on domestic com- 
merce. (One paper). 

Note. — The examinations for commercial specialists will be held in 
July at the same centres as the other departmental, examinations. 

Books of Reference Recommended. 

Canadian Accountant. J. W. Johnston, Belleville.^ 

Canadian Standard Bookkeeping. J. W. Westervelt, London. 

Joint Stock Company Accounts. D. Hoskins, Toronto. 

Accounting in Theory an4 Practice. Geo. Lisle. Wm. Green & Co., 
Edinburgh. 

Penman's Art Journal, (commence with September No.) 203 Broad- 
way, New York. 

The Theory of Finance. Geo. D. King. C. & E. Layton, Farringdon 
St., London, E. C, Eng. 

Digest of Canadian Mercantile Law. W. H. Anger, Toronto. 

Shareholders' Manual. J. D. Warde, Toronto. 

Assignments Act. Cassels. Hunter, Rose & Co., Toronto. 

Auditing (chapters 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8). L. R. Dicksee. Gee & Co., London, 
E. C, Eng. 

Elements of Political Economy. James Bonar. John Murray, Alber- 
marle St., London, Eng. ♦ 

Shorthand Instructor. <Sir Isaac Pitman. The Copp Clark Co., Toronto. 

The History of Commerce in Europe. H. de B. Gibbons. The Mac- 
Millan Co., London, Eng. 

Note. — For The Winding-up Act, see R.S.O. 

II. ART COURSE. 

I. Freehand Drawing. 

With pencil, pen and ink, charcoal, and black crayon. 

Drawing of common objects from observation and from memory. 

Imaginative Drawing. Illustration of stories. 

Principles of 'Perspective. 

Outdoor sketching. Sketching from school windows. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 163 



Drawing from the cast and the human figure. 

Rapid memory sketches of figures in motion. 

Composition. 

representation of flat and relief maps. (Two papers). 

II. Clay Modelling. 

Common objects. Eelief maps. Modelling from the cast. 

III. Color Drawing. 

Suggestion of form with brush and ink; representation of common objects, 
in monochrome tints; primary, secondary, and tertiary colors; proper com- 
bination of colors; watercolor and colored crayon drawings of common 
objects; outdoor sketching; sketching from the school windows. (One paper). 

IV. Industrial Design. 

In outline and color. 

Practical geometry as far as necessary for construction of designs; prin- 
ciples of design and anatomy of patterns; units of design adapted from prac- 
tical and geometrical forms ; designs for floorcloths, wall paper, bookcovers, 
advertisements, etc. (One paper). 

Y. Geometrical and Mechanical Drawing. 

Problems in practical geometry and perspective; orthographic and iso- 
metric projection; drawing from specifications; simple machine drawing; 
simple architectural drawing. (One paper). 

YI. Drawing on the Blackboard. 
With white chalk and colored crayons. 
Common objects; illustration of nature study, geography, etc. 

VII. History of Art. 

An outline of the origin and development of Architecture, Sculpture 
and Painting, with some knowledge of the life and works of the great artists 
of each of the leading periods. (One paper). 

Note. — (1) All the examinations for art specialists will be held in July 
at the Toronto Normal School. 

(2) The examinations in clay modelling, in sketching and in drawing 
on the blackboard will be practical. 

Books of Reference Recommended. 

Light and Shade. Cross. Ginn & Co., Boston. 
New Drawing Course. Yaughan. Nelson & Son, London, Eng. 
Clay Modelling. Holland. Ginn & Co., Boston. 

Clay Modelling, Elementary and Advanced. Alex. Gordon, Charles & 
Dible, London, Eng. 



164 THE REPORT OF THE No. l! 



Manual of Clay Modelling. Unwin. Longmans, Green & Co., London 
and New York. 

Elementary Brushwork Studies. Yeats. Philip & Son, London, Eng. 

Brushwork Studies. Yeats. Philip & Son, London, Eng. 

Color Study. Cross, (iinn & Co., Boston. 

Design and the Making of Patterns. Hatton. Chapman & Hall, Lon- 
don, Eng. 

Science and Art of Drawing. Spanton. The Macmillan Co. 

Geometrical and Perspective Drawing. Spanton. The Macmillan Co. 

Blackboard Drawing. Seaby. Nelson & Son, London, Eng. 

Blackboard Drawing. Whitney. Davis Press, North Scituate, Mass. 

Architectural Drawing. Edminster. The Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, 
N.Y. 

Ancient Sculpture. Redford (George). Sampson, Low & Co., London. 

How to Judge Architecture. Russell Sturgis. Baker & Taylor Co., 
New York City. 

How to Study Pictures. Caffin. Century Co., New York City. 

Masters in Art. Bates & Guild Co., Boston. The following numbers. 

Vol. I. Parts 2, 4, 6, 12; Vol. II. Parts 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 21, 24; Yol. 

III. Parts 32, 35; Yol. IY. Part 41; Yol. Y. Part 58; Yol. YI. Part 69. 

Where possible students should also refer to the following : — 

Plaster Casts and How they are Made. Frank Forrest Frederick. Corn- 
stock, New York. 

Modelling in Clay. A. L. Yago. Comstock, New York. 

Modelling. A Guide to Teachers and Students. E. Lanteri. Chap- 
man & Hall, London. 

Historv of Architecture. Banister Fletcher. Batsford, London. 

September, 1906. 



DEPARTMENTAL INSTRUCTIONS. 
High School Entrance Examination, 1907 

1. The High School Entrance examinations for 190T will begin on Wed- 
nesday, the 26th of June, at 8.45 a.m., and will be conducted under the 
provisions of section 41 of the High Schools Act and sections 23-28 of the 
Regulations, subject to the instructions herein contained. 

2. Candidates who purpose writing at the examination must notify the 
Public School Inspector before the 1st day of May. 

3. A teacher who has pupils writing at the High School Entrance ex- 
amination shall not be eligible to act as an Examiner or Presiding Officer 
where such pupils are writing. 

4. When the County Council recommends the holding of an examina- 
tion at any place other than the High School, the Presiding Officer shall be 
paid the sum of $3 per diem, and travelling expenses for conducting such 
examination, and the Examiners shall be allowed the sum of $1 per candi- 
date for reading the answer papers. It shall be lawful for the County 
Treasurer to pay all the expenses of such examination on the certificate of 
the County Inspector. 

Selections for Memorization. 

Lead, Kindly Light; A Psalm of Life; Flow Gently Sweet Afton; The 
Heritage; Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard; The Barefoot Boy; Ye 
Mariners of England. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 1C5 



The selections for memorization are common to both the Ontario and 
Catholic Readers. 

Duties of Inspector. 

5. The Inspector shall notify the Education Department not later than 
the 3rd day of May in each year of the number of persons desiring to be 
examined at any High School or other authorized place within his jurisdic- 
tion. 

6. In any city or town forming a separate inspectoral division, the 
Inspector or Inspectors of such city or town shall preside at the examinations, 
and in conjunction with the Board of Examiners for such city or town shall 
read the papers and report to the Education Department. 

7. In counties in which more High Schools than one are situated the 
Inspector for the county shall elect at which High School he will preside, and 
shall notify the Education Department of the choice lie makes, and in each 
of the other High Schools the Principal of the High School shall preside. 

8. In the case of examinations affiliated with a High School, the In- 
spector, within whose district such affiliated examinations are held, shall 
appoint Presiding Officers, who shall be teachers in actual service, notice of 
which shall be sent to the Education Department ; and such Inspector, to- 
gether w r ith the Examiners of the High School with which the examination 
is affiliated, shall be the Board of Examiners in all such cases. 

9. Where from the number of candidates, or any other cause, additional 
Presiding Officers are required, the Inspector shall make such appointments 
as are necessary, preference being given to the other members of the Board 
of Examiners. 

10. Where more examinations than one are held in an inspectoral 
division, the papers will be sent by the Education Department to the In- 
spector or the Presiding Officer, as the case may be. 

11. The parcel containing the examination papers shall not be opened 
till the morning of the examination day, nor shall any envelope containing 
the papers in any subject be opened until the time prescribed in the time- 
table for the examination in such subject. 



Duties of Presiding Officers. 

12. To be in attendance at the place appointed for the examination at 
least fifteen minutes before the time fixed for the first subject, and to see that 
the candidates are supplied with the necessary stationery and seated so far 
apart as to afford reasonable security against copying. 

13. To open the envelope containing the papers in each subject in full 
view of the candidates, at the time prescribed, and to place one paper on 
each candidate's desk. 

14. To exercise proper vigilance over the candidates to prevent copying, 
and to allow no candidate to communicate with another, nor permit any 
person except another Presiding Officer to enter the room during the exam- 
ination. 

15. To see that the candidates promptly cease writing at the .proper 
time, fold and endorse their papers properly, and in every respect comply 
with the instructions herein contained. 

16. To submit the answers of the candidates to the Examiners, accord- 
ing to the instructions from the Board. 



166 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



D ctie s of , Candidate s . 

17. Every candidate should be in attendance at least fifteen minutes 
before the time at which the examination is to begin, and shall occupy the 
seat allotted by the Presiding Officer. Any candidate desiring to rnove from 
his allotted place or to leave the room shall first obtain permission from the 
Presiding Officer to do so. Any candidate leaving shall not return during 
the examination in the subject then in hand. 

18. Every candidate shall write his answers on one side only of the 
paper, and number each answer. He shall arrange the sheets numerically, 
according to the questions, and fold them once crosswise, endorsing them 
with his name, the name of the subject, and the name of the place at which 
he is examined. A paper shall not be returned to a candidate after being 
placed in the hands of the Presiding Officer. 

19. Any candidate who is found copying from another or allowing an- 
other to copy from him, or who brings into the examination room any book, 
note or paper having any reference to the subject on which he is writing, 
shall be required by the Presiding Officer to leave the room, and his paper 
and the papers of all the guilty parties shall be cancelled. 

Duties of Examiners. 

20. The papers of the different candidates shall be so distributed that 
the same examiner shall read and value the answers in the same subject 
throughout. 

21. Marks are to be deducted for mis-spelt words and for want of neat- 
ness as indicated in Regulation 27. 

22. — (a) The reports of the Examiners are to be sent (by mail) to the 
Education Department on or before the 25th day of July by the Public 
School Inspector. 

(b) The bag which contains the question papers is to be returned to the 
Department (charges prepaid) at the same time as the reports are sent. 

(c) The answer papers of candidates, unless when specially requested, 
are not to be forwarded to the Department, but are to be retained by the 
Inspector until the 1st day of October, after which no case is to be reconsid- 
ered. 

(d) The Inspector shall issue a certificate to each candidate who passes 
the High School Entrance examination. 

Time Table. 

High School Entrance. 

Wednesday, June 26th. 

A.M. 8.45— 9.00 Reading Instructions (Circular 57). 

9 . 00— 11 .00 Composition . 

11.10—11.55 Spelling. 

P.M. 1.30— 3.30 ..Geography. 

Thursday, June. 27th. 

A.M. 9.00—11.30 Arithmetic. 

P.M. 1.30— 4.00 Written Reading. 



190(1 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 167 



Friday, June 28th. 

A.M. 9.00—11.00 English Grammar. 

11.10—12.00 ...Writing. 

P.M. — Oral Reading may be taken either Friday afternoon or at such 

other hours as are convenient. 
September, 1906. 



EXAMINATIONS, 1907. PRESCRIBED TEXTS. 

District Certificate. 

English : Tennyson, Ode to Memory, The Dying Swan, The Lotus Eat- 
ers, Ulysses, "You ask me, why," "Of old sat Freedom," "Love Thou Thy 
Land," "Tears, idle Tears," and the six interlude songs from the Princess, 
The Brook, Ode on the Duke of Wellington, Charge of the Light Brigade, 
Enoch Arden. 

Junior Teachers. 

English : Tennyson, Ode to Memory, The Dying Swan, The Lotus Eaters, 
Ulysses, "You ask me, why," "Of old sat Freedom," "Love Thou Thy 
Land," "Tears, idle Tears," and the six interlude songs from the Princess, 
The Brook, Ode on the Duke of Wellington, Charge of the Light Brigade, 
Enoch Arden; Shakespeare, Julius Caesar. 

Latin : Translation at sight of passages of average difficulty from Caesar, 
upon which special stress will be laid. 

Translation from a prescribed portion of Virgil's ^Eneid, with questions 
thereon. 

Questions on Latin accidence. 

Translation into Latin of English sentences to illustrate the common 
rules of Latin syntax, upon which special stress will be laid. The vocabulary 
will be taken from the prescribed portion of Caesar. 

Examination upon a short prescribed portion of Caesar, to test the candi- 
date's knowledge of Latin syntax and his pow r er of idiomatic translation, etc. 

The following are the texts prescribed : — 

Caesar, Bellum Gallicum, Book IV., chaps. 20-38, and Book V., chaps. 
1-23; Yirgil, ^neid, Book II., vv. 1-505. 

Two papers will be set : (1) Translation at sight, Yirgil, and accidence. 
(2) Translation into Latin, syntax, and idiomatic translation from prescribed 
Caesar, etc. 

Senior Teachers. 

Latin: Caesar, Bellum Gallicum, Book IV., chaps. 20-38, and Book V., 
chaps. 1-23; Virgil, ^Eneid, Book II.; Horace, Odes, Books III. and IV.; 
Cicero, Pro Lege Manilio, Pro Marcello. 

Greek: Xenophon, Selections in White's First Greek Book; Herodotus, 
Tales, ed. Farnell I. -XI. incl. ; Homer, Odyssey XXI.; Lucian, Timon; 
Lysias, Pro Mantitheo and de Invalido. 

English : Tennyson, Ode to Memory, The Dying Swan, The Lotus Eaters, 
Ulysses, "You ask me, why," "Of old sat Freedom," "Love Thou Thy 
Land," "Tears, idle Tears," and the six interlude songs from the Princess, 



168 THE REPORT OE THE No. 12 



The Brook, Ode on the Duke of Wellington, Charge of the Light Brigade, 
Enoch Arden; Shakespeare, Julius Caesar, Midsummer Night's Dream. 

German: Grimm Rotkappehen ; Anderson, Wie's der Alte maeht, Das 
neue Klied, Venedig, Rothschild, Der Bar; Ertl, Himmelsschlussel ; Froni- 
mel, Das eiserne Kreuz; Baumbach Nicotiana, Der Goldhaum; Heine, Lo- 
relei, Du bist wie eine Blume; Unland, Schafer's Sonntagslied, Das Schloss 
am Meer; Chamisso, Das Schloss Boncourt ; Claudius, Die Sterne, Der Riese 
Goliath; Goethe, Mignon, Erlkonig, Der Sanger; Schiller, Der Jiingling 
am Bache. 

1907: Hauff, Das kalte Herz. 

Baumbach, Der Schwiegersohn ; Elz, Er ist nicht eif erstichtig ; Wichert, 
Post Festum. 

French : Lamennais, Paroles d'un croyant, chaps. VII. and XVII. ; 
Perrault, le Maitre Chat ou le Chat botte; Dumas, Us nez gele, and la Pipe 
de Jean Bart; Alphonse Daudet, la Derniere Classe, and la Chevre de M. 
Seguin; Legouve, la Patte de dindon ; Pouvillon, Hortibus ; Loti, Chagrin 
d'un vieux forcat; Moliere, l'Avare, Acte III., sc. 5 (Est-ce a votre cocher 
. . . sous la mienne); Victor Hugo, Waterloo, chap. IX.; Rouget de d'Isle, 
la Marsellaise; Arnault, la Feuille ; Chateaubriand, l'Exile; Theophile Gau- 
tier, la Chimere ; Victor Hugo, Extase ; Lamartine, l'Automne; De Musset, 
Tristesse; Sully Prudhomme, le Vase brise; La Fontaine, le Chene et le 
Roseau. 

190T : Labiche, la Grammaire ; Sand, la Mare au Diable. 

October, 1906. 



COUNTY MODEL SCHOOL. 

The attention of County Boards of Examiners is directed to the provi- 
sions of the Regulations (Sections 57-65), to the information in the Model 
School Calendar, and to the following : 

I. 

Admission Requirements. 

(1) Candidates for admission to the County Model School must be 18 
years of age on or before the close of the Model School term. 

(2) The applicant must be the holder of one of the following certificates : 
— (a) A Part II. Junior Teachers' certificate, or a Part II. Junior Leaving 
certificate, each endorsed as provided in section 50 (3) of the Regulations; 
(b) A Senior Teachers' certificate, Parts I. and II., or Senior Leaving cer- 
tificates, Parts I. and II. ; (c) A District certificate endorsed as provided by 
section 50 (5) of the Regulations, or its equivalent as provided by section 43 
(5) of the Regulations. (Note:— Part I. Junior Leaving certificates or Pub- 
lic School Leaving certificates, issued under previous Regulations, entitle 
the holders to non-professional District certificate standing.) 

County Boards of Examiners are required to insist on the necessary en- 
dorsation of the non-professional certificates before admitting candidates to 
a Model School. 

II. 

Professional District certificates shall be granted only with the permission 
of the Minister of Education. Only holders of full Junior Teachers' or 
Junior Leaving standing, or higher standing are eligible to receive Third 
Class certificates from County Boards of Examiners. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 169 



III. 

Renewals may be made for the reasons given in section 87 of the Regu- 
lations for not more than three years in all, except when a teacher's certificate 
expires in December in any year such teacher may be granted a further ex- 
tension of six months to enable him to enter the Normal School the following 
September. The reasons for each renewal must be stated in the proper column 
of the report of the County Board of Examiners (Form No. 71). 

IV. 

As the Principal of the Model School is required to report upon the 
standing of each teacher-in-training in the subject of Nature Study, provision 
should be made for adequate instruction in this subject. Oral Reading will 
be reported on by the Board of Examiners, and Methods in Reading by the 
Model School Principal as in the case of the other subjects mentioned in sec- 
tion 61 of the Regulations. 

y. 

Answer papers, with the Model School Principal's report, are to be re- 
tained by the Board. The former may be destroyed after the 1st of March 
following. The .decision of the Board with respect to the examination shall 
ho final. 

VI. 

The Board is requested to fill out the final report (Form 71) with all 
details asked for and to forward it to the Education Department not later 
than the 31st of December. 

Time Table. 

Third Class Professional Examinations. 

December, 1906. 

The closing examinations of the County Model Schools will begin on 
Tuesday, December 11th. The examination in Practical Teaching* and in 
Reading will be held after the close of the written examination, at such time 
as the Board of Examiners deems most convenient. 

Tuesday, 11th December. 

A.M. 8.45— 9.00 Reading Regulations. * 

9.00 — 11.30 Methods — Arithmetic and Penmanship. 

P.M. 1.00— 3.30 Methods— Literature and Spelling. 

3.40 — 4.40 School Law and Regulations. 

Wednesday, 12th December. 

A.M. 9.00—11.30 Science of Education. 

P.M. 1.00— 3.30 Methods— History and Geography. 



170 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Thursday, 13th December. 

A.M. 9.00 — 11.30 Methods — Grammar and Composition. 

P.M. 1.00—2.30 School Management. 

October, 1906. 



TEACHING DAYS FOE 1906. 

High School and Collegiate Institutes and Public and Separate Schools 
in cities, towns and incorporated villages have the following number of 
teaching days in 1906 : 

Dates of Opening and Closing. 

Open 3rd January. Close 12th April. 

Reopen 23rd April. Close 29th June. 

Reopen 4th September. Close 21st December. 

January 21 

February 20 

March 22 

April 15 

May 22 

June 21 

121 

July 

August 

September 19 

October ' 23 

November 22 

December 15 

79 



Total 200 

Rural Public and Separate Schools have the following number of teach- 
ing days in 1906 : 

Dates of Opening and Closing. 

Open ...3rd January. Close 12th April. 

Reopen 23rd April. Close 29th June. 

Reopen 20th August. Close 21st December. 



January t 21 

February ■ 20 

March 22 

April 15 

May 22 

June 21 

121 

July 

August 10 

September 19 






]906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 171 



Dates of Opening and Closing. — Continued. 

October 23 

November 22 

December 15 

89 

Total 210 



TEACHING DAYS FOR 1907. 

High School and Collegiate Institutes and Public and Separate Schools 
in cities, towns and incorporated villages have the following number of teach- 
ing days in 1907 : 

Dates of Ofening and Closing. 

Open 3rd January. Close 28th March. 

Reopen 8th April. Close 28th June. 

Reopen 3rd September. Close 20th December. 



January 21 

February 20 

March 20 

April 17 

May 22 

June 20 

120 

July , 

August 

September 20 

October 23 

November 21 

December 15 

79 



Total 199 

Rural Public and Separate Schools have the following number of teach- 
ing days in 1907 : 

Dates of Opening and Closing. 

Open 3rd January. Close 28th March. 

Reopen 8th April. Close 28th June. 

Reopen 19th August. Close 20th December. 

Note. — Christmas and New Year's holidays (22nd December, 1906, to 2nd January, 
"907, inclusive), Easter holidays (13th to 22nd April, inclusive), Midsummer holidays 
-for High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and in cities, towns, and incorporated 
villages, 30th June to 3rd September, inclusive; rural schools, 30th June to 19th 
August, inclusive), all Saturdays and Local Municipal holidays, Dominion or Provincial, 
and Public Fast, or Thanksgiving Days, Labor Day [1st Monday (3rd) of Sept.] and 
the anniversary of Queen Victoria's Birthday (Thursday, 24th May), are holidays in 
the High, Public and Separate Schools, and no other days can be deducted from the 
proper divisor. The above named holidays are taken into account in this statement, 
so far as they apply to 1906, except any Public Fast or Thanksgiving Day, or Local 
Municipal holiday. Neither Arbor Day nor Empire Day is a holiday. 



172 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Dates of Opening and Closing. — Continued. 

January 21 

February 20 

March 20 

April 17 

May 22 

June 20 

121? 

July 

August 10 

September 20 

October 23 

November 21 

December 15 

. 89 



Total 209 

Note. — Christmas and New Year's holidays (21st December, 1907, to 2nd January, 
1908, inclusive), Easter holidays (29th March to 7th April, inclusive), Midsummer 
holidays (for High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and in cities, towns and incorpor- 
ated villages, from 29th June to 2nd September, inclusive ; rural schools, 29th June 
to 18th August, inclusive), all Saturdays and Local Municipal holidays. Dominion or 
Provincial, Public Fast, or Thanksgiving Days, Labor Day [1st Monday (2nd) of Sept.], 
and the anniversary of Queen Victoria's Birthday (Friday, 24th May), are holidays in 
the High, Public and Separate Schools, and no other days can be deducted from the 
proper divisor. The above named holidays are taken into account in this statement, 
so far as they apply to 1907, except any Public Fast or Thanksgiving Day, or Local 
Municipal holiday. Neither Arbor Day nor Empire Day is a holiday. 



THE ADVISORY COUNCIL OF EDUCATION. 
Powers and Duties in Respect to Examinations. 

I. (a) The Advisory Council shall appoint examiners of well known abil- 
ity as teachers in either a University or a High School to set examination 
papers for the Junior or Senior Teachers' and the University midsummer 
Junior Matriculation examinations. 

(6) The Council shall also appoint examiners of well known ability as 
inspectors or teachers to set examination papers at such other Departmental 
examinations as may be entrusted to it by the Education Department. 

(c) The persons appointed examiners under (a) and (b) above shall not 
be engaged in the preparation of candidates for the examinations concerned. 

(d) For the purpose of reading the answer papers of candidates at the 
examinations in (a) above, the Council shall appoint as associate examiners 
persons holding specialists' certificates according to the regulations of the 
Education Department, or graduates of any British University. Such per- 
sons shall be actually engaged in teaching, and shall have at least two years' 
successful experience in this Province. 

(e) For the purpose of reading the answer papers of candidates at the 
other Departmental examinations, the Council shall appoint as associate 
examiners persons holding at least First Class certificates, who have been 
successful teachers and who are actually engaged in teaching. 



fi 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 173 



(/) For the purpose of reading the answer papers at special non-profes- 
sional examinations or at such professional examinations as may be entrusted 
to it by the Education Department, the Council shall appoint as associate 
examiners persons specially qualified. 

(g) The lists from which the selections are made shall be prepared, in 
the case of the examiners in (a) above and of the associate examiners in (d) 
above, by the President of the University of Toronto and the Superintendent 
of Education; and shall be furnished in the case of the examiners in (b) 
above and of all the other associate examiners, by the Minister of Education. 
All the lists shall contain the names of more than the number of persons 
required for the examinations. 

(h) Except in the case of an emergency, no examiner or associate exam- 
iner shall be appointed for more than three consecutive years. 

(i) Any candidate except a candidate at the University Scholarship ex- 
aminations may have his papers re-examined on appeal made to the Minister 
of Education not later than September loth. 

(,/') The Council shall also have power to appoint from the lists of exam- 
iners supplied to it, such persons as may be required for reading the answer 
papers of candidates who have appealed to the Minister of Education for a 
re-examination of their answer papers. 

(h) The number of examiners and associate examiners from year to year 
for each examination shall be settled by the Minister of Education on the 
report of the Chairman of the Board of Examiners. 

II. The standard and character of the examination papers shall be de- 
termined by the regulations and instructions of the Education Department 
and the University of Toronto respectively. 

III. Subject to the regulations and instructions of the Education De- 
partment and the University of Toronto respectively, the Council shall have 
power to settle the results of all the examinations entrusted to it by the Edu- 
cation Department and to report thereon to the Minister of Education. The 
settlement in the case of the Departmental examinations shall not be valid 
until approved of by the Superintendent of Education. 

IY. (a) All communications or references requiring the attention of the 
Advisory Council shall be addressed to the Deputy Minister of Education. 

{b) The Advisory Council shall appoint an executive committee of not 
more than three members. 

(c) The Superintendent of Education shall submit to the Advisory 
Council for consideration all matters referred to it by the Minister of Edu- 
cation. 

(d) The Registrar of the Advisory Council shall be Chairman of the 
Board of Examiners and of any committee thereof, and shall perform the 
duties set forth in Circular, "Instructions," No. 7. 

November, 1906. 



THE COURSE AND THE EXAMINATION IN UPPER SCHOOL 

GEOMETRY FOR 1907. 

At the examination for the Senior Teachers' non-professional certificate 
next July (1907) no questions will be set on Section B. — Synthetic Geometry 
— of the Upper School course. After 1907, the examination will be on the 
whole course as set forth on pp. 85-91 of the Regulations. 



174 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The following corrections have also been made in the course as given 
on p. 90: 
For 

. AA'+BB' 

cos 0— — - — 

\ZA*-\-B> ^/A ri +B n 

read 

A A' B—A B f 
tan $= AA'ABB' 
Prefix signs as below : 
Aa+Bb+C 
Al-\-Bm 
.Aa+Bb+C 



l/A 2 +B 2 

On p. 91, for "Length of tangent" read "Square of tangent." 
November, 1906. 



THE RECENT AMENDMENTS TO THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ACT. 

(Memorandum from the Minister of Education.) 

I. The Duty of the State 

The first duty of the State is to provide conditions conducive to good 
citizenship. Foremost among these conditions is an efficient system of Dublic 
instruction, especially in a democratic community, for there especially the 
voter must be educated. Each Provincial Government, accordingly, accepts 
full responsibility by enacting compulsory educational laws and regulations 
and enforcing their observance by a comprehensive system of inspection. 
Moreover, each Government contributes largely of the public funds for the 
support of education; it requires the municipalities to provide their share 
for the same purpose; and our Public Schools are free. 

II. Conditions of Efficiency in Schools. 

Efficiency in a school system cannot be secured without competent teach- 
ers and suitable accommodations and equipment; and competent teachers 
cannot be secured unless the salaries paid them are such as to induce men 
and women of maturity, scholarship and ability to become and to remain 
teachers. 

III. The Seriousness of the Present Public School Situation. 

For some years the Public School system of Ontario, as a whole, has 
been in an unsatisfactory condition. The following are evidences of the 
seriousness of the present situation : 

(1) The general discontent with the condition of the Public Schools (the 
rural schools in particular), as shown for years by adverse and widespread 
newspaper criticisms, by the complaints of public men, and by the repre- 
sentations of Public School inspectors and other educationists who know the 
situation at first hand. 



i<mk; 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



175 



(2) The scarcity of teachers and the resultant lowering- of the standard 
of their qualifications. 

As the schools must be kept open, an insufficient supply of teachers 
necessarily lowers the standard. The statistics demonstrate this; for the 
number of temporary certificates and certificates lower than third class rose 
in rural schools from 463 in 1903 to 954 in 1905, and the number for the 
present year will show a still greater increase, notwithstanding the efforts 
the Department has made to prevent it. The seriousness of the situation is 
emphasized by the following additiona] statistics : In 1905, of 5,694 teachers 
in the rural schools, 2,904 held third class certificates; 1,693, second class; 
and, in all the rural schools of this rich and prosperous Province of Ontario, 
there were only 143 teachers with first class certificates. The statistics of 
the urban schools make a better showing; for, in the same year, of 2,985 
in these schools, 88 held temporary, or lower than third class; 232 third 
class; 2,159 second class, and 506 first class. 

(3) The large number of female teachers and the decrease in the number 
of male teachers. 

The following table shows the general tendency in the Public Schools 
since 1877 : 



Year. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


Year. 


Total. 


Male. 


Female. 


1877 


6,134 

6,467 
7,103 
7,818 


2,915 
2,964 
2,627 
2,635 


3,219 
3,503 
4,476 
5,183 


1897 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 


8,370 
8,497 
8,560 
8,610 
8,679 


2,690 

2,200 
2,062 
1,957 
1,839 


5,686 


1882 

1887 

1892 


6,297 
6,498 
6,653 
6,840 



In the rural schools, in 1903, 1,542 were males and 4,115 females; and, 
in 1905, 1,320 were males and 4,374 females. Here also the urban munici- 
palities make a better showing; for, in 1903, 520 were males and 2,383 fe- 
males; and, in 1905, 519 were males and 2,466 females. The seriousness of 
the situation is, however, shown more unmistakably by the statistics of the 
Normal School attendance. In 1901, 121 male teachers attended the Normal 
Schools; and in 1902, 123; while, on the lengthening of the term, the num- 
bers each year from 1903 to 1906 were only 14, 22, 18, 20; that is, of a total 
attendance for these years of 1,162, only 74 were males. 

The preponderance of females is due to the fact that the inducements 
for males to enter the teaching profession have year after year become less 
and less potent, owing largely to the greater remuneration offered elsewhere. 

For junior forms, female teachers are more suitable than male teachers; 
but, for fourth and fifth forms, male teachers are generally necessary. This 
proposition needs no defence. 

(4) The increase in the number of teachers who are young (in most 
cases from eighteen to twenty-one or twenty-two) and who remain teachers 
only a short time. 

This condition is due partly, as above, to the inducements in other occu- 
pations and partly to the fact that the girls, who are by far the more numer- 
ous, become teachers with no intention of remaining longer than the three 
years for which their third class certificates are valid. The teachers in the 
rural schools are, accordingly, continually changing. The average term of 
service, indeed, is less than five years. It stands to reason that we cannot 



176 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



have efficiency under such conditions. No business in which most of the 
experienced employees are replaced every five years by other and inexperi- 
enced ones, could possibly succeed. 

(5) The general condition of the rural schools to-day is, in many sec- 
tions, little, if at all, better than it was twenty or twenty-five years ago. 

As a class, the rural schools have not benefited by the prosperity of the 
country, nor have they advanced as have the High Schools and the Univer- 
sities. In the suitability of their accommodations and in their equipment, 
including libraries, etc., they are, generally speaking, relatively and abso- 
lutely defective. The best teachers, too, are leaving the rural schools and 
entering upon other occupations, or they are going west to the new Provinces, 
where, instead of the $25.0, $300, or $350 they get here, they can readily 
obtain from $600 to $800 a year. In fact, for years, our Normal Schools 
have been training teachers for Manitoba and the western Territories; and, 
to keep up our supply, we have had to resort to the products of the Model 
School, and insufficiently trained inexperienced teachers, and to holders of 
temporary certificates. The salaries, too, in some places in Ontario are now 
actually lower than they were ten or fifteen years ago, notwithstanding the 
increased cost of living. To-day we must pay the man who splits our wood 
at least $1.50 a day; we can get a teacher — a poor one, indeed — at less than 
a dollar a day. The cause is not far to seek; many sections market their 
schools and take the cheapest (and generally the poorest) applicant. Some 
years ago, when there were forty or fifty applicants for nearly every vacancy, 
the standard was not at once raised. Under-bidding lowered salaries, and 
this inevitable result has in turn become the cause of our present distress. 

IV. How Improvement may be Effected. 

While most of the poorer sections spend as much on their schools as can 
be expected from them and many are spending even more; while, also, many 
sections are spending- a fair amount, a very large number are spnding far 
less than they are able. The Government is charged with the responsibility 
of maintaining an efficient system; and, owing to the default of the section 
boards, which are primarily responsible, the Government is bound to inter- 
fere. As has already been pointed out, the efficiency of the schools depends 
upon the suitability of the accommodations and the equipment, the qualifica- 
tions of the teachers, and the salaries paid them. Improvment on these 
three lines is, accordingly, the present object of the Government's policy. 

The Legislative and County grants will hereafter be distributed on a basis 
which will improve both the accommodations and the equipment, and to assist 
boards in providing proper equipment, the Legislature, at its last session, 
made a special grant of $10,000 to the Continuation classes, and of $10,000 
to the District schools. For general purposes, it gave a special grant of 
$60,000 to the rural schools in old Ontario and required the counties to add 
the equivalent of this special grant and of the grant to Continuation classes. 
An extra township grant of $150 is also to be raised this year to give boards 
further assistance in preparing the accommodations and equipment for the 
new scheme of distributing the Legislative and County grants. Former 
Regulations have always provided for a minimum equipment for every 
Public School ; but in many instances they have been insufficiently complied 
with, to the great disadvantage of education. The minimum prescribed in 
Circular 33, is necessary for a modern programme taught by modern methods, 
and for every school under the improved conditions of education to which 
we hopefully look forward. Moreover, in a few years, boards will be recouped 
for their present expenditure by the minimum grant to which each school 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 177 



which provides the equipment will be entitled under the Public Schools Act. 
Circular 33 also gives the details of the different items of accommodations, 
and a large proportion of the Legislative and County grants will be distributed 
on this basis. Those boards, accordingly, that have followed the recom- 
mendations of the circular will next July meet with their reward. (Circular 
33 and instructions, No. 12, may be obtained on application to the Public 
School Inspector). 

To increase the efficiency of the teachers, the Government is also provid- 
ing an improved system of professional training in the form of three addi- 
tional Normal Schools for old Ontario and one for new Ontario, at a capital 
cost of more than $250,000, and an increase of the yearly expenditure for 
maintenance of more than $60,000. With the addition of a Faculty of Edu- 
cation in the Provincial University, which has now been arranged for, we 
shall have, in a couple of years, a complete and modern system of training 
for all grades of teachers. The new scheme of professional training will pro- 
vide for two main grades of Public School teacher certificates, first class and 
second class. The work for first class teachers and High School assistants 
will be taken up in the new Faculty of Education in Toronto University ; 
that for second class in the reorganized Normal Schools. It is, however, in- 
tended to provide in addition for the less advanced counties in old Ontario 
and the poorer parts of the districts, teachers with qualifications correspond- 
ing to those of the old third class certificates (primary non-professional). 
The professional work for these certificates will be taken up in a few Model 
Schools which will be retained for the purpose and made thoroughly efficient. 
Such certificates will, of course, be confined to the counties and districts 
concerned, and it is hoped will gradually disappear. 

But these improvements would be of little avail if we did not secure and 
retain competent men and women by providing adequate salaries. The ex- 
perience of all other professions and of the trades has shown that the fixing 
of fees and wages cannot be left to the generosity of individual employers. 
Unlike the members of the other professions and the trades, our teachers are 
not permitted to manage their own affairs. Combinations and strikes among 
them would, therefore, be ineffectual. Moreover, as the Government is 
directly responsible for our educational system, combinations and strikes 
would be intolerated. In justice, therefore, to the Public School Teachers, 
whose salaries have long been inadequate, the Government has been compelled 
to interfere, and owing to the critical condition of affairs, to interfere without 
delay. 

It is an acknowledged principle of taxation in a democratic community, 
that the rich should help the poor in any matter that concerns the interests 
of the whole community. On this sound principle have been based the county 
and township levies for school purposes. As a result of last session's legisla- 
tion, the county now gives at least the equivalent of the special grant of 
$60,000, and the township grant has been increased, according to the assess- 
ment, from $150 to $300 when the average assessed value of the township is 
not less than $30,000 per section. And further, after 1906, the latter grant 
must be applied to the teacher's salary, with an addition from section funds 
of from $200 to $25, according to the ability of the school board as measured 
by the value of the assessment. This addition, it should, however, be noted, 
is not necessarily a tax on the section ; for the Government grant, and, in 
many cases, other sources of revenue, are available. 

As regards minimum salaries, the effect of last session's legislation is 
as follows : Where the average assessed value of a township is equal to at 
least $30,000 per school section and the assessed value of a section is at least 
$200,000, $150,000, $100,000, $50,000, $30,000 or below $30,000, the mini- 

12 e. 



178 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



mum salary respectively payable to a principal teacher would be for the 
whole yea/$500, $450, $400', $850, $325, or $300, and, in any case, for each 
assistant, $300. If, however, the average assessed value of the township is 
less than $30,000 per section, the township grant is still $150, and the mini- 
mum salary payable a principal teacher would vary, as above, from $350, 
where the section assessment is $200,000 to $150, where it is less than 
$30,000; and for every assistant teacher employed the whole year the mini- 
mum would be $200. From this it is clear that the poorer sections in town- 
ships where the average section assessment is less than $30,000, are not yet 
so well situated financially as are the poorer sections in other townships; 
and it is equally clear that they and other needy sections must now be helped 
either by legislation or by special legislative grants, or by both. 

An important effect of the recent legislation is, what has long been urged, 
a fair approximation to an equalization of school taxation. It is manifestly 
unfair that Jones who. lives on one side of the road should pay two or three 
times as high a rate on the dollar to maintain his school, as does Smith who 
lives on the other side, simply because iSmith lives in the wealthier section. 
And further, had the Government simply provided the $300 township grant 
without attaching the condition of a minimum local addition, many sections, 
well able to pay more, would, undoubtedly, make $300 the maximum of the 
teacher's salary. 

Having regard, therefore, to the requirements of the public service, the 
plan adopted is as fair a one as could be devised. Moreover, the principle 
of minimum salaries had the unanimous support of both sides of the Legis- 
lature at its recent session. True, the richer sections help the poorer ones; 
but there is nothing exceptional in this. A man's ability to pay is the basis 
of our system of taxation, and the claims of the commonwealth are superior 
to those of the individual. 

V. Objections Considered. 

Naturally enough, these changes have in some quarters provoked oppo- 
sition. The following are the chief objections : 

(1) "Well qualified teachers should have been provided before boards 
were called upon to increase salaries." 

Even for the teachers we now have, the salaries are often absolutely and 
relatively too low, and, what is more directly to the point, teachers could not 
be induced to double the cost of their professional training, as will be re- 
quired by the new Normal School system, if they had not the assurance of 
fair salaries after completing their course. The improvement — the immedi- 
ate improvement — of the teachers' salaries is the key to the situation. 

(2) " Instead of coercing boards to give higher salaries, moral suasion 
should have been applied in the form of a campaign of education." 

The condition of affairs has been shown to be critical; and, while a cam- 
paign of education is desirable under any circumstances and is now being 
conducted under instructions from the Government by Public School In- 
spectors and others, such a campaign would take too long to remedy the 
present serious evils, even if — which is most unlikely — it. succeeded in the 
end in doing so generally. 

(3) "The qualifications of the teacher should have been taken into account 
in fixing the minimum salary." 

Experience has shown that if the salary offered is adequate, applicants 
with the required qualifications will present themselves. Besides, it is the 
intention of the Education Department to prescribe the qualifications for 
different grades of school. Before long it will be impossible for a teacher 

12a E. 



190G EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 179 



with a low grade certificate to hold, as he now may, the principalship of the 
most important Public School in the Province. 

(4) ''Some sections with a small school attendance and a high assessment 
must pay a high salary." 

A small attendance is just as much entitled to a good teacher as a large 
attendance, more especially as the school tax is on property which is well 
able to pay it without an exceptional increase of the rate. Besides, under 
the Public Schools Act, one section may unite with an adjoining one, or a 
section may close its school and pay fees for the admission of its children to 
the school of an adjoining section. If, indeed, the recent amendments to 
the Act lead to the establishment of consolidated schools, their existence will 
have been amply justified even on this ground alone. 

(5) "Urban municipalities have not been included in the scheme for in- 
creasing the salaries of Public School teachers. The farmers have been, 
singled out by this special legislation." 

The statistics showing the grades of teachers employed and the salaries 
paid in the urban and rural municipalities demonstrate the fact that it is 
rural municipalities that need special and prompt legislation. Nor should 
the fact be overlooked that, while the Legislature has singled out the farm- 
ers for this special taxation, it has also singled them out already for a special 
legislative school grant of over $70,000 and has given all the sections a 
county grant and most of them a doubled township granU Moreover, the 
Government does not take the ground that last session it did all it intends 
to do in carrying out its pledge to make the Public Schools its first and chief- 
est care. It is true, however, that some urban boards pay too small salaries, 
and that many are poorly equipped. It will, accordingly, be necessary to 
propose legislation on this subject when the Public Schools Act is con- 
solidated. 

(6) "The course taken of coercing school boards is exceptional and of- 
fensive." 

As has already been made clear, even if the recent action of the Legis- 
lature in prescribing minimum salaries were a drastic one, the present con- 
dition of affairs would justify it. Moreover, all laws are based on coercion 
and are made for the good of the community. It may here be pointed out 
that the only other effective course open to the Education Department would 
have been to raise the standard of the qualifications, and to restrict the sup- 
ply of teachers. This course would have forced salaries up, but it would 
have been coercion indeed — coercion, moreover, applied without regard to 
the necessities of the schools, which necessities the Education Department is 
bound to consider. It may be pointed out also that except in the matter of 
fixing a minimum salary, the Education Department has interfered in no 
way with the responsibility of school trustees. 

But the mandatory feature of the recent school legislation is not an 
exceptional one; it is simply an extension of what has been long applied in 
similar cases; 

(a) The salaries of ordinary civil servants are fixed and paid by Gov- 
ernment. 

(b) Those of semi-civil servants are fixed where part is paid by the Gov- 
ernment and part by the locality; e.g., Public School Inspectors. 

(c) Those of semi-civil servants are fixed where the whole salary is paid' 
by the locality; e.g., Police Magistrates. 

(d) Those of semi-civil servants who are paid by fees are also prescribed! 
by a scale of fees; e.g. Local Registrars. 

The teacher is also a semi-civil servant ; for the Government prescribes 
his qualifications, restricts his liberty of action, and even contributes towards) 



180 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



his salary. In view, accordingly, of the importance to the state of an effi- 
cient school system, the state is bound to protect him when it is shown that 
he is suffering an injustice. 

Moreover, the principle of minimum salary is applied in other cases. In 
the Church, where, unfortunately, the conditions resemble those of the teach- 
ing profession, three denominations have established minimum salaries — the 
Presbyterians, $800 and a manse for married men and those with relatives 
dependent on them; for others, $750; the Methodists, for married men, 
$750; for single men (ordained), $600; and for probationers, $400; and the 
Baptists, $750. And, as is well known throughout the Province, the various 
trades unions take forcible and effective means to secure proper wages. 

Nor is a scheme of minimum salaries a novelty in education : In some 
of the States of the Union — in Mississippi, Indiana, Maryland, West Vir- 
ginia, and even in the rich commonwealth of Pennsylvania — where condi- 
tions similar to ours have prevailed, the minimum salary plan has been estab- 
lished. In Indiana a penalty not exceeding $100 has been fixed for each 
violation of the minimum salary law. The State Superintendent of Penn- 
sylvania writes that the plan has been successful, and that salaries have gone 
up, although fears were entertained at first to the contrary. The State Super- 
intendent of Indiana also writes that the law is working satisfactorily to the 
people, and that it is hoped that, at its next session, the Indiana legislature 
will increase the salaries above those prescribed by the present law. In 
British Columbia, where the minimum salary is $600, and in Germany, where 
the teacher is an honored civil servant, the salaries are paid by the Govern- 
ment from the general rates. Twenty years ago, when the condition of our 
now prosperous High Schools resembled the present condition of our rural 
Public Schools, and when the legislative grant was a far more important ele- 
ment in the annual expenditure than it now is, the Boards were compelled to 
expend in teachers' salaries at least the legislative grant and the county 
equivalent. And further, it is well known that the remarkable growth and 
exceptionally efficient condition of the High Schools are largely due to a 
system of Departmental coercion which has for years been strenuously 
applied. The Province is proud of the prosperity and efficiency of its High 
Schools ; no one now regrets the means taken to secure it. 

Anything that savours of coercion is naturally offensive to a free people ; 
but British subjects have always been law-abiding when their reason has 
been convinced. When Dr. Ryerson succeeded in making the Public Schools 
free, he encountered for a time, the bitterest opposition, and then also the 
opponents of the reform cried " Coercion." No one now doubts the wisdom 
of his course. There has, it is true, been some opposition to the minimum 
salary scheme of the present governmnet, but it is to the credit of the people 
that it has been comparatively slight, and chiefly where the scheme and its 
causes have not been understood. Reports from inspectors are, with few ex- 
ceptions, decidedly favourable; and the following from an inspector who has 
experienced some opposition, may be taken as an evidence of the general 
situation : — 

"The beneficial effects of the recent School amendments are felt even 
now : 

(a) More Normal trained teachers have been engaged since midsummer 
in this inspectorate than ever before. 

(b) For the first time in the history of the Townships none but Normal 
trained teachers have been employed. 

(c) Many teachers, natives of the county, are coming home to teach 
from tKe west, owing to the prospect of fair salaries. 



I 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 181 



(d) Schools that have always engaged a cheap teacher, who was usually 
a poor teacher, are now engaging Normal trained teachers at a fair salary. 

(e) There are about ninety students in training at the Model Schools in 
th'e county. About thirty or forty of them are young men. 

The most pleasing feature to me is this : — I have some excellent teachers 
in poor school houses. Before this law was passed, had the Trustees offered 
to build a new school house, the people of the section would have brought 
such pressure to bear on them that they would have had to engage a cheap 
teacher until the school house was paid for. Now they can build and retain 
a good teacher. I am getting four new school houses already and expect 
three more." 

I now commend to the earnest consideration of the Province the scheme 
above set forth for the improvement of our Public Schools, as being an 
equitable and workable solution of a difficult problem. Experience will, no 
doubt, show where amendments may be made, and I shall be glad to receive 
suggestions on the subject. It is, however, only reasonable that a fair trial 
should be given a solution which meets our most pressing difficulties and 
which has been well received by Educationalists and by the general public. 
November, 1906. 



TRAVELLING LIBRARIES. 

Regulations. 

1. On satisfactory guarantee that all regulations will be complied with, 
Travelling Libraries may be lent to small Public Libraries. 

2. The Library Board must be personally responsible for loss or injury 
beyond reasonable wear. 

3. Books (only one case at a time) will be loaned without charge excepting 
the payment of damages for loss or injury to books beyond reasonable wear. 
The charges for transportation from the Education Department, or from the 
Public Library from which the Travelling Library may be shipped, are to 
be paid by the borrowing library, but charges for returning the books to 
Toronto are to be paid by the Department. 

4. The Travelling Library shall not be kept longer than three months 
after its reception, except by special permission from the Minister of Educa- 
tion. 

5. The Librarian shall care for the books while under his control, circu- 
late them in accordance with the Regulations of the Department and the 
Rules of the Library, and make required reports respecting their use. 

6. The books will be carefully selected for each Travelling Library, but 
the Department will not undertake to furnish other books than those forming 
each library collection. 

7. So far as possible the works of standard authors will be selected, 
including books of natural and social science, biography, history and travel, 
in addition to a moderate proportion of fiction. 

8. The Library shall be open for obtaining and returning books at such 
times as the Library Board shall direct. 

9. The Library Board may require each borrower to pay promptly any 
fines due for overdetention of books, or for injuries of any kind beyond reason- 
able wear to any book charged to him. 

10. All corrections of the text, or marks of any kind on books belonging 
to the Travelling Library are unconditionally forbidden, and all losses or 



182 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



injuries beyond reasonable wear must be propmtly adjusted to the satisfac- 
tion of the Trustee by the person to whom the book is charged. 
November, 1906. 



Duties of the Registrar. 

1. The Registrar of the Advisory Council shall preside, as Chairman, 
at all meetings of the Board of Examiners, or of any committee thereof, and 
shall furnish all necessary information. All cases of dispute at meetings of 
the Board or its committees shall be settled by a majority of the Examiners. 
In case of a tie the Chairman shall have the casting vote. 

2. During the reading of the answer papers the Registrar shall see that 
the instructions to Associate Examiners hereinafter outlined are observed; 
and, except where it is in his judgment absolutely necessary to disclose the 
candidate's name or examination centre, he shall so deal with all correspond- 
ence that the identity of the candidates shall be disclosed to neither the Ex- 
aminers nor the members of the Advisory Council. He shall assign a pseu- 
donym to each Associate Examiner and shall have power, in case of necessity, 
to transfer Associate Examiners from one section to another. 

3. He shall exercise a general supervision over the printing and dis- 
tribution of the question papers, and over the sorting, numbering and other- 
wise preparing the envelopes containing the answers, so that the answers 
may be conveniently read by the Examiners and Associate Examiners; he 
shall have charge of the reading of the answer papers, and, after the read- 
ing, he shall superintend the entering of the marks in the books by the clerks 
of the Department and the preparation of the results so that they may clearly 
indicate the subjects in which the condidates have passed or failed. 

4. He shall take the necessary steps in order that appeals may be read 
as speedily as possible. 

Duties of Examiners. 

5. Each Examiner shall be required to discharge all duties pertaining to 
his office, and no duty which an Examiner is appointed to perform shall be 
delegated to another Examiner without the approval of the Advisory Coun- 
cil. Each Examiner shall prepare the examination papers assigned to him 
within the limits of the courses of study for which they are prescribed, and 
of the authorized text-books. 

6. The papers set for the Part II. Junior Teachers' and the Senior Teach- 
ers' examinations shall be prepared in accordance with the requirements of 
candidates desiring to become teachers. 

7. In the prose composition papers in Classics and Modern Languages 
the vocabulary required shall be such as is found in the prescribed portion 
of text and text-book. 

8. Each paper in a department shall be signed by each Examiner in 
the department, and shall be approved by all the Examiners in the depart- 
ment at a meeting held for the purpose before it is submitted to the Board 
of Examiners for consideration. 

9. The Examiners, in the case of the Junior and Senior Teachers' and 
the Junior Matriculation Examinations, shall be present at the beginning of 
reading of the answer papers. Each Examiner shall discuss with the Asso- 
ciate Examiners in his section the character of the answers required by the 
question, and especially the value of incomplete or imperfect answers, so as 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 183 



to insure, as far as possible, uniform marking. In eases of differences of 
opinion on any point the decision of the Examiners shall be final; and, with- 
out the consent of the Examiner concerned, no Associate Examiner shall set 
aside any part of the agreement made as the result of this discussion. Any 
additional necessary allowance shall be made by the Revising Board on the 
report of the chairman of the section through the Registrar. 

10. Such of the Examiners as may be appointed a Revising Board by 
the Advisory Council shall, after due consideration of all doubtful and spe- 
cial cases, make such reports as will enable the advisory Council to settle the 
results of the examinations. 

11. With such Associate Examiners as may be appointed by the Advisory 
Council, the Examiners shall also read the appeals and make, through the 
Revising Board, such reports as are provided for in 10 above. 

12. The Examiners shall report to the Advisory Council the pseudonyms 
)f all Associate Examiners whose work appears to have been performed with 
marked carelessness or incapacity, or who have shown any substantial dis- 
regard of the instructions of the Advisory Council. 

Duties of Associate Examiners. 

13. The Associate Examiners shall be classified into sections according 
to the subjects of examination, and a chairman shall be appointed in each 
section by the Registrar. The chairman of each section shall have a general 
oversight of the work done in his section, and shall see that the regulations 
are carried out anxl that tJic marling is uniform. He shall also report to the 
Revising Board, through the Registrar, any matters that require its atten- 
tion. In the case of an emergency, as in the absence of a chairman of a 
section, the Registrar shall appoint a chairman pro tempore. 

14. An Associate Examiner shall not have in hand more than ten papers 
at one time, nor shall he have more than one envelope open upon his table at 
one time, and he shall return each examination book to its proper envelope. 
As soon as an examination book is removed from its envelope the candidate's 
number shall be placed on the front page of the book. The envelopes, with 
their enclosures, must be returned in numerical order in which they are 
received. In cases of suspected copying the Associate Examiner shall note 

on the face of the envelope, "Copying, see No , question ," 

and through the chairman of the section report the case at once to the Regis- 
trar. In such cases the Associate Examiner and the chairman of the section 
shall make a detailed report of the grounds of suspicion. 

15. In the case of the papers in English Grammar, Literature, and Com- 
position, one mark shall be deducted for each mis-spelt word and one mark 
for each instance of incorrect English. At all examinations in Arithmetic, 
either arithmetical or algebraical solutions should be accepted. 

16. In reading the answer papers each Associate Examiner shall mark 
distinctly in the left hand margin the value assigned by him to each answer 
or partial answer, shall place the total on each page at the foot of the margin 
and enter this total at the top of the next page ; he shall place the result on 
the face of the envelope, indicating in the case of the papers in English 
Grammar, Literature and Composition, the deduction for mis-spelt words 
and incorrect English thereon, thus, e.g., Grammar, 80 — 2 sp. — 4 f.s. — 74. 
He shall also sign his pseudonym on the envelope of each examination book 
examined. 

17. Associate Eaxminers shall be in their respective places so that the 
reading may commence promptly at the time specified, viz., 9 a.m. and 2 



184 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



p.m., and no Associate Examiner shall stop work before the hours of closing, 
viz., 12 noon and 5 p.m., without reporting to the chairman of the section 
and obtaining his consent. 

18. Associate Examiners shall refrain from all unnecessary conversation 
or other causes of disturbance and shall devote themselves strictly to the 
work of the examination; they shall keep a record of the papers read each 
day and shall report the results of their work to the chairman of their respec- 
tive sections. 

19. They shall not at any time enter the rooms of other sections unless 
when it is necessary to do so in entering or leaving their own rooms, or when 
the sanction of the Registrar has been obtained. 

20. The work is confidential throughout. Should the identity of an ex- 
amination centre or of any particular candidate be discovered by an Asso- 
ciate Examiner he shall report the fact without any delay to the Registrar, 
or, in his absence, to the clerk of committees, who shall change the Associate 
Examiner, or make such other arrangements as he may deem expedient. 

21. The instructions herein contained so far as they relate to the exami- 
nations of the Education Department and matriculation into the University 
6hall be subject to amendment from time to time with the approval of the 
Education Department and of the Senate of the University of Toronto. 

November, 1906. 



II. — Orders in Council. 

Professor Guy de 'Lestard appointed temporarily to the position of 
French Teacher at the Toronto Model School. Approved 5th January, 1906. 

Mr. Arthur Hugh Urquhart Colquhoun, B.A., appointed Deputy Minis- 
ter of Education, said appointment to take effect on and from the 6th day of 
February, 1906. Approved 7th February, 1906. 

Subject to the requirements of the Regulations, High School established 
in the Town of Wingham. Approved 7th February, 1906. 

Miss Priscella H. Bayfield granted a certificate as Director of Kindergar- 
ten Schools. Approved 21st February, 1906. 

Mr. Patrick W. Bartley, B.A., of the Royal University of Dublin, Ire- 
land, granted an Interim Second Class Certificate. Approved 20th April, 
1906. 

Following persons appointed to the regular staff of the Education De- 
partment : 

Mr. Norman Brown, Junior Clerk. 

Mr. George Lyons, Messenger. 

Miss E. Dennis, Stenographer to the Minister of Education. 

Miss Myrtle Gregg, Stenographer to the Deputy Minister. 

Miss E. King, Stenographer, Departmental Library. 

Mr. W. A. Poole, Guard in Museum. 

Approved 18th May, 1906. 

Mr. John Seath, M.A., LL.D., appointed Superintendent of Education, 
said appointment to take effect on and from 25th dav of May, 1906. Approv- 
ed 26th May, 1906. 

Subject to the requirements of the Regulations, High School established 
in the Town of Penetanaruishene. Approved 28th May, 1906. 

Mr. James Elgin Wetherell, M.A., appointed Inspector of High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes, said appointment to take effect on and from the 
15th day of , September, 1906. Approved 28th May, 1906. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 185 



Ten graduates of the Lillian Massey School of Household Science grant- 
ed certificates of qualification as teachers of Household Science in the Public 
and High Schools. Approved 4th June, 1906. 

Mr. Clarkson W. James, Clerk and Private Secretary to the Minister 
of Education, appointed Secretary to Department of Education. Approved 
15th June, 1906. 

Miss Luella E. J. Fear, a graduate in Domestic Science of the Ontario 
Ladies' College, Whitby, granted a certificate of qualification as a teacher of 
Household Science in the Public and High Schools. Approved 15th June 
1906. 

Mr. Thos. David Allingham granted a temporary certificate as Principal 
valid for two years in the Penetanguishene High School. Approved 20th 
June, 1906. 

Mr. Henry Byron Spotton, M.A., appointed Inspector of High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes, said appointment to take effect from the 15h day of 
September, 1906. Approved 20th June, 1906. 

Mr. T. W. Crothers, Barrister-at-Law, St. Thomas, and Mr. John A. 
Cooper, Journalist, Toronto, appointed Commissioners to enquire into and re- 
port upon the reasonableness of the present prices of the School Text Books 
now on the authorized list and to enquire also into the prices of such publica- 
tions elsewhere. Approved 30th June, 1906. 

Mr. Robert H. Cowley, B.A., appointed Inspector of Continuation 
Classes. Approved 30th June, 1906. 

Regulations for the accommodation and equipment of Rural Public 
and Separate Schools. Approved 13th July, 1906. 

Miss iViary Adele Ashall, appointed to the staff of Education. Department. 
Approved 13th July, 1906. 

Following appointments made to the Ontario Normal College for the ses- 
sion 1906-1907 : 

Mr. R. A. Thompson, B.A., Acting Principal. 

Professor Albert H. Abbott, B.A., Ph.D., Lecturer in Psychology. 

Professor F. Tracy, B.A., Ph.D., Lecturer in Science and History of 
Education. 

Approved 13th July, 1906. 

A Normal School was established in each of the cities of Hamilton, Strat- 
ford, and Peterborough, and in the Town of North Bay, conditionally in each 
case that a proper site for the same be furnished by the municipalitv. Ap- 
proved 16th July, 1906. 

Mr. George Lynch Staunton, K.C., Hamilton, appointed Legal Counsel 
to the Commission lately appointed to inquire into and report regarding the 
prices of Text Books. Approved 16th July, 1906. 

Mr. Alexander Clark Casselman, appointed Secretary to the Text Book 
Commission. Approved 16th July, 1906. 

Mr. John Baxter Johnston, M.A., Glasgow University, Scotland, grant- 
ed Interim Second Class Certificate. Approved 7th September, 1906. 

Mr. Alexander John Russell Snow, Barrister-at-Law, appointed a Com- 
missioner to investigate the workings of the Institution for the Blind, at 
Brantford, and the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, at Belleville. Ap- 
proved 5th October, 1906. 

Mr. Charles Bernard Coughlin, M.D., appointed Superintendent and 
Principal of the Institution for the Deaf and Dumb at Belleville, said ap. 
pointment to take effect on and from 15th November, 1906. Approved 20th 
October, 1906. 

Regulations regarding the Senior Teachers' Examination approved 24th 
October, 1906. 



186 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Miss Susie Bawden, granted a certificate as a teacher of Household Sci- 
ence. Approved 24th October, 1906. 

Regulations regarding County Model Schools approved 24th October, 
1906. 

Mr. John Eastwood Hodgson, M.A., of the University of Toronto, grant- 
ed a High School Principal's certificate with Specialist standing in Classics 
and English. Approved 5th November, 1906. 

Miss Marguerite Eliot, appointed Assistant in the Boys' Model School 
at Ottawa, said appointment to take effect from 1st November, 1906. Ap- 
proved 9th November, 1906. 

Mr. J. Ball Dow, School Trustee, Whitby, and Mr. John H. Langton, 
School Trustee, Parkhill, appointed members of the Advisory Council of Ed- 
ucation, as representing the School Trustees of the Province. Approved 7th 
December, 1906. 

Rev. W. J. Murphy, Rector of the Ottawa University, appointed as that 
body's representative on the Advisory Council of Education. Approved 7th 
December, 1906. 

Regulations respecting Public Libraries, Reading Rooms, and Travel- 
ling Libraries approved 14th December, 1906. 

Miss Esther L. Ryan, B.A., McGill University, granted an Interim Sec- 
ond Class certificate. Approved 14th December, 1906. 

Miss Alice Gertrude Steen, B.A., McGill University, granted an Inter- 
im Second Class certificate. Approved 14th December, 1906. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 187 



APPENDIX H.— PUBLIC LIBRARIES, LITERARY AND SCIEN- 
TIFIC INSTITUTIONS, ETC. 

Report of T. W. H. Leavitt, Inspector of Public Libraries, Scientific 
Institutions and Literary and Scientific Societies receiving a 
share of the legislative grant, in the province of ontario, for 
the Yeah Ending 31st December, 1905. 

To the Hon. B. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., Minister of Education for the 
Province of Ontario. 

I have the honour to submit herewith the report on the Public Libraries, 
Scientific Institutions and Literary and Scientific Societies receiving a share 
of the Legislative Grant for the year ending 31st December, 1905. 

The following Libraries were incorporated during the year : — 

Bath, Corkery, Fort William, Grafton, *Tweed. 

The following Libraries were closed : — 

Aberarder (books transferred to S. S. No. Id, Plympton), Hillsburg 
(books sold to pay liabilities), Inkerman (books transferred to S. S. No. 6, 
Mountain), Kearney (books transferred to Public School Trustees), Keswick 
(library closed), Morewood (books in care of Public School Trustees), Port 
Burwell (books transferred to S. S. No. 2, Bayham), Wolfe Island (books 
transferred to the Teachers' Association, County Frontenac). 

The following Libraries did not report for the year 1905: — 

Algonquin, Angus, Athens, Atwood,* Avonmore,* Baden, Bancroft, Bat- 
tersea. Bayham, Beeton, Belfountain, Berwick. Binbrook, Bloomfield, 
Brougham, Bruce Mines, Burford, Burritt's Rapids, Caistorville, Chelten- 
ham, Chepstow, Clarksburg, Claude, Colborne, Cold Springs, Coldstream, 
Cookstown, Copper Cliff, Crysler, Dalhousie, Dawson, Depot Harbor, Duart, 
Dufferin, Dundalk, Dundela, Elgin, Emsdale, Enterprise, Fenella, Finch, 
Flesherton, Floradale, Fordwich. Forks of the Credit, Freelton, Glen Allen, 
Glencoe, Gore Bay, Gorrie, Goular's Bay, Haileybury, Harrowsmith, Hast- 
ings, Havelock, Hepworth, Highgate, Holland Centre, Holyrood, Inglewood, 
Jasper, Kars, Kearns, Kinburn, Kintore, Lion's Head, Maberley, Maitland, 
Melancthon, Metcalfe, Molesworth, Mono Centre, Mono Mills, Moose Creek, 
Munster, Nairn Centre, North Augusta, Oil Springs, Ophir, Pakenham, 
Palmerston, Pelee Island, Perth, Poland, Port Dover, Powassan, Primrose, 
Ripley, Rosemont, Schreiber, Severn Bridge, Shallow Lake, Singhampton, 
Sprucedale, Sundridge, Tamworth, Thornton, Tiverton, Trenton, Tweed, 
Yandorf, Vars, Violet Hills, Watson's Corners, Webbwood, West Lome, 
Westport, Wyoming. 

I find that a practice has grown up among small Libraries of not making 
an Annual Report to this Department when said Libraries are not entitled to 
a Legislative Grant for the current year. The most effective method for term- 
inating the practice would be to pass a Regulation under which 5 per cent, of 



*K< -established. 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



the first grant payable to a Library, which had previously defaulted, should 
be deducted from the grant. I recommend that some action be taken which 
will terminate the abuse. 

The following table shows the locality of every Public and Free Library 
in the Province on the 1st December, 1906 : — 

Free and Public Libraries. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Addington Camden East. 

" Enterprise. 

" Napanee Mills (Strath- 

cona P. 0.) 
" Newburgh. 

" Tamworth. 

Yarker. 

Algoma Bruce Mines. 

" Chapleau. 

" Goulais Bay. 

" Marksville. 

" Nairn Centre. 

" Ophir. 

" Port Arthur. 

" Rat Portage (Kenora). 

" Sault Ste. Marie. 

" Schrieber. 

" Thessalon. 

" Victoria Mines. 

" Webbwood. 

Brant Brantford. 

" Burford. 

" Glenmorris. 

" New Durham. 

Paris. 

" Scotland. 

" St. George. 

Bruce Bervie. 

Cargill. 

Chepstow. 

Chesley. 

Elmwood. 

Glamis. 

Hep worth . 

Holyrood. 

Kincardine. 

Lion's Head. 

Lucknow. 

Mildmay. 

Paisley. 

Pinkerton. 

Port Elgin. 

Ripley. 

Riversdale . 

Southampton . 

Teeswater. 

Tara. 

Tiverton. 

Underwood . 

Walkerton . 

Westwood. 

Wiarton. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Carleton Carp. 

Corkery. 

Dawson. 

Kars. 

Kinburn. 

" Manotick. 

Metcalfe. 

Munster. 

*' North Gower. 

Ottawa. 

Richmond. 

Dufferin Glen Cross. 

Grand Valley. 

Honey wood. 

" Melancthon. 

Mono Centre. 

Orangeville. 

Primrose. 

Rosemont. 

Shelburne. 

Violet Hill. 

Dundas Chesterville. 

" Dundela. 

" Iroquois. 

....Matilda (Iroquois P. 0.) 

" Morrisburg. 

" South Mountain. 

" Winchester. 

Durham Bowmanville. 

" Millbrook. 

Orono. 

Port Hope. 

Elgin Aylmer . 

" Bayham. 

" Dutton. 

" Port Stanley. 

" Rodney. 

" St. Thomas. 

" Shedden. 

" Sparta. 

" Springfield. 

" West Lome. 

Essex Amherstburg. 

" Comber. 

" Essex. 

" Harrow. 

" Kingsville. 

11 Leamington. 

" Pelee Island. 

" Walkerville. 

11 Windsor. 

Frontenac Battersea. 



Report since received. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



189 



Free and Public Libraries, — Continued. 



Counties and 




Counties and 




Districts. 


Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Districts. 


Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Frontenac .... 


....Garden Island. 


Hastings 


...Bancroft. 


tt 


...Harrowsmith. 


# 1 1 


...Belleville. 


tt 


...Kingston. 


1 1 


...Deseronto. 


tt 


...Mississippi. 


tt 


...Frankford. 


it 


...Sydenham. 


a 


...Madoc. 


Glengarry 
n 


...Lancaster. 


tt 


...Marlbank. 


...Maxville. 


tt 


...Stirling. 


tt 


...Williamstown. 


n 


...Trenton. 


Grenville 


. ...Burritt's Rapids. 


a 


...Tweed. 


tt 


....Cardinal. 


Huron 


...Auburn. 


" 


....Easton's Corners. 


a 


...Brucefield. 


it 


....Jasper. 


tt 


...Blyth. 


tt 


....Kemptville. 


a 


...Brussels. 


" 


...Maitland. 


it 


...Clinton. 


(i 


...Merrickville. 


tt 


...Dungannon. 


tt 


...North Augusta. 


tt 


...Ethel. 


a 


...Oxford Mills. 


" 


...Exeter. 


" 


...Prescott. 


tt 


...Fordwich. 


it 


....Spencerville. 


a 


...Goderich. 


Grey 


. ...Avton. 


a 


...Gorrie. 




t 


...Badjeros. 


ti 


...Hensall. 




i 


...Bognor. 


it 


...Molesworth. 




t 


...Chatsworth. 


tt 


...Seaforth. 




i 


....Clarksburg. 


n 


...St. Helen's. 




t 


. ...Dromore. 


a 


...Walton. 




i 


...Durham. 


a 


...Wingham. 




a 


. ...Dundalk. 


tt 


...Wroxeter. 



Flesherton. 

Holland Centre. 

Holstein. 

Kemble. 

Hanover. 

Lake Charles. 

Markdale. 

Meaford. 

Maxwell and Feversham. 

Owen Sound. 

Priceville. 

Shallow Lake. 

Singhampton. 

Thornbury . 

Haliburton Haliburton. 

" Minden. 

Haldimand Caledonia. 

Canfield. 

" Cayuga. 

" Cheapside. 

" Dufferin (Clanbrassil 

Dunnville. [P. 0.) 

Hagersville. 

" Jarvis. 

" Nanticoke. 

Victoria (Caledonia Pi,0.) 

York. 

Halton .....Acton. 

" Burlington. 

" Georgetown. 

" Milton. 

" Oakville. 



Kent Blenheim. 

" Bothwell. 

" Chatham. 

" Dresden. 

" Duart. 

" Highgate. 

" Tilbury. 

" Ridgetown. 

" Romney. 

" Thamesville. 

11 Wallaceburg. 

" Wheatley. 

Lambton Arkona. 

" Alvinston. 

" Brigden. 

" Bunyan. 

" Copleston. 

" Forest. 

" Inwood. 

" Oil Springs. 

" Petrolea. 

" ' Point Edward. 

" Sarnia. 

" Thedford. 

" Watford. 

" Wyoming. 

Lanark Allan's Mills. 

" Almonte. 

" Carleton Place. 

" Dalhousie. 

Elphin. 

" Lanark. 



190 



THE REPORT OE THE 



I* 



Frke and Public Libraries. — Continued. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Lanark Maberley. 

" Middleville. 

" Pakenham. 

Perth. 

Poland. 

Smith's Falls. 

" Watson's Corners. 

Leeds Addison . 

" Athens. 

" Brockville. 

" Elgin. 

" Gananoque. 

" Mallorytown. 

" Newboro'. 

" Westport. 

Lennox Odessa. 

" Bath. 

" Napanee. 

Lincoln Abingdon. 

" ...Beamsville. 

" Caistorville. 

" Grantham (St. Catharines 

" Merritton. [P. O.) 

'■ Grimsby. 

" Niagara. 

Smithville. 

" St. Catharines. 

Manitoulin Cockburn Island. 

" Gore Bay. 

Little Current. 

" Manitowaning. 

Middlesex Ailsa Craig. 

" Belmont. 

" Coldstream. 

" Dorchester. 

" Glencoe. 

" Komoka. 

London. 

Lucan. 

" Melbourne. 

" Mt. Brydges. 

Newbury. 

......... Parkhill. 

" Strathroy. 

Wardsville. 

Muskoka Bracebridge. 

BaySville. 

Gravenhurst. 

Huntsville. 

Port Carling. 

Severn Bridge. 

Nipissing Copper Cliff. 

Haileybu'ry. 

Kerns (Milberta P. O.) 

" North Bay. 

" Sturgeon Falls. 

Thorndoe. 

Norfolk Bloomsburg. 

" Delhi. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Norfolk Port Dover. 

Port Rowan. 

" Simcoe. 

" Waterford. 

Norhumberland Brighton. 

Campbellford. 

Cobourg. 

Cold Springs. 

Colborne. 

Fenella. 

Gore's Landing. 

Grafton. 

Warkworth. 

Ontario Beaverton. 

" Brooklin. 

" Brougham. 

" Cannington. 

" Claremont. 

" Oshawa. 

" Pickering. 

" Port Perry. 

" Sunderland. 

" Uxbridge. 

" Whitby. 

" Zephyr. 

Oxford Beachville. 

" ,...Drumbo. 

" Embro. 

" Harrington. 

" Ingersoll. 

Kintore. 

Plattsville. 

" Norwich. 

Otterville. 

" Princeton. 

Tavistock. 

" Tillsonburg. 

" Thamesford. 

" Woodstock. 

Parry Sound ...Burk's Falls. 
" . .Callender. 

" ...Depot Harbor. 

" ...Emsdale. 

" ...Parry Sound. 

" ...Powassan. 

" ...Rosseau. 

" ...South River. 

" ...Sprucedale. 

" ...Sundridge. 

...Trout Creek. 

Peel Alton. 

Belfountain. 

Bolton. 

Brampton. 

Caledon. 

Cheltenham. 

Claude. 

Forks of the Credit. 

Tnglewood. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



191 



Free and Public Libraries. — Continued. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 

Peel Lome Park. 

" Mono Road. 

" Mono Mills. 

" Port Credit. 

" Streetsville. 

Perth Atwood. 

" Listowel. 

Milverton. 

" Monkton. 

" Mitchell. 

" Shakespeare . 

" St. Mary's. 

" Stratford. 

Peterborough ...Hastings. 
" ...Havelock. 

" ...Lakefield. 

" ...Norwood. 

...Peterborough. 

Prescott Hawkesbury. 

, " Vankleek Hill. 

Prince Edward Bloomfield. 

" Picton. 

Rainy River ...Dryden 

...Fort Frances. 

Renfrew Admaston. 

" Anrprior. 

Burnstown. 

Cobden. 

" Douglas. 

" Forester's Falls. 

Pembroke. 

" Renfrew. 

White Lake. 

Russell Russell. 

" Vars. 

Stormont Avonmore. 

Berwick. 

" Cornwall. 

Crysler. 

Finch. 

Moose Creek. 

Newington. 

Wales. • 

Simcoe Alliston. 

" Angus. 

" Barrie. 

" Beeton. 

" Bradford. 

" Coldwater. 

" Collingwood. 

" Cookstown. 

" Creemore. 

" Elmvale. 

" Hillsdale. 

" Lefroy. 

" ....Midland. 

" Orillia. 

" Penetanguishene. 

" Stayner. 



Counties and 

Districts. Cities, Towns and Villages. 



Simcoe Sunnidale (New Lowell 

Thornton. [P.O.) 

" Tottenham. 

Thunder Bay ...Fort William. 

Victoria Bobcaygeon. 

Cambray. 

Fenelon Falls. 

Kinmount. 

Kirkfield. 

Little Britain. 

Lindsay. 

Manilla. 

Norland. 

Oak wood. 

Omemee. 

Woodville. 

Waterloo Ayr. 

Baden. 

Berlin. 

Elmira. 

Floradale. 

Gait. 

Hawkesville. 

Hespeler. 

Linwood. 

New Dundee. 

New Hamburg. 

Preston. 

Waterloo. 

Wellesley. 

Welland Bridgeburg. 

Fonthill. 

Fort Erie. 

" Niagara Falls. 

" Niagara Falls South. 

Port Colborne. 

Ridgeway. 

Thorold. 

Welland. 

Wellington Alma. 

Arthur. 

" Belwood. 

CKfford. 

Drayton. 

Flora. 

Erin. 

Ennotville. 

" Fergus. 

Glen Allan. 

Guelph. 

Harriston. 

" Morriston. 

il Mount Forest. 

" Palmerston. 

Rock wood . 

Speedside. 

Wentworth Ancaster. 

" Binbrook. 

Dundas. 



192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Free I and Public Libraries.— Concluded. 



Counties and 






Counties and 




Districts. 


Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Districts. 


Cities, Towns and Villages. 


Wentworth . . 


....Freelton. 




York 


..Schomberg. 


it 


....Hamilton. 






..Stouffville. 


n 


...Mill Grove. 






..Thornhill. 


a 


....Lynden. 






..Toronto. 


n 


...Saltfleet (Stony Creek 




..Toronto Junction. 


(t 


...Waterdown. 


[P. 0.) 




..Unionville. 


York 


....Aurora. 






..Vandorf. 






...Bracondale. 






..Weston. 






...Deer Park. 






..Woodbridge. 






...Don. 












...East Toronto. 




The above list may be classified as fol- 






...Highland Creek. 




lows : — 








...Islington. 












...King. 




Public Libraries reporting 242 






...Maple. 




Free Libraries 


reporting 134 






...Markham. 




Public Libraries not reporting 92 






...Mount Albert. 




Free Libraries 


not reporting 16 






...Newmarket. 




Public Libraries incorporated since 






...Queensville. 




1st December, 1905 4 






...Richmond Hill. 




Totals .. 








...Scarboro'. 


488 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 193 



I. PUBLIC LIBRARIES (NOT FREE). 

The following extracts are taken from the annual reports for the year 
ending 31st December, 1905. (For details see Table A). 

1. Classification of Public Libraries Reporting. 

Public Libraries with reading rooms 83 

Public Libraries without reading rooms 159 

Total 243 

2. Public Libraries — Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total receipts of 242 Public Libraries was $53,085 17 

Balances on hand 5,910 94 

3. Public Libraries — Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 242 Public Libraries was $47,174 23 

4. Public Libraries — Assets and Liabilities. 

Assets of 242 Public Libraries $373,468 51 

Liabilities of 242 Public Libraries 6,640 91 

5. Number of Members in Public Libraries. 

242 Public Libraries have 28,748 members. 

6. No. of Volumes in Public Libraries and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 242 Libraries 473,160 

Number of volumes issued in 242 Libraries 673,958 

7. Reading Rooms in Public Libraries. 

83 Public Libraries reported having reading rooms. 

16 Libraries reported having periodicals for circulation. 

99 Libraries subscribed for 1,899 newspapers and periodicals. 



13 E. 



194 



THE REPORT OE THE 



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196 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 201 

II. PUBLIC LIBRARIES, FREE. 

The following extracts are taken from the annual reports for the year 
ending 31st December, 1905. (For details see Table B). 

1. Classification of Free Libraries Reporting. 

Free Libraries, with reading rooms 91 

Free Libraries, without reading rooms 43 

Total 134 

2. Free Libraries — Receipts and Balances on Hand. 

The total receipts of 134 Free Libraries was $174,323 66 

Balances on hand 22,819 34 

3. Free Libraries — Expenditure. 

The total expenditure of 134 Free Libraries was $151,504 32 

4. Free Libraries — Assets and Liabilities. 

Assets of 134 Free Libraries $1,223,171 89 

Liabilities of 134 Free Libraries 129,626 19 

5. Number of Readers in Free Libraries. 
134 Free Libraries report having had 124,159 readers. 

6. No. of Volumes in Free Libraries, and No. of Volumes Issued. 

Number of volumes in 134 Free Libraries 684,539 

Number of volumes issued in 134 Free Libraries 1,807,122 

7. Reading Rooms in Free Libraries. 

91 Free Libraries reported having reading rooms. 

96 Free Libraries subscribed for 4,319 newspapers and periodicals. 



202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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206 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Ontario Society of Artists, 

During the year six exhibitions were held in the galleries of the Society 
and five new names were added to the list of members. From designs fur- 
nished by the Society a new art gallery has been erected, larger and better 
than any previously existing in the Province. 

The Annual Exhibition of the Society was opened by His Honour W. 
Mortimer Clark, K.C., Lt. -Governor. There were 151 works shown. 

The following pictures were chosen by the Society for the Ontario col- 
lection in accordance with the f 200 grant from the Ontario Government : 

No. 117, "The Passing of an Autumn Day," H. Spiers. 

No. 124, "A Quiet Afternoon, Beaupre," Gertrude E. Spurr. 

The grant from the Ontario Government of |800 was spent in the pur- 
chase of the following pictures selected by the Guild of Civic Art : 

"In the Meadow," J. W. Beatty, |175. 
Storm Bound," F. McG. Knowles, |175. 



"Reverie," G. A. Reid, |150. 



"Evening," Mrs. M. H. Reid, $175. 

"Winter Landscape," O. P. Staples, $75. 

"Yellow Water Lilies," Miss M. E. Wrinch, $50. 

One of the most important events of the year was the opening of the new 
art gallery in connection with the Canadian National Exhibition. The col- 
lection of 278 pictures was of exceptional interest, including the works of 
many distinguished European painters. 

During the year the Society's gallery has been used for several import- 
ant exhibitions : 

The Royal Canadian Gallery of Arts. 

Architectural Eighteen Club. 

The Light of the World, by Holman Hunt, 

Abbey's Coronation Picture. Applied Arts Exhibition. 

The Huron Institute, Colling wood. 

During the year twelve meetings of the Executive Committee and eight 
regular meetings of the Institute were held. 

The following lectures were delivered : 

The Tooth of Time. Professor Coleman. 

The Early Indians of this Section. J. Hugh Hammond. 

The Forestry Problem. Mr. E. Stewart. 

The Fenian Raid. Col. Cruikshank. 

The Petun Indians. Major G. W. Bruce. 

Owing to the untiring energy of the Curator of the Museum, Mr. C. E« 
Freer, a large number of new exhibits have been secured. 

Hamilton Scientific Association. 

The General Association held ten meetings as follows: — 
Inaugural Address. Geo. L. Johnson, B.A., President. 
Rivers of Canada. Professor Coleman. 
Churches of France. Professor Squair. 
Immunity. Dr. J. Edgar Davy. 

Labrador Eclipse Expedition. Rev. D. B. Marsh, F.R.A.S., and G. P. 
Jenkins, F.R.A.S. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 207 



Archaeology and the Origin of the Hebrew People. Rev. Logie, M. C, 
Donnel, M.A. 

Progress of Photography. James Gadsby, P.C.S. 

From Prince Albert to Port Churchill. J. W. Tyrrell, C.E.D., L.S. 

Vacation Rambles in the Old Land. P. L. Scrivin, T.H.S.A. 

During the Session twenty new members were added. 

Five Honorary Members have been added, including E. W. Maunder, 
F.R.A.S., Greenwich Observatory; Mrs. Maunder; Dr. Grenfell, M.R.C.S., 
Labrador; W. F. King, B.A. LL.D., Ottawa; and Professor Brazier, Alle- 
ghany, Pa. 

Dr. Fletcher, of Ottawa, was chosen to represent the Association at the 
meeting of the Royal Society at Ottawa. 

The museum has been re-arranged and the seating room much improved. 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club. 

Programme of Winter Soirees, 1905-6. 
President's Address and Report. 
Address by Dr. J. F. White. 

Illustrated Lecture. Apparent Consciousness in Plants and Animals. 
Dr. S. B. Sinclair. 

Illustrated Lecture. The Geology of Strathcona Park and other Otta- 
wa localities. Dr. H. M. Ami. 

Report of Geological Branch. W. J. Wilson, Ph.B. 
The Migration of Birds. C. W. G. Eifrig. Illustrated by Specimens. 
Report on the Ornithological Branch. Mr. A. G. Kingston. 
Illustrated Lecture. Trees, Shrubs, and Plants for the adornment of 
Home. Dr. W. Saunders. 

Conversational Evening : — 

Prof. J. Macoun. Botany. 

Dr. J. Fletcher. Collection of Insects for Schools. 

Dr. Otto Klotz. Gravity. 

Dr. H. M. Ami. Methods of Work of the Ottawa Field-Naturalists 5 

Club. Illustrated by lantern views. 
Fish Culture. Prof. E. E. Prince. Illustrated. 
Annual Meeting. 
Address by Mr. A Gibson. Method of Studying Insects followed at the 
Experimental Farm. 

The above programme was carried out with some slight changes in dates. 

Excursions. 

Sub-excursions were held during the Spring and early Summer to locali- 
ties near Ottawa. General excursions were held to Chelsea and Carp. The 
Chelsea excursion was attended by members of the Royal Society and also by 
members of the Carleton County Teachers' Association. Addresses were de- 
livered by Drs. C. F. Hodge, Clark University, Dr. A. H. MacKay, Supt. 
Education, Nova Scotia, and Dr. G. U. Hay, Editor Educational Review. 

The Ottawa Naturalist, the official organ of the Club, has during the 
year contained 249 pages of letter press and four engravings. This publi- 
cation deserves the highest commendation and should receive more general 
support from the public. Some thirty articles on Nature Study have appeared 
during the past three years and 5,500 copies of each of these papers have been 
printed in pamphlet form and distributed throughout Canada, 



208 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Reports of Branches. 

The Entomological, the Geological, the Botanical, the Zoological and 
Ornithological Branches have done much scientific and practical work during 
the year. 

A Summer School for Teachers was held in Ottawa in July, 1905. Sev- 
eral members of the Club delivered lectures in thev Nature Study Course and 
also aided in the field work. 

The Scientific Society of the University of Ottawa. 

During the year the following lectures were delivered : — 
The Adulteration of Food. Mr. William Cavanagh. 
Patent Medicines. Rev. J. A. Lajeunesse. 
The Conservation of Energy. Mr. Charles Seguin. 
Reflection and Refraction of Light. Mr. William Derham. 
(Mr. James George demonstrated the laws explained in this lecture.) 
Prehistoric Man. Illustrated. Mr. George O'Toole. 
Mr. Thomas Tobin read an interesting paper on Subterranean Caverns. 
Laws of the Propagation of Sound. Mr. James George. 
Medical and Surgical Emergencies. Dr. D. M. McDougall. 
Deep Sea Life. Mr. James McNeill. 
Exercise and Training. Mr. Thomas Sloan. 

Mr. Thomas Callaghan read an interesting paper on Peat and Peat For- 
mations. 

Inventions of the 19th Century. Illustrated. Mr. G. Gormley. 

The Ottawa Literary and Scientific Society. 

The Society received a donation of $200.00 from Mr. John Manuel, a 
Life Member. A considerable portion of the gift has been expended upon 
the library. The report of the librarian shows that 233 volumes were placed 
on the shelves, of which 190 volumes were additions to the catalogue. The 
percentage of fiction taken from the library shows a slight decrease. 

The following lectures were delivered : — 

Tolestoy and His Message. E. H. Crosby. 

Before Port Arthur. W. Richmond Smith. 

Jerusalem, Illustrated. J. S. Ewart, K.C. 

The Canadian Militia under the French Regime. Benjamin Suite, 
F.R.S.C. 

The Genius of English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh Song. Prof. E. E. 
Prince, F.R.S.C, (with musical illustrations). 

Place of Defence in Canadian National Life. C. F. Hamilton, M.A. 

Scandinavia Revisited. Thos. Macfarcane, F.R.S.C, (musical illus- 
trations). 

The Southern Trail in British Columbia. J. M. Macoun. 

L'Institut Canadien Francais d' Ottawa. 

During the year the following public lectures were given : 

French-Canadian Institutions. Dr. J. K. Foran. 

Hygiene of the Mouth. Dr. R. Ohevier. 

Origin of names of Canadian Families. Rev. P. Lejune, O.M.I. 

Geology of Ottawa and Surroundings. Dr. Ami. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 209 



The North West and its Resources. Mr. Cyr, M.P. 

French Castles and their legends. Mr. N. Champagne. 

Experiences of a Trip around the World. Mr. Chanoyne. 

The Law applied to Domestic Relations. J. M. McDougall, K.C. 

The Influence of Education. Rev. Abbe Corbeil. 

The Yukon, its wonders and resources. A. T. Genest, C.E. 

In addition to the lectures a series of Scientific Courses was inaugurated 
at which the attendance exceeded the most sanguine expectations. 

A large number of books destroyed by fire some time ago have been re- 
placed. 

St. Patrick's Literary and Scientific Association. 

During the season the following addresses were delivered: — 

A Tour through England, Ireland and Scotland. Dr. J. R. O'Brien. 

O'Connell and his Times. Rev. Father Harty. 

The Arctic Regions. Captain Bernier. 

The Irish Race and Education. Dr. Fallon. 

The Study of Languages. Rev. Dr. O'Boyle. 

Address. Hon. Dr. Charles Fitzpatrick. 

During the year 455 volumes were taken from the library. 

Canadian Institute. 

The librarian reports that the Institute has received during the year 80 
donations, and the number of exchanges and volumes loaned is 886. The 
number of scientific and learned societies with which the Institute exchangee 
publications is 554. From these have been received 2,443 publications. 

The Natural History Section reports that five meetings were held. 

The following papers and addresses were given :| — 

Heredity. Prof. Ramsay Wright. 

Micro-organisms in Milk. Dr. A. R. Abbott. 

A Talk on Carnations. Mr. J. H. Dunlop. 

Individuality of Trees. (Illustrated.) Mr. J. McPherson Ross. 

General Report. 

At the meetings held on Saturday evenings the following papers were 
read : — 

Lessons in Empire Building. Mr. R. E. Kingsford. 

Tropical Seas and African Ports. Prof. A. P. Coleman. 

The Supposed Masonic Stone from Annapolis. Mr. John Ross Robert- 
son. 

Demonstrations of Electro-Chemical Apparatus. Professors W. H. 
Ellis and T. R. Roseburgh. 

Physical and Chemical Character of Colloids. Prof. McCallum. 

A Winter in Athens. W. A. Kirkwood, B.A. 

Heat Engines. Prof. Angus. 

St. Colomba. By the President. 

The Microscopic Structures of Iron and Steel. Prof. J. Galbraith. 

Meteorological Conditions of the Past Winter. Mr. R. F. Stupart. 

Is Belief in a Glacial Period justified? H. De Q. Sewell, Esq. 

The San Francisco Earthquake and the Seismograph. Mr. R. F. Stu- 
part. 

14 ED. 



210 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The Beginnings of Imperialism. Prof. McCurdy. 

Microscopical Demonstrations of the changes of Colloids. Prof. Macal- 
lum. 

Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 

During the year twenty regular meetings were held. 
The following papers were presented : — 
The Astronomy of Tennyson. Mr. John A. Paterson 
Personal Profit from Astronomical Studies. Rev. Robert Atkinson. 
Lunar Photography. Rev. Dr. Marsh. . 

Trans-Pacific Longitude Determinations. By Dr. 0. J. Klotz and Mr. 
F W Werry, was given by the former. 

Visit to the South Sea Islands. Dr. Klotz. 

Some Achievements of 19th Century Astronomy. Mr. L. H. Graham. 

Causes of Weather Changes. Director Stupart. 

Variable Stars. Mr. J. Miller Barr. 

Binary Stars. Mr. A. F. Miller. 

Stellar Classification. Mr. W. B. Musson 

Stellar Legends of the North American Indians. Mr. J U Hamilton. 

Shape of the Earth. Mr. J. R. Collins and Professor Coleman. 

The Harvest Moon. Mr. J. E. Maybee. 

Alfred Russell Wallace, as to "Life in other Worlds. Professor 

Kirschmann. , _ . , ' -.. . „ ,, 

The total eclipse of Aug. 30th was the subject for discussion for three 

evenings. 

There were two open-air meetings with telescopes. 

In addition to the regular meetings the Society gave a series of eight 
public lectures. They were held in the Chemical Building and were by Pro- 
fessor De Lury. 

The Society of Chemical Industry. 

The following papers were read : — 

1905. 

Crystallization. Prof. J. H. Bowman. 

Chemical Industry in British Columbia. Prof. W. R. Lang. 

The Metric System. Mr. Dale. 

1906. 

Mineral Deposits at Cobalt. W. G. Miller, B.A., M.A., Sc. 
Chemical Patents. Mr. J. E. Maybee. 
A Talk on Foundry Chemistry. H. L. Bowers, B.S. 
Recent Investigations of Breakfast Foods. R. Harcourt, B.S.A. 
A Recording Calorimeter for Gas. J. W. Bam, B.A.Sc, and Mr. J. 
W. Batten. 

Wellington Field Naturalists' Club. 

During the year meetings were held every two weeks from Oct. 11th to 
April 11th. On an average two papers were presented at each meeting. 
Among the most valuable papers were : — 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 3211 



Leaf Colouration in Relation to Leaf -fall. Mr. E. Thompson. 

Botanical Trip through Bruce Peninsula. Mr. A. B. Klough. 

Some Insects of the Vicinity of Guelph. Mr. T. J. Moore. 

The Raccoon. Mr. V. W. Jackson. 

Some Common Sedges. Mr. A. B. Klough. 

The Genus Etheostoma in the River Speed. Mr. J. L. Beattie. 

Forestry Conditions in the North West. Mr. R. H. MacMillan. 

Aquaria. Mr. H. Hutt. 

Gall Insects. Mr. T. D. Jarvis. 

Some weaknesses in the Mutation Theory. Mr. A. B. Klough. 

Methods in Bacteriological Research. Mr. B. Barlow. 

In field work the migration of birds has been recorded and two species 
of birds added to the County list. 

The northern portion of the County has been explored botanically. 

The second number of the Ontario Natural Science Bulletin is in press. 

Copies of Bulletin No. 1 have been sent gratis to all Public Libraries 
making application for the same. 

Ontario Historical Society. 

The last annual meeting of the Ontario Historical Society was held in 
Collingwood, when the report of the Secretary showed a membership of 223 
elected, ex-officio 17, corresponding 7, honorary 7. 

The following local societies are affiliated : — York Pioneer and Historical 
Society, Lundy's Lane Historical Society, Thorold and Beaverdams His- 
torical Society, Niagara-on-the-Lake Historical Society, Women's Canadian 
Historical Society of Toronto, Elgin Historical Society and Scientific Insti- 
tute, Wentworth Historical Society, Women's Wentworth Historical Society, 
Norfolk Historical Society, London and Middlesex Historical Society, Lamb- 
ton Historical Society, Belleville and Bay of Quinte Historical Society, Peter- 
borough Historical Society, Victoria Historical Society, Ottawa Women's 
Canadian Historical Society, Bowmanville Women's Historical Society, 
United Empire Loyalists Association of Ontario (Head of the Lake Branch), 
Huron Institute, Cobourg and County of Northumberland Historical Society, 
Essex County Historical Society, Peel County Historical Society, Bruce 
County Historical Society, York Pioneer and Historical Society, Women's 
Elgin Auxiliary Historical Society. 

During the annual meeting the following papers were read : — 

Downfall of the Hurons. C. C. James, M.A. 

The Petun Indians. Major Bruce. 

The Nottawasaga Trail. G. K. Mills, B.A. 

Christian Island was visited by the members of the society and an 
address delivered by J. Birnie, K.C., entitled "The Last Stand of the 
Hurons." 

The Women's Canadian Historical Society. 

The membership now numbers nearly three hundred. 

The following papers were read : 

Canadian Magazines. Mrs. J. W. F. Harrison. 

A Colony of Emigres in Upper Canada, by Miss Textor, of Yale Uni- 
versity, read by Miss H. M. Hill. 

Reminiscences of Early Elections in Toronto. Miss Teefy. 

Extracts from a Toronto directory, 1834, with comments by the Secre- 
tary. 



212 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The following series of papers on Newfoundland were also read : 

Discovery and Early History. Miss Sara Mickle. 

Occupation and Influence of the French Settlers. Miss M. A. Fitz- 
Gibbon, the paper supplemented by Miss Mickle. 

The History of St. John's, and the Climate and Resources of New- 
foundland. Miss C. Tocque. 

At the October meeting Mr. Hampden Burnham read a paper on Indian 
Women and their History. 

During the year the Society printed Transaction No. 5. It was com- 
posed of the following numbers : 

(I) Extracts from the Jarvis papers. 

1. Details of the capture of York. 

2. Account of the meeting of the Magistrates following the capture. 

3. General order. 

4. Account of Council held at Kingston. 

5. Letters, William Jarvis, etc. 

(II.) Plattsburg (1814), from the Diary of J. H. Wood. 
(III.) Extracts from papers of Captain H. Pringle. 
(IV.) Order concerning the presentation of King's Colors (1822). 
(V.) Papers concerning Rupert George, Captain of H.M.S. Hussar, 
1794. 

(VI.) Some U.E.L. Epitaphs. Sara Mickle. 
Several valuable donations were received. 

Niagara Historical Society. 

The Society reports eighteen new members for the year. 

Pamphlet number fourteen was published, being extracts from the 
Powell letters in the possession of Dr. James Bain, in the Public Library, 
Toronto. 

Over seven hundred copies of the publications issued by the Society were 
distributed to members and others. 

The President is preparing a catalogue fully classified. 

Plans are being formulated for the opening of the new building in pro- 
cess of erection. The date has been fixed for the Spring of 1907, after the 
opening of navigation. 

Six regular, one special and three Committee meetings were held 
during the year. 

Three papers were read by the President : ' 'Extract from the Powell 
letters, 1807-1821," "The origin of the Maple Leaf as the Emblem of Can- 
ada," "Sir Isaac Brock." 

The Memorial Hall promises to become the Mecca for Canadian his- 
torical students. The total amount subscribed was $3,580, of which $3,500 
have been paid. The tender for the erection of the Hall accepted was $4,100. 
The deficit has practically been met by Mr. Hugh J. Chisholm, of New 
York, an old Niagara boy, who generously sent his check for $500. 

The Esse j Historical Society. 

Papers were read by the Rev. Thomas Nattress and P. E. Panet. 

Mr. Solomon White read an interesting paper on Indian Treaties. 

Under the direction of the Executive the grave of Dr. Hume, one of 
the martyrs of the invasion of Windsor in 1838, was put in good condition, 
the masonry rebuilt and the lettering 1 re-cut. 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMP.NT. 213 



Arrangements have been made for the publication of the records of the 
parish of Assumption, Sandwich, for the first twenty-five years of its exist- 
ence, from 1767 to 1786. These records will appear in the annual volume of 
the Ontario Society. The records of the first fifty years of St. John's Church, 
Sandwich, will also appear in the same publication. 

London and Middlesex Historical Society. 

Ten regular monthly meetings were held. 

Three prizes for the best essays relating to the history of any township 
in the county were awarded. 

A committee has been appointed to select places for placing tablets of 
historic interest. 

The following papers were read : 

Prize essay, Township of Biddulph, by Mr. Revington. 

Origin of the names of the streets of London. Miss Priddis. 

Canadian Autonomy. Alex. Stuart, K.C. 

Points of interest visited in Great Britain with Canadian Manufactur- 
ers' Society. F. Lawson. 

Collection of Indian trophies found on the farm of Mr. Shaw-Wood. 
Dr. Wolverton. 

Illustrated description of Canadian Rockies. Frank Leonard. 

What became of the Indian Tribes of Western Ontario. Mr. Dearness. 

The following addresses were delivered : 

Interesting Features of Australia. Mr. Larke, Canadian Commissioner 
to Australia. 

History of Union Jack and Canadian Coat of Arms. Mr. Casselman. 

Cobalt, illustrated. Mr. Parkinson. 

Lundy's Lane Historical Society. 

During the past twenty years this society has done valuable pioneer 
work through its historical- publications. Including the many leaflets which 
have been printed from time to time, the total number of pages of strictly 
historical matter already published already exceeds four thousand. Col. 
Cruikshank reports that the material for Part VIII. of Documentary History 
is ready for the printer. It covers the closing months of 1813, and will con- 
clude this comprehensive and valuable work. 

During - the past year the Society issued an important work, "The Siege 
of Fort Erie," consisting of 52 pages, and covering the very important events 
relating to the struggle for the mastery of the last position held by the Ameri- 
can forces in Canada, and immediately preceding the close of the war of 
1812. 

The Executive has under consideration the publication of a folder show- 
ing the location, means of access, and story of each battlefield on the Niagara 
frontier. 

A large class of the Macdonald Institute's Department of Nature Study, 
under Professor McCready of the Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, 
visited Lundy's Lane, June 21st, where they were received by two members 
of the Society and given a description of the battle. 

The Society entertained the Ontario Historical Society at its last annual 
meeting, which was held jointly at Niagara Falls and Niagara-on-the-Lake. 
The battlefields of Chippawa and Lundy's Lane were visited. A public meet- 
ing was held in the evening in the Town Hall and was largely attended. 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE No - 12 



The Wentworth Historical Society. 

By resolution the Provincial Government was asked ^ «f a m onument 
to Lieut.-Col. the Hon. John McDonell, Attorney-General of the Proving 
and aide to Gen. Sir Isaac Brock; also a monument to the Indian Lniei le 

CUm The attention of the Society was called to the proposal of citizens .of the 
U. S. to raise the gunboats sunk in the Thames river near Chatham and 
remove them to Detroit. The proper authorities were petitioned to prevent 

interference with the boats. ■,,.«■ ai q ^ TT T » aP r Ontario 

An interesting address was delivered by Mr. Alex Eraser Ontario 

Provincial Archivist, in regard to the evidence given before the U. r,. ii. 

Claims Commission. . , „, , 

A lecture was given by Mr. Edward Harris on The Early Women of 

the C™£j^ ere two meeUng8 of the Executive and three general meetings 
of the Society during the year. 

Women's Wentworth Historical Society. 
A grant of $100 was received by the Society from the Provincial Gov- 

ernm The'one hundredth anniversary of the victory of Trafalgar and the 
death of Nelson was celebrated by a meeting held in the Armory, m which 
the pupils of the Public and Separate Schools joined, rendering a Patnotxc 
chorus Appropriate addresses were delivered by the Hon. J. P. Whitney, 
Premier, and the Hon. J. W. St. John. 

Library Conditions. 

During the past year library conditions in the Province show a steady 
implement. The conditions have been very favorable, arising prmcipally 
from thTerection and equipment of the libraries, which have received Rifts 
from Mr Andrew Carnegie These libraries are placed on a permanent basis, 
fhey are' able in manv instances to secure the services of trained librarians 
who have inaugurated modern methods of classification and numerous other 
rmprovements fruitful in good results. The friends of hbr aj P-jess upon 
the library boards and scattered through each community have taken heart, 
while the Ontario Librarv Association has exerted a powerful influence for 
progress. The combined result is shown in the education of the people, in 
the growing conviction that a Public Library is an esential part of the edu- 
cational system, that its maintenance is as necessary as is the maintenance 
of a public school. Once public sentiment upon this subject is aroused and 
educated through the press, from the platform and by individual appeals 
the result no longer can remain in doubt. 

Ontario Library Association. 

The sixth annual meeting of the Ontario Library Association was held 

in Toronto, April 16th and 17th, 1906. The meet in* was the most successful 

n the history of the Association and was attended by a large number of 

reoresentS from the Public Libraries throughout the Province The 

story of the librarv buildings of Ontario, illustrated by nearly 100 lantern 

des waste strong feature of the meeting. The addresses and papers 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 215 



were clear, practical and thoughtful. As the object of the Association is to 
promote the welfare of libraries, by stimulating public interest, in founding 
and improving them, I recommend that financial assistance be given the 
Association to enable it to hold at least one special meeting during the year 
1907, to which all librarians, trustees, directors and persons interested in 
library work should be invited and admitted without charge. A programme 
of practical work, under the direction of capable officers of the Association, 
would yield excellent results. 

General Classification, etc. 

The system of classification for public libraries is left to the direction 
of the respective library boards. Generally speaking, the classification adopted 
by the larger libraries is the Dewey or Cutter Systems, with modifications 
to suit local conditions. During the present year the Guelph Public Library 
has (under the direction of Mr. Tytler, the chairman of the purchasing 
committee), re-classified the fiction in accordance with the Cutter system. 
I understand that the Dewey system will be used for the other divisions of 
the library, and that the re-classification of the fiction has met with general 
approval. For all libraries a copy of the American Library Association 
catalogue is indispensable as a guide in selecting books, as the list includes 
7,520 volumes specially adapted to small libraries and those just starting. 

Publisher's Classification. 

Under the present system of classification practiced by dealers in mak- 
ing their invoices, History includes Historical Romances; General Lit- 
erature includes Moral Tales, Eomances and Juvenile Literature; Miscel- 
laneous includes Short Stories and Fairy Tales. 

The Act provides that only 20 ner cent, of the Government grant for 
books will be allowed for the expenditure on fiction. I find that the pub- 
lisher^ and wholesale dealers invoice all classes of fiction as History, Gen- 
eral Literature and Miscellaneous. The evil thus created is twofold: 

(a) If the books are catalogued in accordance with the invoices the fic- 
tion is scattered through the library, covering at least four sections, thus 
increasing the labors of the librarian and confusing the patrons. 

(b) The system is essentially misleading and dishonest. 

A careful examination of the Public Libraries shows that the percentage 
of fiction purchased and upon which grants are paid varies from 40 per cent 
to 75 per cent. I therefore respectfullv recommend that the present system 
of classification be abolished; that novels of all classes be classified as fiction 
and that the Regulation governing the grant for fiction be amended to read 
45 per cent, instead of 20 per cent., with the proviso tha^ the Minister of 
Education be empowered to reduce the percentage at his discretion by giving 
library boards notice of the proposed change. I am convinced that an hon- 
est classification will reduce the percentage of fiction purchased for Public 
Libraries, particularly in the smaller libraries. The standard for classifica- 
tion should (as far as possible) be the Library of Congress American Library 
Association Catalogue. 

Invoices, Vouchers, etc. 

Owing to the discovery of certain irregularities in the payment of Gov- 
ernment grants, the Minister of Education notified the library board of each 
Public Library as follows : 



216 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



"On and after January 1st, 1906, the Department of Education will 
require all Public Libraries hereafter desiring to qualify for Legislative 
(rrants to procure at the time of making purchase of books, newspapers maga- 
zines and periodicals, receipted detailed accounts made out in duplicate. One 
copy of such receipted invoice is to be forwarded with the annual report to 
the Education Department and the other kept on file by the treasurer The 
two files of receipted accounts and the annual report will then have to cor- 
respond at the end of the year." i_-i.ii -r „„u 

Under this regulation the invoices and vouchers upon which all legis- 
lative grants are made and paid will be retained by the Education Depart- 
ment This system will furnish a complete check and prevent irregularities 
arising from demands for grants which have already been paid. 

Sale of Public Libraries. 

Durinjr the present year several small Public Libaries have been seized 
and sold for debts contracted. Under the regulations this Department is 
powerless, unless an annual report has not been submitted for the past two 
years. In all cases to which my attention has been called the seizure or sale 
had been completed before notice was received by this Department. In 
some instances libraries containing over 1,000 books in an excellent state 
of preservation, were actually sold for less than $50 The records show that 
in every such case the Government grant to said libraries had exceeded 50 
per cent, of the actual cost of the books. To prevent a repetition of the waste 
of public money in the future, I recommend that the Act and regulations 
respecting Public Libraries he amended, said amendment to give the Minister 
of Education or the Education Department a first lien upon the books con- 
tained in every Public Library for the full amount of the Government grants 
paid to each library during the preceding six years, dating from the com- 
mencement of any action for the recovery of a debt against a Public Librar, . 
Such an amendment would stamp out the present evil and enable this depart- 
ment to take over the books of a defunct Public Library for the public 
benefit and use. 

The Building of New Libraries. 

During the past few years the generous gifts of Mr. Andrew Carnegie 
have wrought important changes in the building of and equipment of Public 
Libraries in several of the cities and important towns of the Province, lo 
furnish reliable information in the matter of library architecture the Depart- 
ment has secured from the Ontario Library Association a complete set oi lan- 
tern slides showing the Carnegie Public Libraries of the Province (including 
floor plans and other details), as well as views of several Carnegie Libraries in 
other Provinces and some Public Libraries in England. I shall be pleased to 
visit any locality and exhibit the slides for the definite information of library 
boards. 

Why do we need a Public Library ? 

How to start a Public Library. 

The History of a Village Library. 

Educationists in Ontario now recognize the necessity which exists fo 
strengthening school and public libraries, making them an essential pal 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 217 



of our educational system. To stimulate public interest in establishing and 
improving public libraries and to aid in securing financial assistance from 
wealthy citizens and cordial co-operation among taxpayers, greater publicity 
should be sought. To this end I have secured copies of the following pam- 
phlets : "A Village Library/' by Mary A. Tarbell, Librarian of the Brim- 
field Public Library; "Why do we need a Public Library," compiled by a 
Committee of the American Library Association; "How to start a Public 
Library." These pamphlets will be mailed free, upon application, and will 
be found helpful not only to beginners, but also to those having only local 
experience. 

Booh Lists. 

Committees of the Ontario Library Association have, during the year, 
prepared two valuable catalogues. 

(a) "A selected list of books published during the yea,r 1905, which are 
recommended by the Ontario Library Association for purchase by the public 
libraries of this Province. The books selected have been chosen to meet, as 
far as possible, the wants of the libraries for new books at a moderate price." 

(b) "Catalogue of children's books, alphabetically arranged ,by authors, 
giving title, publisher and price, compiled by Norman Gurd, B.C.L. , Presi- 
dent Ontario Library Association, C. A. Bowe, Brockville Public Library, 
and Effie A. Schmitt, Berlin Public Library. 

These catalogues were published for the Ontario Library Association by 
the department and copies mailed to each Public Library in the Province. 

Hints on Booh Purchasing for Small Libraries. 

The smaller library, having the most limited funds, must exercise the 
greatest care in selection. 

The books should be purchased in small quantities, at short intervals. 
This can be done by procuring catalogues which furnish an excellent out- 
line of the scope and contents of each book. 'Secure the A. L. A. Catalogue; 
6,000 volumes for a popular library, with notes. 

Frequent selections enable the librarian to announce through the columns 
of the local press, by means of notices posted in the library or by placing 
the latest books on a special table, that new books are being constantly added 
to the library, thus creating a lively interest among all classes of readers. 

As the library is a public institution it should be the aim of the library 
board to satisfy the demands of the community in which it is situated by 
catering, as far as possible, to the various tastes of readers. If, for instance, 
a factory or factories are located in the town be sure and secure some books 
treating of the industry or industries. Do not buy a subscription book. The 
agent who sells the book receives from 30 to 50 per cent, commission. 

In purchasing novels the safe rule is to choose those which are pub- 
lished by well known firms, and don't buy one because you see it extensively 
advertised. 

Don't buy American net books when you can avoid it. Buy the Eng- 
lish editions, they are nearly always cheaper. Probably one-half of the 
American net books of 1904 were published cheaper in England in 1903. 
Every library should be constantly making collections of magazine litera- 
ture for reference work. By this means invaluable material may be ac- 
quired. The better class of magazines contain the best fiction, the best 
poetry, the best essays during recent years. 



218 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Don't buy expensive books of reference and thus cripple the library for 
months for the benefit of a limited number of readers. 

Avoid red tape and rigid regulations which impede library develop- 
ment. 

Ninety per cent, of the borrowers of books from public libraries com- 
pleted their education at the public school. The mission of the public library 
is to reach and help tnese people. 

The poorest quality of binders' cloth will outlast the larger portion of 
leather used in bookbinding. Only the most expensive morocco is fit for 
bookbinding. 

Model Public School Libraries for the Normal Schools. 

Acting upon instructions received from the Hon. the Minister of Edu- 
cation, I prepared a Model Public School Library for the Normal Schools at 
Toronto, Ottawa and London. The libraries were put up in cheap folding 
cases; the cost of each library being $25.00, and the number of books aver- 
aged about 50. These libraries were prepared as object lessons for the stu- 
dents, showing the variety of subjects and extent of a Public School Library 
which could be purchased for $25.00. 

Restrictions, Age Limit, etc. 

I find great diversity among the Public Libraries of the Province rela- 
tive to restrictions, the age limit, etc. It is noticeable that libraries in 
which the greatest liberty is given are the most successful and prosperous. 
The circulation, in proportion to the number of books, is larger, while the 
percentage of fiction circulated is less. Rules and regulations are necessary, 
but in many instances the methods in force are obsolete and should be abo- 
lished. A Public Library should be as free and convenient to the people as 
possible. Mr. Utley, librarian of the Detroit Public Library, states the 
question as f ollows : — 

"The restrictions should be as few as is consistent with the proper con- 
servation of the property and the enforcement of equal and exact justice to 
all, certainly the spirit of any regulations should be a cordial invitation to 
the people to make the freest use of their own and a pledge of fairness to all 
and special favours to none." 

Every hinderance tends to hamper the influence of a library ; the library 
is maintained and the books purchased with money obtained from the public 
purse. 

To accomplish the best results our Public Libraries should be made free ; 
the public should be admitted to the shelves and the age limit abolished. 
Why should a child of twelve be refused a book while one of fourteen is 
deemed eligible? The time has arrived when Ontario library boards should 
acknowledge by and through their regulations that children can only be 
made readers, students and reasoners through the medium of books. The 
younger the child when he begins to read books the more universal will be 
the intelligence and culture. 

The Story Hour for Children. 

Up to the present time I have but one report showing that the story hour 
has been adopted in a Public Library in the Province ; many of our libraries 
can reasonably be expected, in the near future, to institute a story hour for 



ItMMi EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 219 



miscellaneous stories. The experience of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburg 
and of many small libraries in Wisconsin and in the New England States 
has long since demonstrated* the value of story telling. It stimulates the 
imagination of children, cultivates a taste for good literature and leads them 
to the best books. Many of the principals of our high and public schools 
would generously assist in telling stories if invited by the librarian and the 
board of management. 

The main object of the story hour is to draw attention to books and to 
books only. The school room atmosphere should be carefully avoided. The 
motto should be good to all children and "the right book to the right child 
at the right time." 

Story Telling to Children. 

Story telling to children has for the past few years been utilized in 
Public Libraries in the United States as a means for drawing children to bet- 
ter reading. The story hour for older children has also become an important 
factor in instructing and amusing. In many libraries a definite programme 
of stories has been prepared and carried out. When the stories are grouped 
about one subject for the purpose of making the children familiar with 
romantic forms of literature and to arouse their interest in real literature 
the result has been highly encouraging. 

As many of our librarians are gifted with humor, pathos and imagina- 
tive qualities, the essentials to good story telling, I trust that the coming 
year will see the practice established in Ontario. 

Extract from letter received from Norman Gurd, B.C.L., Sarnia, Presi- 
dent of the Ontario Library Association : 

"It is most gratifying to have your approval of the work we are doing 
in the Sarnia library for children. There is no more promising field of work 
for the libraries of Ontario, and there is none more neglected. Our Board, 
about two years ago, began to realize that the library was not doing what 
it might do for children. We them began to study the problem. At that 
time we found that practically all the books in the juvenile department were 
story books. We obtained lists of suitable books for children from different 
sources, embracing books in all the departments of literature, and ordered 
books from these lists. At first the children were slow in taking out these 
books, but the better literature steadily gained in popularity. We appointed 
our assistant librarian children's librarian. She would have her regular 
duties as assistant librarian, but we thought that if she were given full 
charge of the children's department, she would be ambitious to make it a 
success, and to obtain credit for the work done from the Board. This, we 
found, was a correct surmise. 

"Miss Spereman, the assistant librarian, began to make a study of the 
needs of the children. We provided books and pamphlets on children's 
work for her to read, and she also visited the children's department in the 
Port Huron Library, which is a large library administered according to mod- 
ern ideas, and got many valuable hints. We found that she identified her- 
self with the children, and was able quietly to influence their reading for 
good. The next step we took was to place the children's books in the child- 
ren's room entirely separate from the adults' library, thus virtually con- 
stituting two libraries under the same rule. The children's library is di- 
vided into the same classes as the adults and covers the same ground, though, 
of course, we have not so many books. 



220 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



"We had, prior to this, subscribed for children's magazines and period- 
icals and placed them on the magazine rack in their room. We had also 
fitted up the room with tables and chairs of different sizes to accommodate 
children of all ages. We bought colored nature study charts and exhibited 
them in the children's room. We also hung good productions of well- 
known pictures on the walls. The children were made monitors of their 
own room, and instructed to keep it tidy. This plan is working well. The 
children at first scattered the magazines about the room, and left books piled 
up on the tables, and the books were very much misplaced on the shelves. 
They feel now that the care of the room is left open to them and take a per- 
sonal interest in it, and we feel it tends to make them feel at home in the 
library. 

"The children's story hour is a very recent development, and is the most 
forward step we have taken. The story hour to-day on "Child Life in Rus- 
sia" was attended by eighty-four children, and at the conclusion of the 
talk the children took practically all the books on Russia we had in the 
library. The children attending range in age from the children in the kin- 
dergarten to those of sixteen and seventeen. The story hour also gives the 
librarian an opportunity to speak to the children about the care of the books, 
behaviour while in the library, and also keeps her in friendly touch with the 
children. They are asked for suggestions as to the subjects for future story 
hours. These talks are very informal, and the children appear to be perfectly 
at home and ask questions quite freely. The blackboard is used for lists of 
books touching on the subject under discussion. Illustrated books bearing 
on the subject are brought down to the auditorium and shown to the child- 
ren. 

"We think that the inauguration of this step in the children's work has 
commended itself to the people of the town, since we have had numbers of 
the people speak most favorably of the movement. 

"Along this line we have arranged for a science master at the Collegiate 
to deliver a series of lectures on nature study, illustrated by magic lantern 
slides. This will probably attract the older children, though, of course, all 
will be welcome. 

"The Sarnia library has, I think, amongst Ontario Libraries, the repu- 
tation of being rather too much given to experiment and too venturesome. 
Our adoption of free access was thought to be a very dangerous move, and 
our ceasing to require guarantors for all those desiring membership in the 
library is considered to involve almost certain loss to the library. We have, 
too, abolished all fees, and the library is truly a free library. I do not 
know of a library where they do not charge a fee for cards except ours." 

Exhibits of Library Plans. 

This department is desirous of securing a collection of exhibits of library 
plans, appliances, systems,; etc. This can only be accomplished by the help of 
librarians in all parts of the Province, who are asked to forward everything 
bearing on the administrative work of the library under his or her charge ; any 
special feature peculiar to a library will be considered of the greatest value. A 
copy of the last annual report should be sent. If this request is complied 
with but a short time will elapse before a valuable collection will be secured. 
Photographs, architectural plans and descriptions of mechanical devices 
which have been found to yield good results will be carefully preserved and 
reproduced for the benefit of other libraries. The co-operation of architects 
who have designed Public Libraries should be sought in this work by local 
boards and librarians. 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 221 



Children's Model Libraries. 

One of the principal defects in the Public Libraries is the absence of 
books suitable for children. When asked for a reason why the cnild nas 
been neglected the answer is generally, "the Sunday school is supposed to 
provide for the children." I am strongly of the opinion that we shall not 
be able to create the reading habit until we have made a special feature of 
children's books in every Public Library; many of the books relating to child 
study will be found quite as valuable to mothers as to teachers. The child 
should not only be permitted to visit the library but should be encouraged to 
do so; once the path is opened for them they will follow it. There should 
be little books for little hands with plenty of pictures. The age limit should 
be abolished root and branch. As object lessons several model libraries for 
children, including pictures, should be prepared by this department and 
loaned for a few weeks to libraries. 

Public Reference Library, Toronto. 

The corner stone of the Public Reference Library Building for Toronto 
was laid by the Honourable Chief Justice Falconbridge on Tuesday, the 27th 
of November of this year. The opening of this library will mark an import- 
ant epoch in the history of the Public Library movement in the Province. 
Such a library will be of the greatest value not only to the citizens of Toronto, 
but also to all parts of Ontario. The thousands of students who are annually 
in attendance at the Provincial University and its affiliated colleges will find 
the library invaluable. Under the charge of Dr. Bain, the chief librarian, 
the reference library should soon rank among the most useful libraries on 
this continent. 

Historical Societies. 

The Ontario Historical -Society continues to do a good work, while exer- 
cising a wholesome influence by fostering the establishment of local societies, 
with which it is generallv affiliated. These local societies are frequently the 
means through which written and printed material of the greatest value is 
collected and preserved. The study of Canadian history and literature is 
thus encouraged by the preservation of historical landmarks. 

While some of the local societies are doing excellent work in collecting 
and publishing, an examination of the several reports for the current year 
leads to the conclusion that it would be advisable to make the government 
grant conditional ; making the minimum basis a certain number of members, 
a specific number of meetings and the publication of at least one valuable 
pamphlet per annum. 

Travelling Libraries. 

One of the greatest obstacles hindering the growth of Public Libraries 
in small communities is the difficulty experienced in securing sufficient funds 
for the purchase of new books. The government grant, being based upon 
the amount expended annually for books, is necessarily small, consequently 
demands are constantly made for a larger grant. A very large increase 
would be necessary to effect any substantial improvement among the small 
libraries, as the major portion of the grant would be absorbed by the larger 
libraries. A systematic and continued effort should be made to give access 
to collections of good books by farmers and the residents of small villages. 



222 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



To accomplish such a desirable result, I recommend the development of and 
increase in the- number of Travelling Libraries. Heretofore the Travelling 
Libraries of the Province have practically been confined to the lumber camps 
of New Ontario. The camps are only operated on an average of six months 
in the year, consequently during the balance of the time the books are idle. 
In view of the fact that struggling libraries in the older portion of the Pro- 
vince would gladly circulate the books at any time it is evident that a change 
should be made under which the Travelling Libraries will be kept constantly 
in use. 

The failure of small libraries (several of which have been closed during 
the past year for lack of funds) can be easily traced to the following causes : — 

(1) The purchase of books not suited to the class of readers. These are 
usually valuable books, including many costly historical works, which the 
community declare "uninteresting." 

(2) Infrequent supplies of new books. 

I have not found a small library languishing when new and suitable 
volumes have been supplied. With fresh books a country library remains 
as vigorous as a city library. 

To inaugurate a new system of library extension, simple, practical and 
economical, it is necessary to extend the Travelling Library. Each library 
should consist of about fifty books, to be sent out in a convenient case. The 
outfit should contain a small register and a type-written catalogue. Said 
libraries should be loaned to the small or struggling Public Libraries for 
three months. By establishing circuits of from ten to twelve libraries in a 
county or group of counties the cost of changing the libraries would be re- 
duced to the minimum and the duplication of books guarded against. A few 
of the libraries should be made up to suit the needs of special organisations, 
clubs or localities. Under such a plan these libraries would be used in four 
different places during the year, and it is safe to say that the circulation of 
the books by this means would be quadrupled. The local library would pay 
transportation charges and for any volumes lost or damaged beyond ordinary 
wear. 

A few Travelling Libraries have been nrepared and sent out as indicated. 
The system will be rapidly extended in 1907. 

Carnegie Public Libraries in Ontario. 

The establishment of Carnegie Public Libraries in some of the cities 
and towns of the Province has proved not only beneficial to the localities in 
which they have been opened, but their influence is felt in other centres of 
population and in rural libraries of the smallest class. 

In more than one locality the Carnegie Public Library is gradually 
becoming the natural local centre of the community. Citizens are proud of 
the building and its surroundings. They know that the days of doubt have 
passed ; financially it is on a firm, foundation. It rapidly makes for itself a 
place in the affections of the community and becomes the centre of various 
local interests; as the fountain of intellectual life and the agent of common 
culture it fills many wants felt by old and young, gradually its power for 
good is recognized and citizens willingly co-operate in its improve- 
ment. The personality of the librarian becomes an effective influence in the 
community. He ceases to be considered a watchdog to keep the people away 
from the books that they may be as little worn as possible, and his advice 
is more and more sought by the inexperienced. 



1!)0<; EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 223 



The problem of the hour is to carry on the education after the elemen- 
tary steps have been taken in the free public schools. An education system 
which contents itself with abandoning the child who has left the school is, 
as Huxley tersely said, as inconsistent and absurd as to teach our children 
the expert use of the knife, fork and spoon, and then provide them with no 
food. 

Carnegie Gifts for 1906. 

The following are the gifts made by Mr. Carnegie in 1906 for Public 
Libraries in Ontario: Dresden, |8,000; Milton, $5,000; Perth, f 10,000; 
Picton, |12,000; Bracebridge, $10,000; Gravenhurst, |7,000; Oshawa, 
112,000; Wallaceburg, f 11,500; Kincardine, f 5,000; Kemptville, f 3,000; 
Hanover, f 10,000; Orangeville (additional), f 2,500. 

Preparing Boohs for the Shelves. 

In many of the smaller libraries I find that the books are disfigured in 
preparing them for the shelves. A black japan can be purchased with which 
a background is first made. When the japan is dry the lettering and num- 
bering can be completed with artist's white paint. This system produces 
uniformity in appearance and is reported by librarians to wear exceedingly 
well. 

Repairing Books. 

Owing to the low .price at which books are now sold the binding is frail 
and frequently defective. In many small libraries no attempt is made to 
repair the books, consequently they soon become ragged in appearance and 
the life of the book is comparatively short. This department has secured 
samples of adhesive paper and cloth with which the librarian is able to make 
necessary repairs in the first stages, thus improving the general appearance 
of the library and doubling the working life of many books. Samples of 
adhesive paper and cloth will be sent to library boards on application, with 
the names of dealers and prices. 

Assistance. / 

During the year I have received many valuable hints and suggestions, 
with practical assistance, from the executive officers of the Ontario Library 
Association. The President, Mr. Norman Gurd, the Secretary, Mr. E. A. 
Hardy, and Dr. James Bain, Toronto Public Library, have been constant in 
their desire to improve the library system of the Province. The Minister of 
Education fully appreciates their efforts and recognizes the benefits which 
must follow from a system of consultation between the Association and the 
Department. Several important problems have been submitted for consid- 
eration at the next annual meeting of the Association. 

Selecting Historical Boohs. 

\ am pleased to note that in the selection of books bearing upon the 
early history of the original North American Colonies and also the war 
of 1812, the Book Committees of Ontario libraries are exercising additional 
care; many works, which in the past were purchased, are now excluded. 
The tendency of most writers in the United States who deal with interna- 
tional questions is, unfortunately, to laud their own country at the expense 
of British institutions, and to accept as facts statements which have long 
since been shown to be false. Traducing the memory of United Empire 



224 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Loyalists has been a favourite theme with such authors. The greatest care 
should be taken to prevent the circulation of books of this character through 
the medium of our Public Libraries. 

Boohs Presented. 

During the year Messrs. Charles Scribner & Sons, New York, presented 
this Department with 142 volumes, including History, Fiction, Literature, 
Natural History, Art and Pedagogy. The collection is a valuable one and 
has been transferred to the Education Library, where it can be inspected 
by intending purchasers for Public Libraries in the Province. 

Some Public Libraries in Ontario 

For the assistance of Library Boards contemplating the erection of new 
libraries the accompanying half-tone illustrations, floor plans and descrip- 
tions have been prepared showing some of the modern Public Libraries of the 
Province. The list is not complete, owing to the difficulties experienced in 
securing photographs and blue prints. 

The Sarnia Free Public Library. 

The Sarnia Free Public Library was completed and formally opened on 
the 26th of November, 1903. The building is of stone and red pressed brick 
with cut stone trimmings, a metal dome and slate roof. The size of the 
building is 65 x 80. In the basement is an auditorium 32 x 42, men's smok- 
ing room 19 x 19, men's lavatory, cloak room, furnace and coal room, and a 
storage room 22 x 22 ; there is also a large room 62 x 40 which is unused at 
present, but will be put to such uses as the needs of tne Library may deveop. 

The auditorium may be used by any body of a public or semi-public na- 
ture, without charge. The Historical Society, The Children's Aid Society, 
The Medical Association, The Camera Club, and a number of literary and 
other societies regularly meet in this room. 

The smoking room is supplied with newspapers and tables for chess and 
checkers are provided. 

The rooms on the main floor are a General reading room 35 x 20, a Chil- 
dren's room 20 x 20, a Board room 12 x 19, Eotunda 22 x 22, the Librarian's 
office, ladies' lavatory and a combined stack and reference room 30 x 54. 

The Children's room contains all books for juveniles on shelves around 
the walls. These books may be taken for reading in the room without the in- 
tervention of any attendant, or, if desired for home use, a book is taken to 
the Librarian's counter and charged against the borrower. • In the Children's 
room the chairs and tables are graduated in size so as to accommodate chil- 
dren of all ages. The walls are hung with pictures and the tables are sup- 
plied with children's magazines and periodicals. 

Tne Librarian's counter projects into the rotunda, thus giving him super- 
vision of all rooms on the main floor. The Board room is also used for small 
public meetings, when it is not necessary to use the auditorium. The Medi- 
cal Association has its own library on shelves around the walls of this room. 

The west wing of the stackroom is for reference books. The width of the 
aisles between the stacks is 5 feet. Chairs and tables are provided for those 
desiring to read in the stackroom. 

The interior finish and fittings are in oak. The floors are maple. Book 
stacks are steel, 8 feet in height, with the exception of the Children's room, 
where there are oak wall cases. 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 225 



Provision was made in the original plan for increasing the capacity of 
the stackroom. After moving into the building the stackroom was found to 
be too small, and in 1905 a second application was made to Mr. Carnegie for 
15000.00 to enlarge this room. The total cost of the building exclusive of 
lot was 120,000.00. 

The furniture, which is of special library design, cost |1,500.00 The 
building is heated by hot water, with grates in a number of the rooms. This 
system has proved most satisfactory, the consumption of coal not exceeding 
25 tons a year. 

In 1902 the Board received $15,000.00 from Mr. Carnegie, and in 1905 
$5,000.00. 

The Board in 1902 applied through the Mayor to Mr. Carnegie for a 
grant for a Library building. Mr. Carnegie offered $15,000.00, provided the 
Council guaranteed an income of not less than ten per cent, of the gift, and 
furnished a site. The Council accepted this offer by resolution, a certified 
copy of which was sent to Mr. Carnegie. 

A site was given on Victoria Park. The grant was paid to the Library 
Board on progress certificates from the architect. 

In 1905 a second application was made to Mr. Carnegie by the Board di- 
rectly, for $5,000.00 to enlarge the stackroom. This was granted on the usual 
terms. 

At the time of the opening of the Library the Board was composed of R. 
J. McArthur, Chairman; J. J. Spereman, Secretary; Mayor Barr, Rev. J. 
R. Hall, Robert Mac Adams, H. W. Mills, D. D. Moshier, M. Sullivan, and 
Norman Gurd. The staff consisted of William Sweet, Librarian; Patricia 
Spereman, Assistant Librarian, and Arthur Payne, Janitor. Free access to 
all books w r as inaugurated in 1903, and has been permitted ever since. There 
is no age limit, but children cannot become members without the consent of 
parents. 

The system of classification in use is the Dewey Decimal system, with 
card catalogue. 

Since moving into the new building the Board has devoted special atten- 
tion to the Library's work for children. Books suitable for children in every 
department of literature have been freely purchased, so that the children's 
library is now an epitome of the adult's. The Assistant Librarian has been 
given special charge of the children's work. The policy of the Board has not 
been to send out Travelling Libraries to the schools, but rather to bring the 
children to the Library. The Board has secured the co-operation of the 
teachers, who attend at the Library and make lists of suitable books for the: 
different forms. Copies of these lists are given to the children's librarian. 
Scholars in each form are given lists of books to be read during the term. 
Some of the teachers also bring their scholars to the Library. Suggestions 
are also received from the teachers as to suitable books which should be added 
to the Library. 

The Library Board publish reviews of important books in the town pa- 
pers. These reviews are written by people who are especially interested in 
the subject covered. 

No fees are collected from borrowers for cards or otherwise, except by 
way of fines for injury to books or for keeping books overtime. Any resident 
of the town, on signing an application may become a member without a guar- 
antor, whether he is a property owner or not. Two books may be drawn at 
one time, provided only one is fiction. 

The only serious defect in the building was the small stackroom. This 
was remedied by the extension before referred to. 

15 ED. 



226 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Goderich Public Library. 

Library completed : January, 1905. 

Library opened : March 3rd, 1905. 

Materials used in building : Stone and red brick. 

The building is triangular. The three longest sides are 35-26 and 25 ft. 

Basement : Lecture room, Gymnasium, Coal room, Furnace room. 

Height of ceiling in basement : 11-6. 

Ground floor : 

General Reading room : 28x24. 

Ladies' Reading room : 25x21. 

Stack room : 31x22. 

Board room : 22x18. 

Ladies' Toilet room. 

Height of ceiling : 18 ft. 
Second floor : 

Six rooms in this flat ; height of ceiling : 10 ft. 

Wood used for interior finish : Pine and ash. 

Wood used for fittings : Oak. 

Book stacks : Oak. 

Height of stacks : 6-6. 

No provision made for increasing capacity of stack room. 

Cost of building exclusive of site : $9,273. 

Cost of furnishings : |900. 

System of heating : Combination of hot water and hot air. 

Defects : In severe weather one furnace is not sufficient. 
Gift from Mr. Carnegie : $10,000. 

The late Mr. A. J. Moore, one of the staff of the Collegiate Institute, 
and also Secretary of the Library Board, suggested securing a grant from 
Mr. Carnegie. A meeting of the ratepayers was held and endorsed the sug- 
gestion and the gift was secured on the usual conditions, and the contract 
for the building let April 11th, 1903. 

Members of the Library Board when library was opened : 

W. T. Murney, Mayor; James Robertson, John Kernighan, Rev. 
Joseph Elliott, J. Elgin Tom, James H. Ligert, H. D. Reed, 
Judge Doyle, J. D. O'Connell. 

Official staff at time of opening : 

J. E. Tom, Chairman. 

J. Kernighan, Treas. 

D. J. Naftel, Sec. 

Andrew Duff, Librarian. 
Free access to the books is not permitted. 
Age limit : 12 years. 
A printed catalogue is used. 

The building is defective ; the librarian is not able to see into the read- 
ing room from the delivery desk. 
15a ED. 



1900 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



227 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



GROUND FLOQP. PLAN 

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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 229 



St. Catharines Public Library. 

Library completed in 1904. 

Library opened Jan. 2nd, 1905. 

Materials used in building : Pressed brick and Roman stone. 

Woods used for interior finish : Red birch and oak. 

Wood used for fittings: Red birch. 

Material used for stacks: Pine and red birch. 

Height of stacks : 7-2. 

No provision made for increasing capacity of stack room. 

Cost of building exclusive of lot : f 25,000. 

Cost of furnishings: $3,000. 

System of heating : Steam. 

Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : f 25,000. 

Members of Library Board at time of opening : 

Dr. E. M. Hooper, Chairman; Geo. C. Carlisle, Sheriff Dawson, 
J. H. Ingersoll, James Lawrence, A. W. McMaugh, Mayor 
Sweet. 
Official staff at time of opening : 

James Douglass, Sec. 

A. S. Martin, Librarian. 

Miss L. E. May, Assistant Librarian. 

Joseph Marriott, Caretaker. 
Free access to books not permitted. 
There is no age limit. 
System of classification : Dewey decimal. 
Card catalogue in use. 
Defects in library : Stack room too small for increase of library. 



230 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




x 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



231 



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232 



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11)06 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 233 



NEW REFERENCE LIBRARY BUILDING, TORONTO. 

After a prolonged discussion of the relative merits of sites with the 
Board of the Toronto Public Library, the City Council undertook to provide 
a site for the New Reference Library on the north-west corner of College 
and St. George Streets. The property decided upon measures 234 feet on 
College .Street and 364 feet on St. George, thus providing ample accommo- 
dation for future extension of the proposed building if required. 

Early in 1905 the Board prepared a programme of competition for the 
selection of an architect, and fixed the 31st January as the date upon which 
the plans were to be sent in, and offered $750 as prizes to be divided among 
the three most worthy. The judges were the Mayor, a member of the City 
Council and Public Library Board, the Chief Librarian, City Architect and 
a non-competing architect to be chosen by others. This Committee, after 
a number of meetings, reported in March 2nd, 1906, that they had not found 
any plans which filled the required conditions and recommended that no 
prize be awarded, but that the sum of $1,000 be divided among the four 
which, in their judgment, were the most satisfactory, and also that the four 
architects whose plans were thus chosen were to be asked to modify them in 
accordance with certain conditions specified. Of the modified plans sent 
in. in accordance with this recommendation, the committee chose those 
prepared by Messrs. Wickson, Gregg and A. H. Chapman, and their action 
was promptly confirmed by the Board. 

Working plans were prepared during the summer of 1906 and tenders 
invited in the month of October. The different portions of the work were 
awarded to the following contractors : — 

Excavation— Page & Co ' $3,500 00 

Masonry and Brickwork — Brown & Love 68,720 00 

Concrete and Cement— A. Gardner & Co 24,820 00 

Terra Cotta— Excelsior Terra Cotta Co., New York 12.540 00 

Carpenter and Joiner — Charles Rogers Sons & Co 14,350 00 

Painting and Glazing — Joseph McCausland & Son 5,990 00 

Plastering— Hoidge & Sons 32,968 00 

Roofing and Sheet Metal— A. B. Ormsby, Ltd 3,240 00 

Steel Work— McGregor & Mclntyre, Ltd 8,884 00 

Electric Wiring and Telephone— W. J. McGuire & Co 5,030 00 

Stack Work— Snead Co. Iron Works, Jersey City 31.400 00 

Plumbing— J. E. Gray 2,464 00 

Steam Heating— W. J. McGuire & Co 15,600 00 

Elevators— Turnbull Elevator Mfg. Co 1,475 00 



$230,981 00 

The Corner Stone of the new building was laid by the Hon. Chief Justice 

Falconbridge, on November 27th, 1906. His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor 

occupied the chair and a large number of distinguished citizens were present. 

The contractors have been active in pushing on their work, and by the 

1st January the foundations of the whole building were ready. 

As the name chosen by the Board intimates, the new building is for a 
Reference Library for the City of Toronto, so that its whole character is based 
on this intention. It is, however, intended to occupy the ground floor with 
a small branch library of about 10,000 volumes, and a door has been pro- 
vided on the western end where access is given to this circulating library. 
A large reading-room with railed divisions will be made separating the read- 
ing quarter from the section set apart for the general readers, for teachers 



234 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1900 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



285 




236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



PUBLIC 
REFERENCE LIBRARY 

FOR THE 

CITY OP TCRO: ITO 



Vv'ICKSON 5 GREGG, " 
AH CHAPMAN 

ASSOCIATED ARCHITECTS 
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1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



237 



PUBLIC 
REFERENCE LIBRARY 

FOR THE 

CITY OP TORONTO 



WICKSON 5 GREGG 
AHCHAPMAN 

ASSOCIATED ARCHITECT 
39 YONGE 5T 

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238 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



PUBLIC 
REFERENCE LIBRARY 

FOR THE 

CITY OF TORONTO 



•WICKoON &GREQG 
AH-CHAPKLW 
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EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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16 ED. 



242 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



and children. The room will be about 16 feet high and lighted from three 
sides. On the same floor on St. George -Street the offices and quarters for 
the staff will be placed in a series of rooms which will also provide accom- 
modation for duplicates and necessary work-rooms. 

The first floor will be attained by a stone stair from the south-east corner 
of the building, forming the main entrance, which will be devoted entirely 
to the Reference Library. It includes a large room 136 feet in length by 
50 feet in width, and which is intended entirely for the use of readers. 
Immediately behind the main reading-room are the cataloguing and delivery 
rooms, and still further back is the main building of the stack-house, 72 x 
40 feet. It will consist of five stories of iron and glass construction, amply 
lighted on both sides and completely isolated from the rest of the building, 
the only entrance into it being from the rear of the delivery-room. 

On the St. George Street side are the offices of the Board and Librarian, 
and a long gallery for the keeping and use of bound volumes of newspapers 
and art books. The second story, reached by a staircase from the main hall, 
is composed of one long gallery facing St. George Street, lighted with sky- 
lights, intended for the exhibition of rare maps and local pictures. 

The point which differentiates this library from any yet attempted in 
Canada, and from most in the United States, consists, first, in the almost 
entire elimination of useless halls and passages, and second, in the centrali- 
zation of the whole of the work of the library, in the centre of the building, 
so that the attendants at the delivery desk have complete observation over 
the entire floor and at the same time are in close touch with the cataloguing- 
room and stack-house. Third, the stack-house is absolutely fire proof, and 
^he rest of the building is what is called slow combustion. The walls are 
of brick and stone, the different floors are of iron and cement, so that little 
else other than the furniture is of wood. Fourth, the cataloguing-room is 
immediately over the bindery (which is supplied with a hoist) and has on 
one side the stack-house and on the other, the rear of the card cataloguing 
case. Fifth, the plan provides for any extension on its present site, with- 
out interfering with the light or safety. The stack-house and reading-rooms 
nre estimated to hold about 300,000 volumes, and the cost, including archi- 
tect's fee, will be about $260,000. The amount given by Mr. Carnegie for 
the building was $275,000. 

Berlin Public Library. 

The first steps taken to secure a Carnegie Library for Berlin were taken 
in 1900, but owing to opposition the matter was dropped. In 1901 an appli- 
cation was made to Mr. Carnegie for a gift of $15,000, which was granted. 
When tenders for the building were opened it was found that they exceeded 
the grant by $4,000. A second application for this sum was made and also 
granted. A further sum of $4,000 was given for furnishing the building. 
The corner stone was laid October 15th, 1902, and the library formally 
opened January 9th, 1904. 

The members of the Board at that time were : — 
Rev. W. A. Bradley, B.A., Chairman. 
D. Forsyth, B.A., Secretary. 
Eev. J. W. German, Rev. R. Von Pirch, Rev. Jos. Schweitzer, 

Robert Smyth and Karl Mueller. 
Effie A. Schmidt, Librarian. 
Library completed January, 1904. 
Material used in building: Pressed brick. 

16a ED. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



243 




244 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 247 



The Basement : — 

Smoking room : 16 x 26. 

Stack-room : 12 x 30. 

Furnace-room : 39 x 40. 
First Floor: — 

Reading room : 60 x 39. 

Study: 18 x 12. 

Librarian's room : 18 x 22. 

Stack room: 20 x 29. 

Cloak room : 11 x 10. 

Large entrance. 

The reading room is divided as follows : — 

German department and children's department on one side of the 
entrance. Magazine and newspaper department on the other 
side. 
Second Floor : — 

Museum : 13 x 20. 

Lecture hall: 34 x 39. 

Board room: 17 x 25. 

Women's Club: 19 x 21. 
Material used in finishing : Quarter-cut oak. 
Material used in furnishings : Quarter-cut oak. 
Height of stacks: 7 feet. 

Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of furnishing : $20,000. 
Cost of furnishings : $4,500. 
System of heating : Combination. 
Low pressure steam heating would be preferable. 
Gift from Mr. Carnegie : $24,500. 
Free access is given to all books except fiction. 
Age limit : 14 years. Parents can take out cards for children. 
Dewey decimal classification in use. 
Defects : — 

The entrance to the building is too small and not prominent enough 
for the size of the building. It is the intention of the Board 
to remedy this defect. 

A special catalogue has been prepared for children. 

Card catalogue in use. 

Brantford Public Library. 

Brantford, according to current report, had a Public Library at an early 
period of its history, even before the Rebellion of 1837. This event led to 
its temporary extermination. On or about the year 1853 it was revived. 
One of the first librarians was the late James Woody att, and under his man- 
agement the library reached a fair degree of prosperity. It was known 
under the name of the "Mechanics' Institute," and was supported mainly 
by ,the fees of members and the proceeds of an annual excursion. In the 
year J.879 the library was burned and all the records perished. 

On the passing of the Act of March 1882, providing for the establish- 
ment of Free Libraries, the Board of the Mechanics' Institute set about 
effecting a change, and on the 30th of November, 1883, a petition was put in 
circulation and articles published in the local papers with this end in view. 
The necessary by-law passed the council unopposed on December 3rd, 1883, 



248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



249 



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First Floor Plan 



250 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



BRRNTFORD . PUBLIC . LIBRARY. 



BOARD ROOM 
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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 251 



and was voted on and carried on the 7th of January, 1884. The Public 
Library occupied quarters in the Heyd Block, opposite the Post Office, till 
July, 1904, when it was moved to the present handsome building opposite 
Victoria Park. 

In the early part of the year 1902 rumours of Mr. Carnegie's benefactions 
began to circulate. Fortunately his Honor, Judge Hardy, dropped a note 
of inquiry to the eminent philanthropist, which his secretary speedily an- 
swered, offering $30,000 for the erection of a Library Building if the City 
of Brantford would pledge itself by resolution of council to support a Free 
Public Library at cost of not less than $3,000 a year, and provide a suitable 
site. The necessary resolution was passed by the City Council, and the by- 
law to provide for the purchase of a suitable site was passed on the 20th 
October, 1902, and the George Street site, opposite Victoria Park, was 
selected. The plans of Messrs. Stewart, Stewart & Taylor, Architects, Ham- 
ilton, were accepted and the contract for the erection of the building was 
awarded to the Schultz Bros. Co., Limited, of Brantford, and the work was 
immediately proceeded with. 

The corner stone was laid on December 16th, 1902, by the Rev. Dr. Mac- 
kenzie, Chairman of the Library Board, and the building was completed 
and ready for occupation on July 1st, 1904. 

In March, 1904, the Library Board desired to make alterations of the 
interior finish of the building and communicated with Mr. Carnegie, asking 
him if he would make an extra grant of $5,000 for this purpose. The request 
was promptly acceeded to, thus making $35,000 the total amount of Mr. 
Carnegie's grant for the Brantford Public Library. 

Members of the Library Board on the date of the opening of the build- 
ing:— 

Rev. Dr. Mackenzie, Chairman; M. J. Kelly, M.D., LL.B., R. S. 
Schell, Rev. P. Lennon, J. P. Hoag, M.A., Geo. S. Harold, Wm. Cutmore, 
G. H. Muirhead and M. K. Halloran. 

The names of the members of the Library Staff : — 

E. D. Henwood, Librarian; Miss Fanny E. Lindsay, Miss Estelle Car- 
ling, Miss Jennis A. Draper, Assistants, and John Chapman, Janitor. 

In the library proper there are eight rooms, including the rotunda, used 
as follows: — Men's reading room, ladies' reading room, ladies' lavatory, 
reference room, catalogue room, stack room and librarian's office. 

In the basement there are eight rooms as follows: — Men's reading and 
smoking room, museum, furnace room, work room, board room, private lava- 
tory, men's lavatory and cataloguing room. 

Free access to the books is not permitted. 

Age limit : 14. 

System of classification and cataloguing : We are at the present time 
installing the Dewey Decimal System. 

Cost of building : Building and furniture complete, $35,250. 

System of heating : Hot water. 

Defects in present building. 

1st. The approach to the front entrance of the building is reached by 
a flight of 24 stone steps. While this makes a very handsome building I 
think that for the aged and infirm people who patronize the building it would 
be an improvement if the library proper had been on the ground floor and 
the entrance a little above the level of the sidewalk. 

2nd. Our reading rooms are isolated, each room being independent of 
the rest of the building. It can easily be seen that with a limited staff the 
one room library is much preferable. 



252 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



3rd. No means were provided for taking out coal ashes, refuse, etc., all 
of which has to be carried out in boxes. 

4th. In the heating of the basement the radiators are suspended from 
the ceiling and has proved most unsatisfactory, so much so that in severe 
weather the greater part of the basement cannot be used. 

Materials used in building: Brick and Terra Cotta. 

Size of building : 96 x 77 feet. 

Wood used for interior finish : Quarter-cut oak for library proper ; 
grained pine and quarter-cut oak for basement and fittings. 

Material used for stacks : Wood. 

Provision has been made in original plan for increasing capacity of 
stack room. 

Cost of building and furnishings : $35,250. 

Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $35,000. 

Brockville Public Library. 

Library completed : July 1st, 1904. 

Library opened : August 13th, 1904. 

Material used in building: Pressed red brick, grey stone witb slate roof. 

Size of building: 61 x 65. 

The Basement : — 

Lecture hall: 27 x 47. 

Ash room : 5 x 10. 

Boiler room : 10 x 16. 

Coal room : 5 x 14. 

Receiving room: 7-6 x 34. 

Store room : 12 x 18. 

Ladies' toilet room : 6 x 12. 

Gentlemen's toilet room. 
First Flat : — 

General reading room : 26 x 28. 

Reference room : 17 x 26. 

Stack room : 26 x 28. 

Librarian's room: 10 x 17. 

Toilet room : 6 x 8. 
Entering the building at the main (corner) door on the ground floor the 
corridor is 8 x 20. The corridor where the books are distributed is 8 x 28 ; 
the corridor at the side entrance is 10 x 10. 

The height of the ceilings are: For ground floor, 18 ft., and for base- 
ment, 10 ft. 

System of heating : Hot water. 
Material used in stacks : Steel. 
Height of stacks : 7 feet, 6 inches. 

Material used in finishing building : Quarter-cut oak. 
Material used in furniture : Quarter-cut oak. 
Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of lot: $15,447. 
Cost of furnishing : $1,698. 
Gift from Mr. Carnegie : $17,000. 

Names of persons on Library Board when Library was opened : 
Rev. H. H. Bedford Jones, R. H. Lindsay, Judge H. S. McDonald, 
Dr. A. J. Macaulay, Albert Abbott, Robert Laidlaw, W. C. MaeLaren, E. 
A. Geiger, Mayor S. J. Geash. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



253 




254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Brockville Public Library 




First Floor Plan 



1900 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



255 



BROCKVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY 




BASEMENT PLAN 



256 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Names of official staff at time of opening : 
Miss Carrie A. Rowe, Librarian. 
Miss Minnie A. Rowe, Assistant Librarian. 
E. A. Geiger, Sec.-Treas. 

Free access is not permitted to books except in Reference Library. 
Age limit : 14 years. 

Printed catalogue : Card catalogue for librarian only. 
Defects : — 

The roof is a trifle too flat for the Canadian winter. A door from the 
basement to the street should have been provided. 

Chatham Public Library. 

Library completed : September, 1903. 
Library opened : September 14th, 1903. 

Materials used in building: First story, stone in coursed ashlar; second 
story, pressed brick. 

Size of building : 60 x 60. 
Basement : — 

Assembly hall : 40 x 33. 

Library Board room : 12 x 16. 

Fuel room : 10-6 x 11-4. 

Unpacking room : 10-6 x 11-4. 

Boiler room : 16-8 x 25-4. 

Newspaper Reading room : 16-8 x 25-4. 

Two Store rooms: 5-6 x 11. 
First Floor: — 

Stack room : 40 x 32. 

Reference Library: 10-8 x 11-6. 

Librarian's room : 10-8 x 11-6. 

Men's Reading room : 23-6 x 25-6. 

Ladies' Reading room : 23-6 x 25-6. 

Delivery hall : 17 x 21-8. 

Lavatory : 6-4 x 11-4. 

Lavatory : 6-4 x 11-4. 
Wood used in finishing basement : Georgia pine. 
Wood used in finishing first floor : Red oak. 
Wood used in fittings : Quarter-cut oak. 
Material used in stacks : Metal. 
Height of stacks: 7 ft. 6- in. 

Provision has been made for doubling the capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of site : f 16,852.39. 
Cost of furnishings: |2,147.61. 
Svstem of heating : Steam. 
Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $19,000.00. 

On January 18th, 1902, Mr. Albert Sheldrick, a member of the Library 
Board, wrote Mr. Carnegie, asking for a donation for a new library build- 
ing. The request was complied with on the usual terms. 

Members of Library Board when Library was opened : — 
Dr. Charteris, Chairman; S. M. Smith, J. W. Humphrey, A. Sheldrick, 
F. Stone, I. L. Davis, J. U. Thibodeau, W. J. Twohey. 
Names of the official staff: — 

Dr. Charteris, Chairman; I. L. Davis, Secretary; A. Sheldrick, Treas- 
urer; Mrs. Robinson, Librarian; Miss Edith Barassin, Assistant Librarian. 






1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



257 




i- 
3 



17 ED. 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



CHATHAM 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 




GROUND FLOOR 
PLAN 



17a ed. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 259 



Free access is permitted to the books. 
No age limit. 

Dewey decimal system of classification. 
Card catalogue in use. 

Collin(;wood Public Library. 

Material used in building : Pressed brick. 
'Size of building : — 

Main building: 49 x 55. 

Stack room: 18 x 32-6. 

Height of walls : 21-6. 
Basement : — 

Lobby and entrance: 7 x 31. 

East room : 22-8 x 46-10. Used by Huron Institute. 

West room : 22-8 x 37-4. Not in use at present. 

Furnace room : 14 x 12-6. 

Work room : 14 x 15. 

Corridor: 7 x 48. Divided into small store rooms. 

Men's lavatory : 8-6 x 12-6. 
Main floor : — 

Corridor : 7 x 33. 

Rotunda: 20 x 13. 

General reading room : 23-8 x 32-6. 

Ladies' reading room : 23-8 x 24. 

Stack room : 32-6 x 17. 

Catalogue room : 17-2 x 14. 

Board room : 17-2 x 14. 

Ladies' lavatory : 8-6 x 14-6. 
Wood used for interior finish : Oak. Floors maple and pine. 
Wood used for fittings : Oak. 
Material used for stacks: Oak (pine shelves). 
Height of stacks : About 8 feet. 
Provision made to double capacity of stacks. 
Cost of building, exclusive of lot : $14,500. 

The lot was donated by Mr. Thomas Long, and Mr. John J. Long. 
Cost of furnishings : About $2,000. 
Heating system : Hot water. 
Heating satisfactory. 
Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $14,500. 

Members of the Library Board when Library was opened : — 
Henry Robertson, K.C., Chairman; E. R. Carpenter, Chairman of 
Library Committee; F. W. Churchill, Chairman of Finance Committee; 
W. A. Hogg, D. Wilson, Mayor; M. P. Byrnes, F. B. Gregory, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

Ofiicial Staff: — 

Miss Ella Hilborn, Librarian. 
N. B. Hilborn, Assistant Librarian. 

Free access is allowed to the books in the afternoon, but not in the 
evening. 

Age limit : Twelve years. 
A printed catalogue is used. 



260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



SS.261 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 







Basement P/cin 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 263 



Cornwall Public Library. 



The Secretary of the Library Board was instructed to write Mr. Car- 
negie soliciting a donation towards the erection of a Public Library Build- 
ing in Cornwall. 

Mr. Carnegie in reply expressed himself as willing to agree to the re- 
quest on the condition that the town would grant an annual sum for the 
maintenance, and that he would give a sum equal to ten times the annual 
grant by the town. 

The Library Board consulted with the town council and together agreed 
upon the sum of $700.00 as an annual grant for maintenance. The state- 
ment was forwarded to Mr. Carnegie, and being accepted, a grant of $7,000 
was made. 

Steps were taken to secure plans, etc., tenders were called for and the 
contract awarded. The plans were submitted to Mr. Carnegie, and being 
accepted, the $7,000 was paid as the work progressed. 

The first Board consisted of : — 

Dr. D. O. Alquire, Mayor of Cornwall. 

P. E. Campbell, President. 

J. E. Macdonald, Secretary. 

J. C. Milligen, Treasurer. 

W. Gibbens, J. A. Chisholm, Dr. Maloney, J. Skelton and S. J. Keys, 
OB. A. 

First Flat : — 

Reading room, 13 x 30. 
Reading room, 15 x 18. 
Hall, 9x15. 
Board room, 15 x 12. 
Stack room, 14 x 40. 

Basement : — 

2— (14x40), (30x40). 

Size of library building, 36 x 48. 

Wood used in finishing building. White. 

Wood used in fittings : White. 

Public not admitted to stack room. 

Age limit, 12 years. 

Building cost exclusive of site, $6,000. 

System of heating. Hot water. 

Defect in construction. The Librarian has not full view of the reading 
rooms when at delivery desk. 

The Galt Public Library. 

At the request of the Board, on March 10th, 1902, Mr. James E. Kerr 
wrote to Mr. Carnegie asking for a grant for a Public Library. In reply 
to the request and also to a similar letter written by Mr. R. Alexander, Mr. 
Carnegie promised a grant of $17,500. 

The Town Council of Gait, May 5th, formally accepted Mr. Carnegie's 
offer. A committee was appointed to select a site and a by-law passed au- 
thorizing the purchase of the site chosen. Plans were prepared by Mr. Mel- 
lish, Architect, and tenders secured for the erection of the library building. 
The first Library Board (after completion of the building) : — 
Chairman, R. Alexander. 
Treasurer, E. Radigan. 
Secretary, James E. Kerr. 



264 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Other members of the Board. 

Charles Turnbull. 

William Wallace. 

John H. McGregor. 

Alexander Sloan. 

Louis Lang. 

Mark Mundy, Mayor of Gait. 

Library staff : — 

Miss A. G. Millard, Librarian. 

Miss L. Henderson, Assistant Librarian. 

Divisions of Library building: — 

Basement : — 

Mens' smoking and reading room, 21 x 27. 

Cataloguing room, 18x21. 

Store room, 18x21. 

Boiler room, 13 x 27. 

Hall, 16x49. 

Height of ceilings, 9 ft. 6 in. 

First floor : — 

Stack room, 22 x 46. 
Heading room, 28 x 48. 
Delivery room, 16 x 24. 
Reference room, 14 x 16. 
Librarian's room, 10-6x11. 
Height of ceilings, 16 ft. 

Second floor : — 

Lecture room, 28 x 48. 

Class room, 22x46. 

Board room, 14 x 16. 

Hall, 16x31. 

Height of ceilings, 14 ft. 
Library completed, August, 1905. 
Library opened August 8th, 1905. 

Materials used in building: Brick and Portland cement. 
Size of building: 47x68, inside measurement. 
Wood used for interior finish : Oak. 
Wood used for fittings : Oak. 
Material used for oook stacks : Oak. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 6 in. 
Width of stacks : 20 inches. 

Provision has been made for increasing the capacity of slack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of lot : $22,000. 
Cost of furnishing : f 2,000. 
System of heating : Low pressure steam. 
No defects in heating system. 
Gifts from Mr. Carnegie: |23,000. 

During the winter a Literary Society holds its meetings in one of the 
rooms of the library. A course of public lectures is also held in the lecture 
room . 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



265 




26G 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



267 




GROUND FLOOR PLAN 



PUBLIC LIBRARY ■ GALT 



268 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



GflLT. PUBLIC. LIBRARY. 




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1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



269 



GALT. PUBLIC LIBRARY. 




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SECOND FLOOR PLAN 



270 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Guelph Public Library. 

Library completed : September, 1905. 
Library opened : September 29th, 1905. 
Material used in building : Artificial stone. 
Size of building : 56 x 75. 
Basement : — 

Auditorium, 42 x 57. 

Lecture room, 12x15. 

Work room, 13-6 x 17. 

Sitting room, 10 x 12. 

Furnace room, 12 x 18. 

Gentlemen's dressing room, 8 x 11 

Ladies' dressing room, 12 x 18. 
First floor : — 

Stack room, 28x45. 

Reference room, 9x25. 

Board room, 10 x 26. 

General reading room, 25 x 34. 

Ladies' reading room, 18x25. 
Wood used for interior finish. : Oak. 
Wood used for finish of basement : Georgia pine. 
Wood used for fittings : Oak. 

Material used for stacks : Oak. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 6 in. 

Provision made for enlarging apacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of site : $20,000. 
Cost of furnishings : $4,000. 
System of heating : Hot water. 
Heating satisfactory. 
Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $24,000. 

How gift was secured from Mr. Carnegie : Mr. James Watt communi- 
ted with Mr. Carnegie. The grant was made on the usual terms. 
Names of persons on Library Board when Library was opened : — 

James Watt, E. L. Hill, W. Tytler, B.A., James E. Day, David 
McCrae, Samuel Terrell, F. T. Coglen, D.D.S., William Weir, 
Mayor, Sleeman. 
Names of official staff at time of opening : — 

James Watt, Chairman. 

E. L. Hill, B.A., Secretary. 

William Tytler, B.A., Chairman Book Committee. 

Miss E. M. Davies, Librarian. 

Miss A. Harris, Assistant Librarian. 
Free access is permitted to the books. 
Age limit, 14 years for book borrowers. 
Systems of classification : — 
Dewey decimal. 
Cutter system for fiction. 
Card catalogue in use. 

Special work for children. Two large tables provided with bound vol- 
umes of illustrated periodicals are placed in the general reading room for 
the use of children. 

No defects in the building have been discovered which should be 
be avoided. 



190G 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



271 




272 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 







1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



273 




18 ED. 



274 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Hamilton Public Library. 

Library completed September 29th, 1890. Opened on same date. 
Materials used in building : Brick, stone, iron, slate. 
Size of building : 62-3 x 114-10. 
Rooms on each flat : i — 

Basement, 6 rooms. 

First flat, 3 rooms. 

Second flat, 4 rooms, hall, lavatory. 

Third flat, 7 rooms and 2 halls. 
Basement : size and use of each room : — 

Two rooms used by Fire Underwriters for offices, 17-6 x 24-4, 
19-6 x 24-4. 

Bank of Hamilton for stationery, 35x59. 

Hamilton Association, 1 room, 10x24-6. 

Boiler room, 23-7 x 57-4. 

Store room and lavatory, 24-7 x 57-6. 
First floor : — 

Eeading room and book room, 59-4 x 57. 

Stack room, 33-3x58-3^. 

Board room, 14-4 x 18-9. 
Second flat : — 

Hamliton Association, 1 room for museum, 28x43. 

Hamilton Art School: Office, 12x20-6; Class room, 21-4x25-3; 
Class room, 24-10 x 28-8 ; Class room, 28 x 43 ; Hall and lava- 
tory. 
Third floor: — 

4 Classrooms, 16x16; 15x18; 11x20; 19x25. 

3 Store rooms, 15 x 18 ; 8 x 9 ; 13 x 8 ; 2 halls. 
Wood used for interior finish : Ash and pine. 
Wood used for fittings : Pine. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 8 in. 

No provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of site, $35,350.20. 
Cost of furnishings, $4,319.80. 
System of heating : Steam. 
No defects in heating. 

Names of persons comprising Library Board when Library was opened : 
J. E. O'Reilly, Chairman; D. McLellan (Mayor of City); Rev. Samuel Lyle, 
D.D.; A. Rutherford, F. Walter, F. W. Fearman, W. F. Burton, G. Lynch 
Staunton, C. Layden. 

Official staff at time of opening : — 

R. T. Lancefield, Librarian. 

Miss A. Stewart, Miss M. Hamilton, Mrs. J. Sutherland, Miss J. 
Donald. 
Free access is permitted to all books except fiction. 
Age limit, 14 years. 

System of classification and catalogue : Dewey decimal. 
Use card catalogue and also print lists of new books each month for 
free distribution. 

Special work : Giving' application cards to manufacturers for their 
employees; the! lists of books relating to subjects relating to their line of 
manufacture. 
18a ED. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



275 




The Hamilton Public Library 



276 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Lindsay Public Library. 

Established 1879. 

The new Public Library was opened June 28th, 1904. This represents 
an expenditure of |13,500, the gift of Mr. Carnegie. The site on the Mar- 
ket Park was town property. It is in the centre of a neat expanse of green 
6 ward. 

Mr. E. A. Hardy, B.A., the then Secretary, communicated with Mr. 
Carnegie asking for a grant. Mr. Carnegie's Secretary replied June 23rd, 
1902, stating that $10,000 would be given on the usual conditions. The 
tenders for the building showed a larger sum and Mr. Carnegie increased 
the gift, making the total f 13,500. 

The building is of modern Greek architecture and the main part 27 by 
55 feet. The stack room is 27 by 55 feet, has a capacity of 20,000 volumes, 
and is operated on the open access plan — the public allowed free access to 
the books. 

The basement has a ten foot ceiling. The main portion of the building 
on the ground floor is 14 feet 3 inches high, and the stack room ceiling is 
14 feet 6 inches. The rubble stone for the masonry was obtained at Cobo 
conk, the course ashlar above grade line was obtained at Britnell & Co.'s 
quarries at Burnt River, and cannot be excelled in appearance and quality. 
The brickwork is of red stack brick laid with American bond in brown mor- 
tar. The window sills, architraves, and quorns and columns are of artificial 
stone, which add greatly to the appearance of the building. The fireplaces 
are built of No. 1 red pressed brick. The whole of the carpenter work is of 
clear pine lumber. 

The Basement : — 

Lecture room, Historical Society room, Receiving room, Men's 

lavatory and hall. 
Men's reading and smoking room : 23-6 x 16-6. 
Historical Society room : 23-6 x 16-6. 
Small Closet: 1-6x1-3. 
Small closet: 1-6x1-3. 
Men's lavatory: 9x8-10. 
Store room : 24 x 12. 
Vault: 21-3x8-6. 
Furnace room, 26 x 12-4. 
Coal room: 21-10x8-9. 
First floor : — 

Vesitbule : 8x6. 
Main hall: 20x14-9. 
Children's reading room : 17-6 x 15-2. 
Stack room : 52-6x21 (average). 
Board room : 17 x 8-6. 
Ladies' lavatory : 5 x 5-4. 
Closet: 2x1-9. 

General reading room : £3-9 x 16-9. 
Free access is allowed to books. 
There is no age limit. 
There is no catalogue up to date. 

Cost of building including furniture and furnishings about $13,000, 
exclusive of site. 

The system of heating : Steam. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



277 




278 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




l'IBRARY AT LlATDSAX '. 



PLAN OF GROUND FLOOR 



190G EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 279 



The following are some defects of the library :\ — 

The basement is too deep in the ground, giving the building a low 
appearance, as the site is flat, although slightly terraced immediately around 
the building. 

The smoking room is not properly ventilated. 

The reading room is not large enough to allow for the growth of the 
town. This may be overcome somewhat by throwing the present reading 
room, the main hall and children's room into one general room, extending 
the width of the building. While complete as at present, the plan does not 
seem to admit of further enlargement. 

The heating apparatus was not of sufficient capacity. This has been 
partially remedied by the installation of extra radiators. 

Materials used in finishing : Ash and quarter cut oak. 

Floors in basement : Pine. 

Floors in first flat : Maple. 

Wood used in furnishings : Quarter cut oak. 

Height of stacks, 7 feet. 

Three more stacks can be added. 



London Public Library. 

Completed in 1895, enlarged in 1903. 

Formally opened Nov. 26, 1895. 

Material used : Red pressed brick. 

Size of building : See plans. 

Rooms : 

Basement — Furnace and storerooms, newspaper-file room, assist- 
ants' private room. 
First Floor — General reading room, ladies' reading room, refer- 
ence room, stack room, circulating dept., librarian's office and 
board room, work room. 
Second Floor — Historical Society's Museum, Meeting rooms. 

Wood used for interior finish : Pine, grained. 

Wood used for fittings : Oak. 

Material used for book stacks : Oak. 

Height of stacks : 8 feet. 

Fourteen feet at end of stack room for extending present stacks. 

Cost of building— Original, f 14,354.54; 1903, extension, $5,511.50. 

Cost of furnishings— Original, f 1,676. 16; 1903, extension, $403.83. 

Heating : Reading room, reference rooms, museum, with hot air. Cir- 
culating dept., stack room, office, work room — hot water. 

Assistant's room, work room poorly heated. 

Have had no gifts from Mr. Carnegie. 

No steps have been or will be taken to secure any. 

Members of Board when Library was opened : — 

Robert Reid (Chairman), E. R. Cameron, E. E. Keene, Judge Mac- 
beth, Henry Macklin, Jas. Egan, H. R. Dignan, Mayor Little, 
J. T. Marks. 

Staff, time of opening : Librarian : Mr. J. R. Blackwell. Assistants : 
Misses Mary Gray, Katie McLaughlin, E. Carlotta Leigh. 

Free access is permitted to all books except Fiction. For this an "indi- 
cator" shows whether the book desired is in or out. 



280 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 





M In 





The London Public Library. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



281 




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284 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Age limit is 12 years. 

System of classification and cataloguing : Dewey. 

Card catalogue in Author, Title, and class is used. Printed catalogue 
and numerical lists of Fiction only. 
No special work for children. 
No provision made for juvenile department. 



The Carnegie Public Library, Ottawa. 

The first definite step taken for founding a Free Public Library was that 
of the Ottawa women in the early part of 1895. To attain this end the Com- 
mittee obtained the co-operation of the Evening Journal. The proprietor 
generously placed his paper at the disposal of the ladies for a "Woman's 
Issue." The following were the principal officers of the staff: 

Editor — Annie Howells Frechette. 

Managing Editor — Mary McKay Scott. 

News Editor — Ellie Cronin. 

City Editor— Eoberta E. Tilton. 

Sporting Editor — Laura K. Masson. 

Editor Home Department — Elizabeth Brymner. 

The leading article on C( A Public Library," was contributed by Marie 
W. Klotz. The paper was issued April 13th, 1895, and a profit of f500.00 
realized. To secure municipal assistance a by-law was submitted in 
January, 1896. The by-law was defeated. 

Under the Act of 1895 the Municipal Council appointed the following 
Library Board: — 

The three appointed by the Council were W. Y. Soper, B. Suite, Otto J. 
Klotz; those appointed by the Public School Board were A. W. Fleck, E. 
Seybold, and J. S. Durie; and those by the Separate School Board, R. J. 
Sims, and F. E. E. Campeau. 

The Library Board met for the first time on July 2nd, 1897, when A. 
W. Fleck was appointed Chairman, and R. J. Sims Secretary. 

The Library Board succeeded in having a library by-law presented to the 
Council for adoption prior to submitting it to the electors for ratification. But 
when it came up for a second reading on December 4th, 1899, it was de- 
feated. Seeing no prospects in th.e near future for obtaining a public library 
for Ottawa, Dr. Klotz, who continued to be a member of the Library Board 
from its inception, took courage after months of hesitation in applying to 
an alien philanthropist to ask for a donation in that behalf. By a strange 
coincidence W. D. Morris, then Mayor, wrote on the following day to Mr. 
Carnegie on the same subject. 

The Mayor received a reply on March 11th, 1901, as follows: — 
"Mayor W. D. Morris, 

Ottawa. 
"Dear Sir — 

"Yours of 23rd received. If the City of Ottawa will furnish a site, and 
agree through council to tax itself to the extent of not less than $7,500 a 
year for maintenance of the library, I shall be glad to give $100,000 for a 
free library building. 

Very truly yours, 

Andrew Carnegie" 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 285 



On the 15th April, 1901, the council accepted the gift of Mr. Carnegie. 
Library Committee, 1906 : — 

Alderman Napoleon Champagne, Chairman. 

His Worship, the Mayor. 

Alderman Alfred W. Desjardins. 

Alderman Charles Hopewell. 

Alderman E. J. Laverdure. 

Alderman J. Harold Putman, B.A. 

Alderman S. Rosenthal. 

Alderman Daniel Storey. 

Alderman George H. Wilson. 

John C. Glashan, Esq., LL.D. 

James F. White, Esq., LL.D. 

William J. Sykes, Esq., B.A. 
Staff, 1906: — 

Librarian, Lawrence J. Burpee. 

Cataloguer, Miss Ruby Rothwell. 

Reference Assistant, Adelard E. Proulx. 

Circulating Department — Miss Barbara McDonald, Miss B. Suth- 
erland, Miss B. Watt, Mdme. Cusson, Miss G. Major. 
Name of Library : Carnegie Library, Ottawa. 
When completed : April, 1906. 
When opened: April 30th, 1906. 

Material used in building: Indiana limestone and local freestone. 
Wood used for interior finish : Golden oak. 
Wood used for fittings : Golden oak. 
Material used for book stacks : Steel. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 

Special work for children : A children's room with suitable books. 
Other special work : Co-operation with schools and local societies. 
Dimensions of rooms in basement: — 

Newspaper room : 40x21. 

Classroom: 39-6x21. 

Unpacking room : 27 x 26. 

Bindery: 17x16. 

Fuel room : 17 x 9. 

Janitor's room;: 23x18. 

Boiler and fan room: 37x19. 

Men's lavatory: 18x12. 

Women's lavatory : 18 x 12. 

Second floor: — 

Museum: 38-6x25. 
Outside dimensions of building : 115 x 105-4. 
Dimensions of rooms on ground floor : — 

Reading room : 40 x 22. 

Cataloguing room : 19 x 12. 

Ladies' room : 19 x 12. 

Delivery room : 28 x 36. 

Vestibule, hall and stairs : 36 x 18. 

Librarian's room : 19 x 12. 

Reception room : 19 x 12. 

Children's room: 40x22. 

Stack room : 28 x 48. 



286 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




190fi 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



287 



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288 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Dimensions of rooms on first floor: — 
Reference room : 40 x 22. 
Ladies' rest room : 19 x 12. 
Study: 18x12. 
Board room : 19 x 18. 
Dressing room : 21 x 5-6. 
Stack room: 28x48. 
Basement : — 

Newspaper room, corresponding room in opposite wing imassigned, 
caretaker's room, furnace room, lavatories, storage room, un- 
der stack room, unpacking room, bindery room (at present used 
for book storage). 
Main floor : — 

Reading room, Children's room, Cloak room, Study room, Librar- 
ian's office, cataloguing room, stack room, in a separate wing 
arranged for three stories of steel stacks, capacity about 100,- 
000 books. 
Third story : — 

Museum. 
Open shelves in the reading room, the reference room and the children's 
room, but not free access to the stack room. 

No age limit. Under 12 years classed as juvenile. 

Cutter's expansive classification. Card catalogue arranged as a Dic- 
tionary Catalogue, to be supplemented by printed lists from time to time. 
Cost of building : f 100,000. 
Cost of site : |21,000. 

Gifts received from Mr. Carnegie: f 100,000. 
System of heating : Hot air. ; 

The building is well arranged, but not for economical administration. 
With the present appropriation the building is not satisfactory. It re- 
quires a staff of ten or twelve. The present staff is inadequate. 

The heating system was a mistake. Hot air is ruinous to books, par- 
ticularly in the stack room, both because of its direct effect upon them and 
also by reason of the dust which is carried through the flues from room to 
room and deposited on the books. 

Paris Public Library. 

Library completed : 1904. 

Library opened : July 27th, 1904. 

Materials used in building : Brick, stone trimmings, slate roof. 

Size of building : 57 x 40. 

Basement : Unfinished ; one room used for repairing. 

First Floor: — 

One large room used as reading room and library combined; small 
room 10 x 12, used as Committee room. 
Wood used for interior finish : Southern pine. 
Wood used for fittings : Quarter-cut oak. 
Materials used for stacks : Pine. 

Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building exclusive of lot : f 10,000. 

Cost of furnishings : $900.00, including stacks removed from old li 
brary. 

System of heating : Hot air. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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290 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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No defects observed in heating up to present. 

The Rev. Canon Brown, Chairman of the old Paris Library Board, in 
his private capacity, wrote to Mr. Carnegie asking for a gift of |7,000 for 
a new libary building in Paris. He received a reply stating that not less 
than $10,000 would be given on the usual conditions. 

Names of persons on Library Board when library was opened : — 

Henry Stroud, Mayor; Eev. Canon Brown, Rev. J. E. Crinion, 
Dr. W. Burt, W. N. Bell, M. Ryan, J. Smiley, A. H. Baird, 
Paul G. Wickson, Hon. Sec.-Treas. 
Name of official staff at time of opening : — 

E. Reynett, Librarian. 
Free access to books is permitted. 
Age limit : 14 years. 
Manuscript catalogue in use. 

Sarnia Public Library. 

Library completed and formally opened November 26th, 1903. 
The building is of stone and pressed brick with cut stone trimmings, a 
metal dome and slate roof. 

Size of building : 65 x 80. 
The basement : — 

Auditorium : 32 x 42. 

Men's smoking room : 19 x 19. 

Men's lavatory. 

Cloak room. 

Furnace room. 

Coal room. 

Storage room : 22 x 22. 

Large room (not yet in use) : 54 x 33. 
Main floor : — 

General reading room : 32 x 19. 

Children's room : 19 x 20. 

Board room : 19 x 12. 

Rotunda : 22 x 22. 

Librarian's office. 

Ladies' lavatory. 

Stack and reference room : 54 x 30. 
Interior finish and fittings : Oak. 
Floors : Maple. 
Book stacks : Steel. 

Height of stacks: 8 ft., except in Childrn's room where they are low 
and the cases oak. 

Provision was made in original plan for increasing capacity of stack 
room. 

Cost of building, exclusive of site : $20,000. 
Cost of furniture (special library design) : f 1,500. 
System of heating : Hot water, with grates in several rooms. 
Heating system satisfactory. 

The auditorium may be used by any body of a public or semi-public 
nature, without charge. The Historical Society, The Children's Aid So- 
ciety, The Medical Association, The Camera Club and other Societies regu- 
larly meet in this room. 

The Smoking room is supplied with newspapers and tables for chess 
and checkers are provided. 



292 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



293 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 






First Floor Plan 



294 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 295 



The Children's room contains all books for juveniles on shelves around 
the walls. These books are taken for reading in the room without the inter- 
vention of any attendant, or if desired for home use, the book is taken to 
the Librarian's counter and charged. In this room the chairs and tables 
are graduated in size so as to accommodate children of all ages. The walls 
are hung with pictures and the tables are supplied with children's maga- 
zines and periodicals. The librarian's counter projects into the rotunda, 
thus giving him supervision of all the rooms on the main floor. 

The Board room is used for small public meetings when it is not neces- 
sary to use the auditorium. The Medical Association has its library on 
shelves around the walls of this room. 

The west wing of the stackroom is used for reference books. 

The width of the aisles between the stacks is five feet. 

Chairs and tables are provided for those desiring to read in the stack 
room. 

In 1902, the Library Board, through the Mayor, applied to Mr. Car- 
negie for a grant for a Library building. The request was complied with, 
and $15,000 given. In 1905, a second grant of $5,000 was secured for en- 
larging the stack room. 

Library Board at time of opening of library : — 

R. J. Mc Arthur, Chairman; J. J. Spereman, Secretary; Mayor 
Barr, Rev. J. R. Hall, Robert McAdams, H. W. Mills, D. D. 
Moshier, M. Sullivan and Norman Gurd. 

Official staff : — 

William Sweet, Librarian. 

Patricia Spereman, Assistant Librarian. 

Arthur Payne, Janitor. 

Free access to the books is permitted. 

No age limit exists, but children cannot become members without con- 
sent of parents. 

System of classification : Dewey decimal. 

Card catalogue. 

Special attention is devoted to library work for children. 

Books suitable for children in every department of literature have 
been freely purchased. The assistant librarian has been given special charge 
of children's work. 

A story hour has been inaugurated by the children's librarian. 

Stories are told to the children so as to interest them in great men, or 
events, and in nature study, science, etc. The children are told what books 
are in the library dealing with the subject of the story, and encouraged to 
read for themselves. 

The policy of the Board has not been to send out Travelling Libraries ta 
the schools, but to bring the children to the library. 

The Board has secured the co-operation of the teachers who make lists 
suitable for the different forms. Copies of these lists are given to the chil- 
dren's librarian, and to the scholars in each form, and form part of the school 
curriculum. 

The Library Board publish reviews of important books in the town 
papers. 

Bulletins are issued of books on important subjects. 

No fees are collected for cards. 

Any resident of the Town on signing an application may become a mem- 
ber without a guarantor, whether he is a property owner or not. 

Two books may be drawn at a time, provided only one is fiction. 



296 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 297 



Smith's Falls Public Library. 

In January, 1902, Mr. G. F. McKim, who had been an active member of 
the Library Board for several years, wrote to Mr. Andrew Carnegie asking 
for a gift of $10,000 to aid in the erection of a new library building. The 
request was granted upon the usual conditions. Mr. McKim then inter- 
viewed Mr. C. B. Frost and the Hon. F. T. Frost. These gentlemen 
offered to donate $10,000 in twenty annual payments of $500 each towards 
the maintenance. Mr. W. H. Frost also offered $100 a year for 20 years 
for the same purpose, and Mr. Carnegie's gift was increased to $11,000. 
The propositions were accepted by the Town Council. Plans were prepared 
in 1903 by Mr. G. M. Bayly, Architect, and the building was completed 
during the year under the supervision of Senator Frost, Mr. H. A. Lavell 
and Mr. McKim acting as Building Committee. The library was formally 
opened on the 25th of February, 1904. On the 28th of April, 1906, Mr. 
Carnegie visited the library and expressed himself as greatly pleased with 
it. He pronounced the building the handsomest small library which he 
had seen. 

Material used in building : Stone basement with superstructure of 
pressed brick, trimmed throughout with white wood. 

Size of building: 57 x 51. 

Rooms in basement : Recreation room, 14 x 42 ; janitor's apartments, 
including kitchen, dining room, bedroom, parlor and bathroom, boiler room 
and store room. 

Rooms on First Flat : — Reading room, 15 x 43; reading room, 17 x 18; 
rotunda, 18 x 18 ; Board room and a ladies' waiting room. 

Rooms on Second Flat: — A hall, seating capacity of 200. 

Wood used for interior finish : White wood, stained. 

Material used for stacks : White wood. 

Provision has been made for increasing the capacity of stack room. 

Cost of building exclusive of lot: $11,000. 

Cost of furnishings: $900. 

System of heating : Hot water. 

Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $11,000. 

Names of persons on Librarv Board when library was opened : 

G. F. McKim, A. G. Farrell, H. A. Lavell, J. A. Houston, F. 
Whitcomb, W. J. Keith, R. J. Brodie, S. W. Gilroy. 

Names of official staff at time of opening : — 
Edith Sutton, Librarian. 
F. Shepherd, Janitor. 

Is free access to the books permitted? No, 

Is there an age limit? No. 



St. Mary's Public Library. 

Library completed : July 18th, 1905. 

Formally opened : August, 1905. 

Material used in building : St. Mary's limestone. 

Size of building : 50 x 40. 

Basement : 

Store room, 15 x 36. 

Furnace room, 12 x 28. 

Fuel room : 15 x 15. 

Waiting room : 15 x 20. 



298 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



299 






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300 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



First Floor: — 

Reading room: 17 x 25. 
Board room : 9 x 13. 
Stack room : 8 x 12. 
Hall : 11 x 24. 

Second Floor : — 

One room. 
Wood used for interior finish : Oak. 
Wood used for fittings : Oak-mission. 
Material used for stacks: Oak. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 

Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building exclusive of lot : $8,961. 
Cost of furnishings: $1,057. 
System of heating : Hot air. 
Gifts from Mr. Carnegie, $10,000. 

On the 8th of February, 1904, the Town Council passed a resolution 
asking for a gift of $10,000 from Mr. Carnegie. The request was granted 
upon the usual terms. 

Members of Library Board when library was opened : — 

H. L. Eice, S. K. Martin, J. Sclater, D. Currie, J. Egan, E. S. 
Box, E. Graham, J. Eobert. 
Names of official staff: — 

H. L. Eice, Chairman. 

J. Eobert, Secretary. 

Lottie King, Librarian. 
Frefe access to the books is not permitted. 
Age limit, 14 years. 
Printed catalogue. 

St. Thomas Public Library. 

In 1902, Mr. W. H. Murch, President of the Board of Trade, communi- 
cated with Mr. Carnegie, through his agent, as to his willingness to make 
a grant for the building of a new library, and received a favorable reply. 
The Public Library Board accordingly made a formal application to Mr. 
Carnegie. 

In May, 1903, the agreement with Mr. Carnegie came before the City 
Council for ratification, and the terms were formally accepted. In the same 
year a building lot was purchased to the rear of the City Hall, and during 
1904 and 1905 the buiding was erected. Mr. Carnegie's grant amounted to 
$27,000— $25,000 for the building and $2,000 for the furnishings. 

On February 10th, 1906, the new Library Building was formally op- 
ened, and addresses were delivered by members of the Board, prominent 
citizens, and representatives from other libraries. 

At the time of the formal opening the Library Board consisted of the 
following members: — 

His Worship, Mayor Lawrence. 

Geo. Crocker, Esq., Chairman. 

0. J. Stevenson, M.A., D. Paed, Secretary. 

D. Ferguson, Esq. 

Samuel Price, Esq. 

C. W. Eegan, Esq. 






1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



801 







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302 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




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D. W. Newcombe, Esq. 
A. Killingsworth, Esq. 
T. B. Wright, Esq. 
The officers consisted of : — 

Mrs. A. C. MacDonald, Librarian. 

Miss K. Frazer, Assistant. * 

Shortly after the opening of the library Mr. T. B. Wright, having 
previously resigned from the Board, was appointed caretaker of the library, 
and Mr. W. H. Murch was appointed by the City Council to fill the vacancy 
on the Board. 

Rooms on each floor and their uses : — 

Basement : Two halls, lavatory, and five other rooms, viz. — 
The auditorium, capable of seating 300 persons. Meetings of an 
educational character only are permitted. A small fee is 
charged for the use of the room, to cover cost of lighting. 
The auditorium was first used on February 23rd, 1906, two 
weeks after the opening of the library, for a lecture by the 
Canadian poet, William Wilfrid Campbell. 
Two rooms set apart for a museum. 
Two rooms intended for furnace rooms, but now used as rooms 

for storing, unpacking, etc. 
Ground floor : Vestibule, hall, lavatory, mam corridor and five 

other rooms, viz. — 
The magazine room and general reading room. 
The stack room. 

The news-room, for daily and weekly papers only. 
The reference room. 
Typewriter and repairing room. 

First floor : Cloak room and Board room situated directly above 
the Reference room. The Board room has a balcony looking 
out over the main corridor, stack room and reading room. 
Free access given to the books, except fiction. 

Age limit : Nominally children under twelve are not permitted to take 
out books, but in reality the matter is left to the discretion of the librarian. 
From |50.00 to f 100.00 per year is granted for the purchase of books for 
use in the Collegiate and Public Schools. 

System of classification and cataloguing : Our librarian was this sum- 
mer sent to Boston, Mass., to learn the Dewey System, and "this system is 
now being introduced. We intend to have a printed catalogue for the books 
in fiction, and an indicator to show whether they are in or out. Books in 
fiction will be numbered according to the Cutter table. For books other 
than fiction we intend to use the Card Catalogue and the Dewey classifica- 
tion. 

Cost of building, exslusive of site: f 25, 000 for the building; $2,000 
for the furnishings; $27,000 in all. 

Library completed : December, 1905. 

Formally opened : February 9th, 1906. 

Materials used in building : Buff brick with stone facings. 

Wood used in inferior finish : Black ash. 

Wood used in fittings : Golden oak. 

Material used for stacks : Steel. 

Height of stacks : 7 feet 4 inches. 

Provision has been made for increasing the capacity of stack room. 

Gifts from Mr. Carnegie : $27,000. 






1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 305 



Lighted by electricity. 

System of heating: The building is heated with exhaust steam from 
the city gas works. 

The following newspaper clipping will explain the system in further 
detail : — 

The city of St. Thomas has just installed a system of heating for the 
Public Library and the City Hall by utilizing the exhaust steam from 
the Street Railway engines at the power house, which is now a waste 
product. The system is as follows: — The exhaust steam is carried through 
a heater which is filled with small corrugated tubes, these tubes being filled 
with water. In passing through this heater the water is heated to a tem- 
perature the same as the steam. Then by means of a force pump it is forced 
through a main pipe four inches in diameter to the buildings, where it is 
attached to the mains and the radiators in the buildings. 

" There is also a return pipe which carries the water back after passing 
through the radiators, when it is again heated either by the speed of the 
pump or by control valves placed on the mains as they enter each building. 
The 4 in. mains and the return pipe which carry heat to the buildings are 
laid underground. They are covered with asbestos wool to prevent the heat 
escaping, and then wrapped with hemp packing and enclosed in a 12-inch 
vitrified tile with cement joints. The saving of this system will be prac- 
tically the whole cost of heating the buildings with coal. There will also 
be the saving of the labor attending the firing of the furnaces." 

Defects in the present building: The only defect that we have 
yet noticed is that the newspaper room is not quite large enough. 

Stratford Public Library. 

Library completed : September, 1903. 

Material used in building: Red brick, stone foundations. 

Size of buildings : 53 x 62. 

The basement : — 

Janitor's residence, furnace room and coal bins, storage room. 

First flat: — 

Reading room : 22.6 x 50.6. 
Central delivery hall : 21 x 17. 
Stack room : 25 x 27. 
Reference room : 27 x 10. 
Children's reading room: 21| x 14J. 

The rooms are separated by grills and glass so that both reading 
rooms are under the eye of the librarian* at the delivery desk. 

Second flat : — 

Auditorium : 27 x 58. 

Board room : 21 J x 15. 

Special room : 36 x 18. 
Cost of building exclusive of site : f 14,600. 
Cost of fittings : f 500. 
System of heating : Steam. 
Heating satisfactory. 
Wood used in finishing building: Ash. 
Wood used in fittings: Ash. 

Grant from Mr. Carnegie : $15,000. - 

20 E. 



306 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




20a E. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



307 



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EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 311 



The correspondence with Mr. Carnegie was taken charge of by Mr. E. 
T. Orr, Chairman of the Library Board. 
The Board for 1902: — 

J. Steele, Chairman; E. T. Orr, Secretary; J. E. Stuart, W. J. 
Ferguson, H. A. Barker, J. O'Loane, J. A. Devlin, J. Stamp, 
Mayor. 
Library Board for 1903: — 

J. E. Stuart, Chairman; E. T. Orr, Secretary; the remainder of the 
board being the same as in 1902, with the exception that W. 
Hepburn replaced Mr. Stamp as Mayor. 
Librarian : Miss L. Johnston. 
Assistant Librarian : Mrs. E. Eobertson. 
Free access is permitted to all books except fiction. 
Age limit : 12 years. 

Classification : — 

In printed catalogues under 30 heads. The shelf grouping is in 12 
sections, biography, poetry and religion being classified by 
author, history and travel by country alphabetically, physics 
and science by sub-section under title. The Dewey system will 
replace the present system at an early date. 



Waterloo Public Library. 

Up to 1903 the Library and Eeading Eoom had its quarters in a part of 
the Market building. It served the purpose well in the early years, but had 
become totally inadequate. A request was preferred to the Town Council for 
better accommodation, which it was found impossible to give without erect- 
ing a separate building. The Mayor then communicated with Mr. Carnegie 
and asked upon what conditions he made grants for the erection of libraries. 
Mr. Carnegie replied that the grants were made on conditions that the town 
furnish a free site and guarantee to spend annually in the maintenance of the 
Library, an amount equal at least to one-tenth of the sum granted. The mat- 
ter was then brought before the Board of Trade and it was decided to make 
a requisition for f 10,000, and a recommendation was sent on to the Town 
Council to pass the necessary by-law to guarantee free site and to spend at 
least $1,000 annually in maintenance of the Library. A certified copy of this 
by-law, together with a statement of the town's population and assessment 
and the leading facts about the Public Library were forwarded to Mr. Car- 
negie and a grant of $10,000 was made. 

The first Library Board after the Library was completed was : — 

David Bean, Chairman; C. A. Haehnel, Secretary; J. G. Stroh, W. 

H. Eiddell, Eev. Father Spetz, George Cork, Eev. E. A. 

Schultz, Peter Fischer, and the Mayor of the town. 
Emma B. Eoos, Librarian. 
Library completed : September 1st, 1905. 
Library opened : November 6th, 1905. 
Material used in building : Stone and brick. 
Size of building : 54 x 44. 

The number of rooms on each flat including uses to which they are put. 
Basement : — 



312 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




190<> 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



313 



Mill 



I "ll 



' „ E=l M NM t==\ t=l E=3 P=J ' 




314 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




Public Libr^y 

AT 

ftfaTERLOO 



Second Flooh Plait — 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 315 



First floor: — 

General reading room: 25x21. 
Vestibule: 25x13. 
Children's room : 25 x 16. 
Reference room: 15x11. 
Librarian's room : 17 x 15. 

Second floor : — 

Board room : 14 x 12. 

Vestibule: 12x12. 

Hall : 51 x 28 (all in one room). 
Wood used for interior finish : Ash. 
Wood used for fittings : Ash. 
Material used for stacks: Ash. 
Height of stacks : 7 ft. 

Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room. 
Cost of building, exclusive of lot: $9,253.75. 
Cost of furnishing: $1,401.34. 
Free access is not given to books. 
Age limit : 12 years. 

System of classification and cataloguing: Dewey decimal. 
System of heating : Hot air. 
The heating system might be improved. 
Special work : A catalogue for children. 

Windsor Public Library. 

Mr. Andrew Braid began correspondence with Mr. Andrew Carnegie 
with a view to his donating funds for a new Library, the frame building 
which had done duty since the formation of the library having become en- 
tirely inadequate. The correspondence resulted in Mr. Carnegie offering 
$25,000 on the conditions he usually stipulates as to a free site and appropri- 
ation of an annual sum for proper maintenance of the Library. The offer 
was laid before the City Council and accepted; a site was selected and pur- 
chased, and the new building (erected from plans drawn by John Scott & Co., 
architects, Detroit, Mich.) was opened on the 16th of October, 1903, the cere- 
mony being performed by the Hon. Richard Harcourt in his capacity of 
Minister of Education. Mr. Carnegie later on made a further donation of 
$2,000, bringing the contribution up to $27,000. 

The members of the Library Board of Management at the time of the 
opening were as follows : — J. E. D' Avignon, Chairman of the Board; Andrew 
Braid, Secretary of the Board; A. P. E. Panet, Chairman of the Building 
Committee; and Rev. J. C. Tolmie, W. S. Cody, John E. Gow, John Con- 
nelly and A. F. Coulter. Librarians were : Miss Honora Watson, with Miss 
F. Eva McCrae and Miss Anna Watson for assistants. 

Library completed : October 10th, 1903. 

Library opened: October 16th, 1903. 

Materials used in building : Brick with stone facings. 

Size of building: 92.4x63.7. 

Wood used for interior finish: Red oak and hard maple. 

Wood used for fittings : Oak. 

Material used for stacks : Steel. 

Height of stacks : 7 ft. 6 in. 



316 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



817 




318 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 310 



Provision has been made for increasing capacity of stack room, 

Cost of building, exclusive of lot : $25,000. 

Cost of furnishings : $1,600. 

Free access is given to stack room and reference room. 

Age limit : 16 years. Librarian is given discretionary powers. 

System of classification : Dewey decimal. 

System of heating : Low pressure steam. 

Basement : — 

Auditorium : 24.6 x 53. 
Fuel room : 23 x 16J. 
Boiler room : 15 x 16J. 
Storage room: 14.10J x 16.1LJ. 
Storage room : 9.9J x 18.10. 
Committee room : 12.9 x 16J. 
First floor : — 

Entrance: 10.6x11. 

Delivery room: 11.6x53. 

General reading room : 23 x 53. • 

Reference room : 15 x 22.6. 

Librarian's room : 10 x 13. 

Stack room : 23 J x 53. 

Ladies' reading room: 10x18.10. 

Second flat : — 

Board room : 15 x 22.6. 



APPENDIX I.— REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN OF THE 
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 

To the Honour able E.' A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., M.P.P., 
Minister of Education for the Province of Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Library 
of the Education Department for the year 1906. 

The number of books loaned during the year as contained in the follow- 
ing Table is 7,208, being 300 more than in 1905, an increase of about 5 per 
cent. 

The Library loaned 23 books each week day in the year, the books remain- 
ing out for two weeks at a time. 

It is gratifying to be able to report that not a single book has been lost 
during the past year. 

For many years the Teachers residing in Toronto have enjoyed the privi- 
lege of taking out books from the Library relating to the various branches 
of education in which they were specially interested. Many advantages, I 
have no doubt, accrued to them through this privilege, of which they were 
sensibly appreciative. I am now issuing books to two teachers who, while 
actively engaged in teaching, are studying with- a view to improving their 



320 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



professional status. In both cases the books are being returned regularly 
and in good order. Taking this as an example it might fairly be assumed 
that there are many others who would avail themselves of the benefits of the 
Library to advance their educational standing if they but knew that some of 
the necessary books could be obtained from its shelves. Of course no Refer- 
ence Books are allowed to be taken from the Library. 

My last year's Report gave a list of the Educational works and their 
Authors which were added to the Library; this year a similar list is given. 

Number of Books loaned, 1897-1906 : 



Books given out in 
the month of — 



January .... 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September. . 
October . . . 
November . . 
December . . 

Totals 



1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


699 


608 


484 


526 


1,370 


928 


868 


948 


1,702 


1,393 


1,158 


1,454 


1,111 


882 


848 


766 


923 


969 


895 


. 911 


609 


677 


518 


540 


254 


265 


256 


231 


184 


233 


329 


224 


514 


410 


489 


432 


1,200 


1,043 


1,018 


1,312 


1,099 


1,024 


1,034 1,229 


704 


464 


549 


547 


10,369 


8,896 


8,446 


9,120 



1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


518 


542 


587 


673 


646 


1,124 


959 


1,036 


970 


848 


1,563 


1,084 


1,538 


978 


777 


997 


1,187 


899 


854 


497 


867 


832 


901 


738 


7z3 


576 


510 


591 


482 


317 


317 


336 


168 


220 


296 


176 


233 


152 


259 


260 


411 


538 


476 


378 


446 


1,058 


958 


761 


776 


661 


1,014 


1,158 


687 


900 


962 


516 


535 


600 


480 


475 


9,137 


8,872 


8,396 


7,708 


6,908 



1906 



714 
877 
1,042 
578 
853 
31V 
344 
203 
401 
616 
776 
485 

7,208 



Number and Subjects of the Books Purchased in the Years 1897-1906 : 



Year. 

1897.. 

1898 . 

1899. . 

1900.. 

1901.. 

1902. 

1903.. 

1904.. 

1905.. 

1906.. 



Volumes. Subjects. 


476 ^ 




533 




315 


Education. 


275 


Science. 


164 1 


Literature. 


304 


Art. 


218 


Text-books. 


409 


Miscellaneous 


486 




548 J 





Regarding the books purchased during 1906 the largest increase is in 
fiction, which calls for a word or two of explanation. While I have no 
desire whatever to stimulate Novel reading in general, I consider that the 
reading of a good, well written story is wholesome mental recreation, and 
therefore think it reasonable that the standard works in the Department of 
Fiction should be available for the teachers in training who have little time at 
their disposal to visit the Public Library ; besides most of them are strangers 
in the city, and hesitate to ask a mere casual acquaintance to stand sponsor for 
them for the safe return of the books. We have a fair supply of fiction on 
hand, and therefore with the usual supervision of the librarian and with 
ordinary care on the part of the borrower, there need be but few additions 
to this branch of the Library for some years to come. i \* 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



321 



The Number of Books Purchased in 1902-1906 was as follows : 



Subjects. 



Pedagogy 

Science (Political Economy, Anthropology, etc. ) 

Philosophy, Ethics and Religion 

Industrial and Domestic Science 

Poetry 

Fiction and Practical Life 

Literature 

Text-Books 

Miscellaneous (History, Biography, Reference Works) 

Natural History and Nature Studv 

Arts * 



1902 



40 

11 

9 

8 

1 

9 

46 

45 

102 

33 



1903 1904 



3 
8 
6 

10 
19 
35 
27 
61 
27 
15 



Totals. 



18 
10 
17 
24 
13 
79 
92 
37 
84 
20 
15 



1905 



30 
32 
13 
66 
5 

37 
70 
84 
119 
25 
5 



1906 



22 

17"" 

18 

30' 

16 
198 

11 

70 1 
119 

28 

19 



304 218 409 486 548 



As to the number of books donated to the Library during the past year 
it will be seen there is a decided increase in Text-books. This is owing 
to the gift of 292 books by The Macmillan Co. of Canada, Limited, 27 Rich- 
mond St. West, Toronto. The subjects dealt with in these Texts include 
History, Geography, Nature Study, Grammar and Composition, Science, 
Manual Arts and Domestic Science, English Classics, annotated, and a 
valuable collection of Texts on methods and Aids for Teachers in the teach- 
ing of Mathematics, Geography, History, Language, Science, etc. 

The above Firm as Agents for Messrs. Adam and Charles Black have 
added to the latter firm's publications some very interesting and instructive 
books. 

Number of Books donated to the Library 1899-1906 : 






1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


Text-Books . . 


74 


65 

7 


111 

13 


41 
54 


144 

95 


349 
16 


95 

37 


326 


Miscellaneous 


177 








Totals 


74 


72 


124 


95 


239 


365 


132 


503 







Newspapers and Magazines Received during the Tears 1900-1906 : 



1901 


1902 


1903 1904 


1905 


1906 


Number of daily and weekly newspapers received .... 
Number of magazines and other periodicals received 


91 
102 


88 
100 


89 109 
111 ! 94 


126 

98 


90. 
102 


Totals 


193 


188 


200 203 


224 


192 





The noticeable increase in the number of books, magazines, etc., bound 
during the year is thus accounted for : For more than twelve months I have 
been endeavoring to complete broken volumes of Educational Journals, 
Reports, and Magazines and am glad to say that I have been successful 
beyond my expectations. The work has entailed a great deal of correspond- 
ence, but the result fully warrants all the trouble involved. The gentle- 
men with whom I corresponded sent me most courteous replies and where pos- 



21 ED. 



322 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



sible the Reports, etc., were forwarded. The Library has now added to its 
shelves the following Reports complete and bound, in addition to Educa- 
tional Journals and Magazines : 

Reports, Toronto Public Schools, 1850 to 19u4. 

Reports, Dominion Educational Association, 1892 to 1904. 

Reports, Ontario Educational Association, 1865 to 1906. 

Reports on Education for Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince 
Edward Island and British Columbia. 

Reports, Ontario Institution for Deaf and Dumb, 1871 to 1903. 

Records of the Ontario Historical Society. 

University of Toronto Monthly. 

Addresses and Proceedings of National Teachers' Association, U. S., 
1858 to 1905, with the exception of the proceedings of the 8th, 9th, 10th and 
11th Annual Meetings, which I hope to get in a comparatively short time. 





Books 


, Magazines 


, etc. 


, Bound during the Years 1894-1906 : 




1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


1899 


1900 


1901 


1902 


1 903 


1904 


1905 


1906 


136 


141 


98 


99 


90 


94 


37 


83 


71 


4 


81 


45 


217 



Official Reports on Education in different Countries received during 
1902-1906 : 



1902 1903 



Great Britain and Ireland 

Various Provinces of the Dominion. . . 
Australasia — 

Victoria 

New South Wales 

South Australia 

Western Australia 

Queensland 

Tasmania 

New Zealand 

Other British Possessions : 

Cape of Good Hope 

Natal 

Jamaica 

Cape Town 

Barbadoes 

British Guiana 

Newfoundland 

Transvaal 

Various States of the American Union. 
Miscellaneous : 

Argentine Republic 

Uruguay 

France 

Germany 

Portugal 

Switzerland 

Italy 

Mexico 

Japan 



Total* 



43 

42 

5 
3 

1 
1 



54 



12 



2 

6 

29 

1 



248 



53 

45 



81 

10 
5 
4 
1 
2 
2 

16 



1904 1905 1906 



59 
31 

2 
3 

1 
1 
2 
2 
26 

2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
65 



263 I 217 



26 
31 

4 
3 



10 

1 
2 

1 
1 
1 



1 
55 

3 

2 
2 

10 
2 



55 
34 

2 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

17 

1 
1 
1 

1 



97 

1 

1 
4 

2 



160 226 



21a ED. 



i9w; 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



323 



Miscellaneous Pamphlets Received 


in 1902-1906: 








1902 


1903 1QrY1 


1 905 1 906 






x„ V x 




From vaiious Countries 

From the Dominion of Canada and its Provinces 


75 
74 


65 
53 


12 

27 


7 
46 


11 
31 


Totals 




149 


118 


39 


53 


42 







Very little idea prevails as to the extent this Library is used by the teach- 
ing profession and the general public, and in order to bring this to your 
notice a record has been kept from day to day during the last ten months 
of thd visitors, with the result shown in the following table. By far the 
larger portion of the callers consult the Reference works, of which the Lib- 
rary has a valuable collection, and these are being added to each year as the 
Legislative Grant permits. 

Visitors Consulting Reference Books : 



759 













2 








< 


3 


June. 


-i' 

-2 


August 


Septem 


Octobe 


6 

0> 

> 

o 


s 

8 

A 


441 


765 


481 


875 


984 


1,202 


936 


746 


356 



,545 









Visitors taking ou1 


Books 


: 






























March. 


ft 

< 




June. 




w 


CJD 

< 


September 


s 

o 

o 


03 

a 

> 
o 



A 


Total. 


676 


365 


553 


190 206 


77 


287 


411 


477 


182 


3,424 



In conclusion I beg to say that in spirit and purpose the Library of 
this Department should be a professional Library — a Library for Schools 
and Schoolmasters. Two things follow from this. In the first place the 
teacher and the School officer should have ready access to the shelves of the 
Library; this condition is already fulfilled. The shelves are open to any 
educationist in the Province. In the second place the shelves should meet 
the needs of the Educationists of the Province, and should reflect the best 
modern thought on all phases of school life and activity. As it is next to 
impossible for any one person to be familiar with everything that is written 
on pedagogics, I would suggest that a proposition be made to the Ontario 
Educational Association at their next annual meeting to nominate a Library 
Committee whose duty it shall be to submit each year a list of works on 
Education and of such text-books as in their opinion should have a place in 
the Library, leaving the acceptance or rejection of the books to the decision 
of the Librarian, subject to the final action of the Minister. 



324 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The following is a list of the books purchased during the past year : 

Pedagogy. 

The Human Nature Club, an introduction to the Study of Mental Life. 

Notes on Child Study, by Edward Lee Thorndike. 

How to Tell Stories to Children, by Sara Cone Bryant. 

Great Pedagogical Essays, Plato to Spencer, by F. V. N. Painter. 

The Teacher's Critic, and Mistakes in Teaching, by Jas. L. Hughes. 

How to Secure and Retain Attention, by Jas. L. Hughes. 

The Power of Play in Child Culture, by G. Hamilton Archibald. 

Courses of Studies in the Eight Grades, by Charles A. McMurray, vols. 1 and 2. 

Special Method in Elementary Science for the Common School, by Charles A. McMurray. 

A Text-Book in the History of Education, by. Paul Monroe. 

The Philosophy of Education, by Herman Harrell Home. 

The German Universities and University Study, by Friedrich Paulsen, translated by 

F. Thilly and W. W. Elwang. 
Elements of Psychology, by Edward L. Thorndike. 
Psychology, by James R. Angell. 
Physical Education, by A. MacLaren. 
The Launching of a University, by D. C. Gilman. 
Principles of Teaching, by Edward L. Thorndike. 
A History of Higher Education in America, by Charles F. Thwing. 
Among Country Schools, by O. J. Kern. 
Citizenship and the Schools, by Jeremiah W. Jenks. 

Science, Political Economy, Anthropology, etc. 

Auditing: A Practical Manual for Auditors, by Lawrence R. Dicksee. 

Accounting, in Theory and Practice, by George Lisle. 

'The Theory of Finance, by George King. 

Elements of Political Economy, by James Bonar. 

The History of Commerce in Europe, by H. de B. Gibbons. 

Western Civilization, by Benjamin Kidd. 

Success Among Nations, by Emil Reich. 

The Microscope, an introduction to Microscopic Methods and to Histology, by Simon 

Henry Gage. 
Volcanoes, their Structure and Significance, by T. G. Bonney. 
The Stars, A Study of the Universe, by Simon Newcombe. 

Principles of Sanitary Science and the Public Health, by Wm. T. Sedgwick. 
The Euahlayi Tribe, a Study of Aboriginal Life in Australia, by K. Langloh Parker. 
Origin of the Anglo-Saxon Race, by Thomas William Shore. 
First Empire Number of the Engineering Review, London, Eng., July, 1906. 

Science, Political Economy, Anthropology, Etc. 

The Origin of Species, by Means of Natural Selection, etc., by Charles Darwin. 
Canadian Nationality, The Cry of Labor and other Essays, by W. Frank Hathaway. 

Philosophy, Ethics and Religion. 

The Two Babylons, by Rev. Alexander Hislop. 

Plain Talks on Health and Morals, by C. C. Casselman and Rev. W. W. Walker. 

Bible Stories, Old Testament. 

Bible Stories, New Testament, by Richard G. Moulton. 

Ethical Addressee, Lectures given before the American Ethical Societies. 12 vols. 

Industrial and Domestic Science. 

The Care of the Child in Health, by Nathan Oppenheim. 
Nelson's New Drawing Teacher's Handbook, by J. Vaughan. 
A Manual of Clay Modelling, by Mary L. H. Unwin. 
Geometrical Drawing and Design, by J. Humphrey Spanton. 
The Art of Shading, by William Mann. 

Light, Shade and Shadow, from Model Casts with introductory Model Drawing, by 
John Skeaping. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 325 



The Art Crafts for Beginners, by Frank G. Sanford. 

Industrial Work for Public Schools, by Martha A. Holton and Alice F. Rollins. 

Elementary Brush-Work Studies by Elizabeth Corbet Yeats. 

Food and the Principles of Dietetics, by Robert Hutchinson. 

'Diet in Sickness and in Health, by Mrs. Ernest Hart. 

Home Economics, by Maria Parloa. 

Home Nursing, by Eveleen Harrison. 

How to Feed Children, by Louise E. Hogan. 

The Story of the Living Machine, by H. W. Conn. 

The Hostess of To-Day, by Linda Hull Lamed. 

Practical Cooking and Serving, by Janet Mackenzie Hill. 

Diets for Infants and Children in Health and Disease, by Louis Starr. 

The Care of Children, by Elizabeth Robinson Scovil. 

A Hand-Book of Invalid Cooking, by Mary A. Boland. 

Elements of the Theory and Practice of Cookery, by Mary E. Williams and Catharine 

Rolston Fisher. 
The Cost of Living as Modified by Sanitary Science, by Ellen H. Richards. 
The Duties of Women, a course of Lectures by Frances Power Cobbe. 
The Care and Feeding of Children, by L. Emmett Holt. 

The Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning, by Ellen H. Richards and S. Maria Elliott. 
Surgical Emergencies, by Paul Swain. 
The Laws of Health, by David Nabarro. 
Problems in Furniture Making, by Fred. D. Crawshaw. 
Plaster Casts and How they are Made, by Frank Forrest Frederick. 

POETRT . 

The Collected Poems of Isabella Valancy Crawford, by J. W. Garwin. 

The Collected Poems of Wilfred Campbell. 

The Poetical Works of Francis Ridley Havergal. 

Lord Tennyson's Poetical Works, with notes, 10 vols. 

In Memoriam, annotated by the Author. 

Select Poems, Coleridge and Wordsworth, edited by W. J. Alexander, 1906. 

The Golden Treasury of Songs and Lyrics, by Francis T. Palgrave. 

Fiction and Practical Life. 

The Evolution of Dodd, by William Hawley Smith. 
The Complete Works of Louisa Muhlbach, 20 vols. 
,The Works of Sir Gilbert Parker, 14 vols. 
The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson, 30 vols. 
The Works of George Macdonald, 32 vols. 
F. Marion Crawford's Works, 35 vols. 
L. N. Tolstoi's complete Works, 24 vols. 
A. J. Church's Works, 32 vols. 

Stepping Stones to Manhood, by William B. Pearce. 
Ivan the Terrible, by K. Waliszewski. 
Where the Sugar Maple Grows, by Adeline M. Teskey. 
Leaves from Rosedale, by Charles Beaumont Jarvis. 
Donalda, a Scottish Canadian Story, by Elizabeth S. McLeod. 
Nancy Stair, by Elinor Macartney Lane. 

Wacousta, a Tale of the Pontiac Conspiracy, by Major Richardson. 
A Canadian Girl in South Africa, by E. Maud Graham. 

Literature. 

Tennyson, His Art and Relation to Modern Life, by Stopford A. Brooke. 
Essays, by George Brimley and Wm. George Clark. 

How to Read English Literature, Chaucer to Milton, by Laurie Magnus. 
THS Works of William Shakespeare, edited by William Craig. 
Modern English Literature, by Edmund Gosse. 
A Browning Primer, by Esther Phoebe Defries. 

Wordsworth's Literary Criticism, edited with an introduction by Nowell C. Smith. 
Literature, its Principles and Problems, by Theodore Hunt. 

Epochs of English Literature, by J. C. Stobart : Vol, 1, The Chaucer Epoch; Vol. 2, 
The Spenser Epoch; Vol. 3, The Shakespeare Epoch, 3 vols. 



326 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Text Books. 

Canadian Standard Book-Keeping, by Westervelt, Brooks, et at. 

New Public School Geography. 

Pitman's Shorthand Instructor, a complete exposition of Sir Isaac Pitman's System. 

The Canadian Accountant, by S. G. Beatty and J. W. Johnson. 

An Elementary Course in Practical Zoology. 

Teacher's Handbook, Tonic Sol-Fa System of Music, by A. T. Cringan, 2 copies. 

Type Lessons for Primary Teachers in the Study of Nature, Literature and Art, by 

Anna E. McGovern. 
Occupations for Little Fingers, a Manual for Grade Teachers, etc., by E. Sage and 

A. M. Cooley. 
Principles of General Grammar, by J. Roemer. 
Modern Gymnastic Exercises, by A. Alexander. 
Healthful Exercises for Girls, by A. Alexander. 
Drill for the Standards, by A. Alexander. 

An Introduction to Practical Geography, by Simmons and Richardson. 
Gage & Company's New Canadian Geography, 2 copies. 
Mother Stories, by Maud Lindsay. 

History of the British Empire, by W. F. Collier, Advanced Class Book. 
History of the British Empire, by W. F. Collier, School Series. 
A German Grammar for High Schools and Colleges, by George Theodore Dippold. 
Easy Mathematics, Chiefly Arithmetic, by Sir Oliver Lodge. 

Laboratory and Field Exercises in Physical Geography, by Gilbert H. Trafton. 
School Hvgiene, the Laws of Health in Relation to School Life, by Arthur Newsholme 

and Walter C. C. Pakes. 
Conversations on Chemistry, by W. Ostwold and Elizabeth Catharine Ramsay. 
A Historical Geography of the British Empire, by Hereford B. George. 
Carpenter's Geographical Readers, viz.: — South America, Asia, Africa, North America 

and Australia, by Frank G. Carpenter, 5 vols. 
Thirty-five Ontario Public and High School Text Books. 
Taylor's Elementary Arithmetic. 

Hamblin Smith's 20th Century Arithmetic, by W. Scott, 2 copies. 
Longman's English Historical Series for Schools, by T. F. Tout. Books 1. 2 and 3. 
Elementary Algebra for the Higher Grades and Secondary Schools, by P. Ross. 

Miscellaneous — Histoey, Biography, Reference Books. 

Recollections of the American War, 1812-14, by Dr. Dunlop. 

The Encyclopedia Americana, by F. C. Beach and G. E. Rines, illustrated. 16 vols. 

Digest of Canadian Mercantile Laws, by W. H. Anger. 

Ontario Assignments Act, with notes by R. S. Cassells. 

Proceedings of the National Educational Association for 1905, also Year Book 190.5-6. 

Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage, 1905. 

Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland, 1904. 

Burke's Landed Gentry of Great Britain, 1900. 

Canadian Almanac for 1906. 

Who's Who, 1906, by A. and C. Black, London, Eng. 

Makers of Canada, John Graves Simcoe, bv Duncan C. Scott. 

Shifting Scenes, or Memories of Many Men in Many Lands, by Sir Edward Malet. 

New France and New England, by John Fiske. 

Russia, by Sir Donald Mackenzie Wallace. 

Studies of a Biographer, by Leslie Stephen, 4 vols. 

All the Russias, Travels, Studies, etc., by Henry Norman. 

Women and Men of the French Renaissance, by Edith Sichel. 

Murray's New Oxford Dictionary, parts of vols. 6, 7 and 8. 

The Concise Imperial Dictionary, by Charles Annandale. 

John Boyle O'Reilly, His Life, Poems and Speeches, by James Jeffrey Roche, 2 vols. 

Ballads, Critical Reviews, Tales, etc., by William Makepeace Thackeray, with Life of 

the Author, by Leslie Stephen. 
The Life of Lord Russell of Killorven, by R. Barry O'Brien. 
The Land of the Pigmies, by Captain Guy Burrows, with introduction by H. M. 

Stanley. 
The English Dialect Dictionary, edited by Joseph Wright, 6 vols. 
Ore Deposits of the United States and Canada, by James F. Kemp. 
A Greek-English Lexicon, by Henry George Liddell and Robert Scott. 
Whittaker's Almanac for 1906. 
The Story of the Canadian People, Ontario Edition, by David M. Duncan. 2 copies 






11)06 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 327 



The Saint Lawrence, its Basin and Border Lands, by Samuel Edward Dawson. 

Review of Historical Publications Relating to Canada, by G. M. Wrong and H. H. 
Langton. Vol. 10, 1905. 

Records of the Past, by Rev. Henry Mason Baum and Frederick Bennet Wright, 4 vols. 

Report on Secondary Education in Birkenhead, by Michael E. Sadler. 

Le Morte D' Arthur, Sir Thomas Mallory's Book of King Arthur and of His Noble 
Knights of the Round Table. Vols. I. and II. 

Year Book, Council of Supervisors of the Manual Arts, 1901, 1903, 1904, 1905, 4 vols. 

The Siege of the South Pole, by Hugh Robert Mill. 

Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, by L. A. F. de Bourrienne, 4 vols. 

The Development of the Sunday School, 1780-1905. Official Report of the 11th Inter- 
national Sunday School Convention, Toronto, Canada, 1905. 

Report on Secondary Education in Liverpool, including the Training of Teachers for 
Public Elementary Schools, by Michael E. Sadler. 

Rise of the Loyalists, a Sketch of American History, by the Viscount de Fronsac. 

Pailiament, Past and Present, a Popular and Picturesque Account of a Thousand Years 
in the Palace of Westminster, by Arnold Wright and Philip Smith. 

Torontoneneis for 1906. 

The Far East, by Archibald Little. 

Trie Story of the County of Dundas from 1784 to 1904, by J. Smyth Carter. 

The Canadian Annual Review of Public Affairs for 1905, by J. Castell Hopkins. 

Memoirs of a Great Detective, Memoirs in the Life of J. Wilson Murray, by Victor 
Speer. 

Memoirs of the Northern Kingdom, written A. D. 1872, by Rev. Wm. Jahnsenykes. 

Anthropophagy, by Charles W. Darling. 

Interesting Correspondence between His Excellency Governor Sullivan and Colonel 
Pickering, in which the latter vindicates himself. 

An Examination of the Conduct of Great Britain respecting Neutrals since the year 
1791. 

Further and Still More Suppressed Documents regarding the Decrees of France respect- 
ing Commerce. 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Education at Washington, U. S., 1904. 2 vols. 

Record of the 9th Jubilee of the University of Glasgow, 1451-1901. 

The Book of Jubilee, In Commemoration of the 9th Jubilee of the University of Glas- 
gow, 1451-1901, by Earl Rosebery. 

Stonehenge and Other British Stone Monuments, astronomically considered by Sir 
Norman Lockyer. 

Documentary History of Education, Upper Canada, by Dr. J. George Hodgins, vols. 
14 and 15. 

The Life of Froude, by Herbert Paul. 

Cyclopedia of American Horticulture, by L. H. Bailey, 4 vols. 

Cyclopedia of Methodism in Canada, by Rev. George H. Cornish, 2 vols. 

The Statesman's Year 'Book, 1906. 

The History of Methodism, by John Fletcher Hurst, 7 vols. 

Thomas Carlyle, a History of the First Forty Years of His Life, 1795-1835. by James 
Anthony Froude. Vols. I. and II. 

Reference Catalogue of Current Literature, by J. Whittaker & Sons. Vols. I. and II. 
A to Z 3 1906. 

The United States Catalogue of Books published 1902-1905, by Marion E. Potter. 

Life and Letters of Lord Durham, by' Stuart Reid. 

Latin-English Dictionary, by Sir William Smith. 

Hunter's Panoramic Guide from Niagara Falls to Quebec, by Wm. S. Hunter, Jr. 

Dictionary of Quotations from Ancient and Modern English and Foreign Sources, by 
Rev. James Wood. 

Natural History and Nature Study. 

Butterflies and Moths of the Country Side, by F. Edward Hulme. 

The Tree Book, a Popular Guide to the Trees of North America, by Julia Ellen Rogers. 

Stories from Natural History, by Richard Wagner. 

The Living Plant in Leaf, Flower and Fruit, by Alfred Ernest Wright and Edmund 

Step. 
Experiments with Plants, by W. J. V. Osterhout. 
Birds and Bees, Essays by John Burroughs, 2 copies. 
Journal of Researches into the Natural History and Geology of the Countries visited 

by H. M. S. Bogle, on Her Voyage Round the World, by Charles Darwin. 
Peeps into Nature's Ways, Chapters on Insect, Plant and Minute Life, by John J. Ward. 
The Uses and Wonders of Plant Hairs, by Kate E. Styan. 



328 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Nature Through the Microscope and Camera, by Richard Kerr. 

The Story of Germ Life, by W. H. Conn. 

Manual of Mineralogy and Petrography, by James D. Dana. 

Coral and Coral Islands, by James D. Dana. 

Mountain Wild Flowers of Canada, by Julia W. Henshaw. 

The Teaching Botanist, by Wm. Ganong. 

First Studies in Plant Life, by George Francis Atkinson. 

Nature Study and Life, by Clifton F. Hodge. 

Lessons with Plants, by L. H. Bailey. • 

Sea-Shore Life, by Alfred Gainsborough Mayer. 

The Sea-Beach at Ebb-Tide, by Augusta Foote Arnold. 

Tenants of an Old Farm, by Henry Christopher McCbok. 

The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication, by Charles Darwin. Vols. 

I. and II. 
The Common Spiders of the United States, by James H. Emerton. 
Seed Dispersal, by W. J. Beal. 

First Principles of Agriculture, by Emmett S. Goff and D. D. Mayne, 2 copies. 
Studies of Plant Life in Canada, by Catharine Parr Traill. 
The Great World's Farm, by Selina Gage. 

Art. 

How to Look at Pictures, by Robert Clermont Witt. 
Art-Life of William Morris Hunt, by Helen M. Knowlton. 

Cyclopedia of Architecture in Italy, Greece and the Levant, by William P. P. Long- 
fellow. 
British Contemporary Artists, by Cosmo Monkhouse. 
How to Study Pictures, by Charles H. Caffin. 

A History of Architectural Development, by T. M. Simpson, Vol. 1. 
The School Arts Book, by Henry T. Bailey, 5 vols. 

The Amateur Artist, or Oil and Water Color Painting, by F. Delamotte. 
A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, by B. and B. F. Fletcher. 
Masters in Art, a Series of Illustrated Monographs, 6 vols. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

HENRY R. ALLEY, 

Toronto, December, 1906. Librarian. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



329 




330 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



APPENDIX J.— THIRTY -FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
ONTARIO INSTITUTION FOR THE EDUCATION OF THE 
BLIND, BRANTFORD. 

Being for the Year Ended 30th September, 1906. 

Hon. II. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., Minister of Education: 

Sir,— I have the honor to transmit herewith the Thirty-fifth Annual 
lleport upon the Institution for the Education and Instruction of the Blind, 
Brantford, for the year ended 30th September, 1906. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

H. F. Gardiner, 

Principal. 
Brantford, October, 1906. 



THE INSTITUTION FOE THE EDUCATION OF THE BLIND. 

In presenting' the thirty-fifth annual report of the Ontario Institution 
for the Education of the Blind, I have to record with gratitude that, during 
the scholastic year 1905-06, the teachers, officers and pupils were singu- 
larly free from serious illness, and the results of their joint labors were, 
therefore, eminently satisfactory. The reports of the literary and musical 
examiners, Messrs. Passmore and Fairclough respectively, which are ap- 
pended to this report, indicate the character and extent of the work done 
in those departments, while the newspaper reports of the Several enter- 
tainments given by, and to, the pupils, which are copied elsewhere, show 
something of the relations between the population of the Institution and 
the population of the city in which the Institution is located. The old 
tradition of "town and gown" is one of hostility, and there is a natural ten- 
dency for a body of students living within the walls of the same building 
to make a little world of their own, in which ignorance of the ways and 
ideas of the great world outside is a prominent feature. The tendency to 
isolation is more pronounced as between blind and sighted people than as 
between two sets of sighted people, yet I am happy to be able to say that 
the good people of Brantford have promptly and cordially responded to my 
every suggestion that the blind boys and girls would love them more if they 
knew them better. Church choirs and young people's societies have favored 
us with evening visits, and some families have been generous with their 
invitations to pupils to come to their homes. All these things help to 
break down the barrier of reserve, to remove awkwardness and prejudice, 
and to make the blind feel more at ease in the presence of those who can see. 

The conduct of the pupils throughout the session has been, with hardly 
an exception, exemplary, and there was a decided improvement in the phy- 
sical condition of the boys, due in great part to the persistence of the Super- 
visor in keeping them out of doors and on the move. The blind have a 
lower average of vitality than the seeing, and it is of the first importance 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 331 



to give them the "maximum of health," without which they can neither 
study nor work to advantage. The paragraph on "Athletics" will show in 
greater detail what has been attempted and accomplished in this direction. 

No expenditure of labor, or of money, will make a blind person as 
capable as that same person would be with sight, yet this fact, which one 
would expect to be obvious, is overlooked by many, who are disappointed 
that every youth who has attended a school for the blind is not self-sup- 
porting, and on the road to a competence. There are, in proportion to num- 
bers, as many grades of intellect and of ability among the blind as among 
the seeing; the blind man who is moderately successful in business would 
probably be a "captain of industry' ' if he could see. What the sighted 
man, who can barely make a living, would do or be if he were blind, may 
be left to the imagination of the reader. I have taken some trouble to col- 
lect and arrange the evidence of experts on the problem of the blind, be- 
lieving that the first step toward its solution is to enable the public to under- 
stand it. 

The seeing boy does not leave school with a trade at his fingers' ends 
and the ability to earn a living; as a rule the beginning of his apprentice- 
ship at a trade follows the end of his school life. The blind boy cannot take 
the same enjoyment out of sports and games as his sighted fellow, yet there 
are times after school hours when outdoor exercise is better for the blind 
boy than instruction in the workshop. 

Applications for the admission of adults, who have lost their sight, 
as pupils in this Institution, continue to arrive, most of the applicants de- 
claring a preference for a course in piano-tuning. Xot many grown men 
are capable of becoming good piano tuners, and if that were otherwise, the 
finding of situations for any large number of tuners is difficult, if not im- 
possible. The objections) to having adults and children in the same school 
are stated elsewhere. Yet it would seem as if the case of the adult blind 
demands immediate attention. The proportion of blind adults to blind 
children of school age is as five or six to one. How t , then, can a school for 
the children look after the adults as a side line? 

Inspector Langmuir's reports of thirty years ago show that adults were 
first admitted because there was room to spare, the parents of blind children 
not being willing to allow them to leave home, and it was understood that 
as soon as the room was needed for children the adults would have to go 
out. Not much effort appears to have been made at that time to keep track 
of ex-pupils. Later, the circulating library caused considerable corres- 
pondence, yet the addresses of many ex-pupils were lost, and it is not now 
known whether some of them are dead or alive. I have prepared an alpha- 
betical list of all the pupils who have attended the school since its opening 
in 18T2, with such information about them as was obtainable from old mem- 
bers of the staff and other sources, and with this as a basis I hope to at least 
make an approach to the "Saxon System" which is described in these pages. 
Those who read carefully the statements made before the Royal Commis- 
sion, at the Edinburgh Conference and at the Saginaw Convention, will 
understand that the youthful blind require something more than a course 
of literary, musical and industrial instruction in an institution like this. 
Those who are deprived of sight in adult life need even greater considera- 
tion, and when this is beginning to be admitted in other countries, Ontario 
will not deny the fact nor long neglect her duty. 

The separation of the scholastic from the industrial work for the blind, 
and the separation of blind adults from blind children; seem to be do- 



332 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



sirable, yet so long as there is only one Institution for the Blind in Ontario, 
and so long as even a few adults are enrolled among the pupils, industrial 
training cannot be wholly abandoned. The list of industries at which a 
blind man of average capacity can earn even a modest living is very brief. 
The occupations at which he can earn his board are not numerous. Yet it 
is much better for a blind man to be employed than for him to be idle, leav- 
ing the question of wages out of consideration. In England and in some 
of the States of America the adult blind are employed in workshops, run 
at an admitted loss, where the buying and the selling are done by people 
who can see, and where the wages actually earned are supplemented; in 
Germany and Scotland the blind are encouraged and assisted to work and 
do business on their own account. It will be for the Government and Legis- 
lature to determine, after a careful study of what has been done in other 
countries, and of the conditions which prevail in our own, which policy 
shall be pursued in Ontario. I quote the opinions of three leading educators 
of the blind in the United States : 

Wm. B. Wait, for many years Superintendent of the New York City 
Institution for the Blind, writes: — 

"The admission and instruction of adults and children in the same 
school is a subject of much importance. This practice can only be justi- 
fied on the supposition that blindness, in some mysterious way, elimin- 
ates the difference that otherwise exists between adults and children, and 
brings them upon a common plane so that they mingle together, without 
detriment, in the close relationship which exists in a residential school. 
Blindness, however, has no such levelling effect, but, on the contrary, it 
strongly emphasizes the distinctions and incongruities that distinguish 
minors and adults. If adults are to be instructed, moral and social, no 
less than educational, considerations require that the work should be done 
in schools separate from those devoted to children. 

"Closely related to the question last considered is that of industries 
or trades in connection with the school. The vocation of a skilled trade 
belongs to the period of maturity, and it follows that if adults are admitted 
to the school with minors, a strong inducement is at once furnished for the 
establishment of a trade school and manufacturing department, while, on 
the other hand, the existence of such a department opens the way for the 
admission of adults to be trained to work in it. There are as many adult 
females as males who are blind, and together they number approximately 
five times as many as the minor classes. The industrial feature, therefore, 
tends to become dominant, and unavoidably* imparts an element of com- 
mercialism to the school so that money-getting becomes the chief desire 
of the adults, who accordingly prefer shopwork to the mental exercises and 
more strict discipline of the class room. This feeling is shared also by 
the younger pupils, and their interest is diverted from study and is directed 
towards earning money rather than towards mental development and the 
acquisition of knowledge. 

"At the end of their term pupils will not be found to have either the 
means or the general qualifications necessary to begin business in the trade 
at which they have worked and to conduct it successfully against the com- 
petition of sight and machinery with which they must contend. A fairly 
good understanding of the situation will usually be gained by the pupils 
before the close of their school period, and at graduation they are likely 
to feel, not unnaturally, ih<\t they should be furnished with remunerative 
employment. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 333 



"The schools in Boston, Philadelphia and New York City have each 
had a long, trying and costly experience in this matter, due, no doubt, to 
the necessity, as it at first appeared, of following closely and persistently 
the course of their prototypes in Europe. The results in each of the three 
experiments are conclusive and may be summarized as follows: — 

"It was found that the prime and essential work of education was sub- 
ordinated to the conditions created and the demands made by the industries. 

"The morals of the school were greatly impaired. The younger pupils 
were unduly influenced by the adults, whose mental attitudes, dispositions 
and physical habits were often taken up by the younger pupils, making 
them in greater or less degree the echoes and shadows of the older ones. 
Instead of a sense of self-reliance, there was developed a feeling of meri- 
torious and, therefore, deserving dependence, which it was felt to be some- 
body's duty to recognize and provide for. 

"Finally it became necessary to abandon the industrial experiment in 
order to save the institutions for the strictly educational work for which they 
were established. 

"Looking to any lasting good conferred upon the pupils through the 
training in trades, by making them self-reliant and desirous to be self- 
supporting, the experiment was practically void of results. 

"From the foregoing the conclusion is clear that trades or industries 
cannot be properly combined with ordinary educational work in a school 
of this kind. If trades are to be taught and industries are to be carried 
on, they should be taken up after school studies have been completed, and 
in a place far removed from the school proper." 

George C. Morrison, Superintendent of the Maryland School for the 
Blind, writes: — "To sum up, I advocate the establishment and amplifica- 
tion of a workshop and distributing centre for the adult blind, the estab- 
lishment of a department for blind women in some existing charitable home, 
and the establishment of a system of educating the blind in their homes 
similar to the one in force in Massachusetts. But no matter what is done, 
no part of the work for the adult blind should be joined in any way to the 
school work for blind children. There is no connection between the two, 
and only harm to the already established work will result from any effort 
to bring them together." 

0. H. Bur]' , ndent of the New York State Institution for 

the Blind, Bata ites : — "The State cannot, from a purely eco- 

nomic point of \ any later date the establishment of some kind 

of employment i^oticutions for the adult blind. But why not extend the 
work of the schools for the blind to include some provisions for the adult 
blind, their work to be controlled by the same Board of Trustees and super- 
vised and directed by the superintendents of these schools, thus avoiding 
the multiplication of institutions, the duplication of educational machinery, 
and the incurring of additional expense? 

"I answer: There are several serious objections. As stated in the 
earlier part of this paper, the schools for the blind in their earlier days ad- 
mitted blind persons of all ages, but experience has proven this plan to 
be an unwise one. Some of the strongest objections to it are: — 

"First, adults are not easily and cheerfully amenable to the discipline 
which is necessary in the education of children and young people ; and it 
is entirely natural and reasonable that they should not be. 



334 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



"Second, the education of blind children and the management of a 
shop filled with adult laborers are two entirely different problems, either 
one of which is sufficiently difficult of solution to demand all the best thought 
of one superintendent. 

"Third, the presence near a school of anything like a shop is a constant 
menace to the best work in our schools. Boys particularly are too eager 
to drop their studies and enter the shop, the strongest reason, I doubt not, 
being the ardent desire of the boy to be able to earn at as early a date as 
possible his own living and thus be independent. 

"Fourth, for moral reasons adults and children of plastic years should 
not be brought into so close daily association as is necessary when both are 
housed under one roof. 

"Fifth, the dietary of adults and that of growing children and youth 
should differ materially, and in most instances, at least, it is impracticable 
to maintain separate kitchens and dining rooms in the same institution. For 
these and similar reasons it is not practicable to develop these two distinct 
kinds of institutions in the same place and under precisely the same man- 
agement." 

So far as the Ontario institution is concerned, the extension or contrac- 
tion of the industrial work is a question of expediency rather than a question 
of cost. The small boys and small girls take very kindly to bead work; the 
larger girls knit, crochet and sew, and some of them net hammocks; the 
boys cane chairs and net hammocks, cut and peel willow, and there is a 
pretty large class in piano tuning. Basket work has been done in the past, 
and it would be easy to revive it and to add broom making. For the ac- 
commodation of ex-pupils, stocks of willow and cane are kept on hand, and 
there are frequent orders for beads, wire, and other materials. But with a 
school population of juniors there is not much activity in the workshops until 
the middle of the afternoon, and few can become proficient with such lim- 
ited practice. 

I quoted in last year's report the argument of the late Mr. Anagnos, 
of Boston, in favor of the practical abandonment of handicrafts by the 
blind, and the preparation for professional and commercial life by means 
of higher education. This year I cite equally eminent testimony on be- 
half of what accords more closely with my own opinion, namely, that if 
the majority of the blind do not earn their living by handicrafts, they will 
not earn it at all. 

So far, it has not been found practicable to sensibly increase the earn- 
ings of the blind in the face of the intense competition of the sighted ; to 
reduce the cost of living is out of the question; how, then, shall the gap 
between earnings and requirements be bridged without damage to self- 
respect or temptation to idleness and pauperism? These are things for 
sympathizers with the blind to consider, and for this purpose a careful per- 
usal of the following pages is invited. 

Attendance. 

The total registration of pupils in the session of .1905-06 was 123, as 
against 122 in the session of 1904-05 ; at the opening on September 27th, 
1905, there were 107 pupils as compared with 104 at the opening of the 
preceding session; at the close 111, as compared with 107. Of the twelve 
pupils who were present during a part of the session, but did not remain 
until the end, one (male) was homesick and only stayed a few days, two 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT 



335 



(males) were indisposed to work, one (male) was taken home because his 
friends found they could not bear separation from him, two (males) left 
when their parents removed from the Province, two (males) went away to 
obtain employment as piano tuners, one (male) went home to have his eyes 
treated, one (female) went to a specialist for the same purpose near the end 
of the session and did not return, and two (females) went home ill. 

Of the 111 pupils who were present at the end of the session, there 
were 52 males and 59 females. 

The number of pupils in attendance at the opening on September 26th, 
1906, was 110, as compared with 107 at the corresponding date in 1905, and 
111 at the closing of the school term on June 20th, 1906. Of those in at- 
tendance at the end of the last term, 84 had returned, five former pupils, 
who were not here at the close of last term, had come back, and twenty- 
one new pupils had been enrolled. The absence of the twenty-seven who 
had not returned is thus explained: — 



Graduated. 



In piano-tuning 

In music (Artists' Diploma A. T. C. M. 
In industrial work 



Other Causes. 



Recovered sight in one eye 
Domestic requirements .... 

To learn a trade 

Poor health 

Married during vacation . . . 
Removed from Ontario .... 
To study music elsewhere . 
Temporary detention 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


4 





4 





2 . 


2 





1 


1 


1 





1 


2 


2 


4 





1 


1 





2 


2 





1 


1 





2 


2 





2 


2 


2 


5 


7 


9 


18 


27 



Of those classified as temporarily detained, three (females) arrived on 
October 1st, and one new pupil (male) was enrolled on the same day, bring- 
ing the number in attendance up to 114. 

The ages of the new pupils are as follows : — 

Males. ; 

Twenty-five years 1 

Fifteen years 1 I 

Fourteen years 1 j 

Thirteen years ; 1 j 

Twelve years 3 | 

Ten years 1 

Nine years 2 

Seven years 1 

Five vears 1 



12 



Females. 

Twenty-one years i 

Twenty years 2 

Ninteen years 1 

Fifteen years 1 

Thirteen years 2 

Eleven years 1 

Ten years 2 

Eight years 1 

Seven years 1 

Six vears 2 



14 

12 



26 

The total registration in the official year, October 1st, 1905, to Septem- 
ber 30th, 1906, was 147 — 71 males and 76 females — against 141 in the pre- 
ceding official year. 



336 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. IS 



Pupils Registered in Session 1905-06. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Allison, Cameron Vankleek Hill. 

Boudreault. Joseph Ottawa. 

Brimacombe, James Victoria Harbor. 

Burgess, Lloyd Princeton. 

Carnrite, Claude Ameliasburg. 

Chatelain, Jean L'Orignal. 

Clark, James Woodstock. 

Clarke, Walter Toronto. 

Clemmett, Wilbert Omemee. 

Colby, Edward Stratford. 

Cook, Albert Rosseau. 

Crew, William Toronto. 

Daniel, Ovila Dover South. 

Duff, Charles Banda. 

Elnor, Harold Toronto. 

Fall, Albert Toronto. 

Fenton, Mills Allenford. 

Ferguson, John. , Ophir. 

Frayne, Orville Forest. 

Goldie, Roy Sarnia . 

Graham, David Birnam. 

Graham, Glen Birnam. 

Hawken, Howard Whitby. 

Henderson, Richard Ancaster. 

Hughes, John Sudbury. 

Jackson, Alfred Brantford. 

Johnston, Harold Brockville. 

Kelland, Wilber Kirkton. 

Kennedy, Thomas Guelph . 

Lavender, Charles Dundas. 

L'Heureux, Charles Windsor. 

Lott, Albert Brussels. 

Marcotte, Cleophose Mattawa. 

McBride, Charles Toronto. 

McDonald, John Alexandria. 

McDonald, Norman Wingham. 

McKinnon, Neil Hamilton. 

Mealing, Oliver Brantford. 

Nicolson, John Dunn's Valley. 

Porte, Aquila Aylmer. 

Pride, Frank Monkton. 

Purser, John Cobourg. 

Rahmel, Harry Berlin. 

Raymond, Walter Davisville. 

Ritzer, Michael Windsor. 

Sager, Floyd Peterborough . 

Saunders, Bruce Brantford. 

Shillington, Lloyd Blenheim. 

Simpson, Edward Toronto. 

Skinkle, George Warkworth. 

Stokes, George Terra Cotta. 

Thomas, Leslie Branchton. 

Thompson, William Ottawa. 

Thompson, Wm . G Toronto. 

Treneer, Herbert Kingston. 

Valiant, Horace Toronto. 

Watson, Aitken Burford. 

White, Harry Toronto. 

Wisner, William Schomberg. 

Wooley, Roy Springfield. 

Yarocki, Harry Garland, Man. 



Name. 



Residence. 



Amyotte, Malvina Bonfield. 

Baldwin, Vashti Niagara Falls. 

Barr, Janet Ancaster. 

Branston, Ethel Hamilton. 

BuDock, Eva Woodstock. 

Capps, Bertha Toronto. 

Catling, Nellie Cockburn Island. 

Coll, Gertrude Toronto. 

Conybeare, Nettie Innerkip. 

Cuneo, Mary Toronto. 

Curry, Catharine Toronto. 

Davidovdtz, Esther Hamilton. 

Davison, Winifred Griersville. 

Dean, Mabel Stratford. 

Deschenes, Louise Bonfield. 

Elliott, Isabel Elkhorn, Man. 

Ferguson, Enie Toronto. 

Foster. Olive Hamilton. 

Fox, Irene Walkerville. 

Hall, Anna Amherstburg. 

Hepburn, Alice Port Elgin. 

Hepburn, Harriet Port Elgin. 

Houser, Edna . .Toronto. 

James, Gertrude Waterford. 

Johnston, Charlotte Guelph. 

Johnston, Eva Strathburn. 

Kaufman, Blanche Ridgetown. 

Kay, Grace Brantford. 

Kight, Grace Kemptville. 

Lawrie, Caroline Oakdale . 

Leonard, Lily Toronto. 

Liggett, Margaret Indian Head, Sask. 

Liggett, Sarah Indian Head, Sask. 

Macdonald, Mary Hamilton. 

Marsh, Mary Holland Landing. 

McCannan, Beatrice Kenora. 

McLeod, Lily Webbwood. 

McNutt, Ella Warsaw. 

McPhater, Jessie Clyde. 

McQuade, Ethel Stratford. 

McRae, Mary Toronto. 

Miles, Mildred Toronto. 

O'Brien, Elizabeth Toronto. 

O'Reilly, Edith Ottawa. 

Patterson, Alma Brantford, 

Ponting, Hester Courtland. 

Prosser, Angelina Toronto. 

Rennie, Lulu Toronto. 

Rooke, Emma Dereham Centre 

Sage, Edna Fanshawe. 

Spicknell, Letitia London Junction. 

Sprengel, Marie Harrow. "- 

Squair, Ethel Williamstown. 

Stevens, Ethel .Peterborough. 

Stickley, Alice Toronto. 

Swetman, Maud Tillsonburg. 

Thompson, Gladys Toronto. 

Thompson, Teresa Hamilton. 

Thomson, Anna V Ottawa. 

Wilcox, Catharine Toronto. 

Wolsey, Esta Toronto. 

Wooldridge, Eleanor Palmerston. 



1906 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



337 



New Pupils at Opening of Session, 1906-07. 



Name. Residence. 

John Cartwright Toronto. 

William Crew ( re-admitted )Toronto. 

John Cundy Areola, Sask. 

Byron Derbyshire Athens. 

Ludger Gagne Bonfield . 

Gustav Golz Beausejour, Man. 

Walter Harvey Toronto. 

Thomas Higgins Toronto. 

Leslie Ross French, Sask. 

Leonard Sherman Fernie, B.C. 

Francis Vance loronto. 

Lionel West Gait. 

Clifford Patterson (Oct. lst)Dundas. 



Name. Residence. 

Gladys Bickerton Navan. 

Margueret Doherty Peterborough. 

Margaret Donaldson 

(re-admitted) Lanark. 

Eva Duciaume Rockland. 

Doris Hawley Winnipeg, Man. 

Gertrude Heimrich Berlin . 

Helen McPherson Arkona. 

Eva Muntz Vegreville. Alberta 

Pearl Nevin (re-admitted). .Trent Bridge. 

Ruby Reamsbottom Haileybury. 

Kathryn Sells Mitchell. 

Laura Smith (re-admitted) Dorchester. 

Muriel Stephenson Collingwood. 

Ethel Stevens ( re-admitted Peterborough. 



Publicity. 

Early in the summer vacation I sent the following letter to five hundred 
Ontario newspapers, and I have to thank a very large proportion of the 
editors of those papers for inserting it, thus helping me materially in the 
difficult task of locating the blind children of the Province: — 

THE SCHOOL FOE THE BLIND AT BRANTFORD. 

To the Editor of The 



Dear Sir, — I ask your assistance to enable me to get into communi- 
cation with the parents or guardians of all the blind children in Ontario, 
under the age of twenty-one years. The Institution for the Education and 
Instruction of the Blind, maintained by the Ontario Legislature, admits 
as pupils "all blind youths, of both sexes, between the ages of seven and 
twenty-one, not being deficient in intellect, and free from disease or physi- 
cal infirmity, being residents of the Province of Ontario." It is not neces- 
sary that the applicant shall be totally blind; the test is inability to "read 
ordinary type and attend a school for the seeing without serious injury to 
the sight." The initial difficulty is to locate the children who are eligible 
for admission, and it will be helpful in the future if your readers will send 
me the names and addresses of blind children under seven, as well as of 
those between seven and twenty-one. 

Should you favor me by the publication of this letter. I would ask 
your readers not to depend upon the parents of the children with defective 
sight to attend to this matter. If all could witness the gain in health, hap- 
piness, knowledge and self-reliance that comes to those who, deprived by 
their affliction of access to the public schools, take advantage of the edu- 
cational facilities afforded by this institution, none would grudge the time 
and trouble required to widen the scope of the school's influence. Send 
me the names and addresses, and I will by correspondence or visitation do 
the rest. 

H. F. Gardiner, 



Brantford, July 20th, 1906. 

22 ED. 



Principal O. I. B. 



338 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Now that the Annual Report of this Institution is appended to the An- 
nual Report of the Minister of Education, the work done here will become 
better known to the hundreds of teachers of the High Schools and Public 
Schools who receive the Minister's Report, and children whose sight is so 
defective as to place them at a serious disadvantage in the ordinary school 
will be advised by the teachers to apply for admission to this Institution. 
Teachers are invited to visit the Institution when convenient and to write 
whenever they desire any • information concerning the Institution and its 
work. 

Writing. 

The typewriter is still used by some of the pupils for their correspond- 
ence, but they are strongly advised to cultivate pencil writing with the 
grooved card as the system which will be of most practical use to them 
after leaving school. For their school work (taking notes, writing music, 
etc.) and for correspondence with one another, the blind make great use 
of the point print, which they can both read and write, and in which many 
of the newest books are printed. The letters are easily learned, and the 
dots are better adapted for finger reading than embossed letters are. 

NEW YORK POINT ALPHABET. 





Capitals : 


— A • • . . 


B : 




c • 


• D 




E 




F ■ 


• • . G .. : • H . : 


: • I : • 


J- 


• . K- : 


• L : . •• 


M : 




N.. 


• • 




P 




Q: 


.. • R. : • • S ' . 


. . T . 


u . 


.. • v- . 


• . W . . • . 


X 




Y . 


• • Z 
















a • • b : 


• • c • • . 


d • 


: e " 


f • • 


" g- • 


h . 




i : 


J - : 


• kv • : 1 : . m : 


' n . . o 


p • 


q: 


. . r . : 


s ' 


. t . 


u . 


v * . 


w . 




x : . 


= y • 


• . z * : : Number 


sign : 


Numerals 1 : 


: 2 •• 3 . : 


4 


• 5 


• : 6 


: . 7 . • 


8 • . 


9 : 


o- 


Word and part word signs the . 


and 


L • : . of 


• : that 




ing 




ch :•• 


ou 




sh 




th : : wh : . • ph 


: . gh: 




Punctuation Marks 


: — Comma * 


Semi-colon 




Colon : . 


Interrogation ■ : 


Dash . 


Period : : Exclamation 




Parenthesis : * 


Quotation : 


.. 1 


Apostrophe : ■ ■ : H 


yphen : ■ 



Domestic Science. 

During the winter months a class in Domestic Science is taught by 
Miss Lee, but the necessities of space limit the number in this class to six. 
Miss Lee reports : — 

Mr. H. F. Gardiner, Principal 0.1. B. : 

Sir, — During the past year much interest has been taken by the pupils 
of the Domestic Science class. Though they are younger on the whole than 
in former years, very fine work was accomplished, when one considers that 
the three youngest (two of them quite blind) had for the first time swept a I 
floor, peeled a potato, or done any scrubbing, to say nothing of the numer- 
ous other important things connected with housekeeping. 

One can naturally understand how a blind child is set aside in the 
home regarding the work of the house. It is the exception, and not the 
rule, when a blind girl is given an opportunity to help in any kind of house- 
work in the home. They are usually made to feel that they are more of a 
hindrance than a help, when, if parents would stop to think that, in al- 
lowing their child to help, if it is ever so little each day, even though it 
does retard the work some, it would be such a benefit, for it is by constant | 
practice that one acquires any knowledge worth having. 

22a ED. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 339 






The class in Domestic Science here helps a young girl to feel that she 
is not altogether useless, and it would be such a help to the teacher if the 
children were taught at home how, at least, to hold a broom. Let them 
sweep the sidewalk or the back yard, if it is thought they would be in the 
way in the house. Then give them the steps or porch to scrub, if nothing 
else, for the exercise alone is very beneficial to a blind child. 

The very youngest children are taught here to make their beds and keep 
their rooms neat and orderly, so that when the girls enter the Domestic 
Science class they do not find it so hard to learn to keep the kitchen in 
perfect order. They learn the proper method of dish-washing, how to take 
care of a sink, how to keep a stove clean, and to have a place for every- 
thing and everything in its place, that is, the kitchen must be as clean and 
orderly when a class leaves it as when it was entered. 

During the year the pupils were given lessons in the theory of food 
economy, nutrition, etc., snowing which are the most healthful and, there- 
fore, the cheapest foods to use; also, on the quantity of food required ac- 
cording to climate, seasons, clothing, age, sex, etc. 

They were also given lessons in the theory of cookery, showing the 
different methods used and the reason for each, such as how to put the in- 
gredients for a cake together properly, how to weigh and measure, how to 
stir, beat and cut, fold or lift. 

In their theory they were also given time-tables in cooking, such as 
the length of time it should take to boil vegetables, coffee, meats, fish, etc. 
In the broiling of meats, etc., and the baking of bread, cakes, pastry, pud- 
dings, meats and fowls, they were similarly instructed. 

Afterwards they were given an opportunity to put their theory into 
practice, when they were taught how to make dishes for the different meals 
in a day, besides learning how to economize by turning the left-overs of 
meals into a tasty dish. 

Among the things they cooked this year were foaming omelets, poached 
eggs on toast, vegetables, soups, pastry, puddings, biscuits, cookies, cakes, 
scalloped dishes and croquettes. 

On theory days the recipes for these different dishes, as well as numer- 
ous other recipes are taken down in point print, to be stored up for future 
use. 

In this way the pupils have an opportunity of accumulating enough 
valuable information to make a good-sized cook-book. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

E. Lee. 

I may add that the "cooking class" is popular among the girls, and 
I have had to refuse applications for admission to it every year. During 
the vacations I receive letters from the pupils' parents expressing their 
satisfaction with the results of their daughters' training in Domestic Science. 
It is a great point gained to have the girls find out how many things they 
can do when they try. 



340 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




Hester Ponting, A.T.C.M., 
Graduated at O. LB., 1906. 




Mary Macdonald, A.T.C.M. 
Graduated at O.T.B., 1906. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 341 



Musical Instruction. 

Sixty-two pupils were instructed in music during the session, most 
of whom were examined by Mr. Fairclough, as described in his report. The 
demand for music lessons always exceeds the appliances for supply. To 
engage another teacher, or to purchase more pianos, is a comparatively 
simple matter, but each piano requires a separate room, and when more 
than a score of rooms are devoted to teaching and practice, there is crowd- 
ing in other departments, especially on the girls' side of the building, which 
is smaller than the boys' side. 

In the extracts from the Reports of Commissions, Conferences and 
Conventions on the Blind, which will be found on other pages, are some 
interesting remarks on the propriety of teaching the blind music. One has 
to consider the pleasure given to the player, the pleasure given to others 
by the player, and the usefulness of musical instruction as a means of earn- 
ing a livelihood. Under the latter head come the divisions of entertain- 
ing, teaching, composing and church-organ work. Mr. Fairclough in his 
report recommends more attention to solo singing, and there are several 
voices in the choral class which are worth cultivation on the lines he indi- 
cates. With the general work of the musical department the examiner ex- 
presses satisfaction, and the records of 0. I. B. pupils at the Toronto Col- 
lege of Music examinations speak for themselves. Two young ladies, Misses 
Mary Macdonald and Hester Ponting, received the degree of Associate 
Toronto College of Music this year, their diplomas being presented at the 
closing concert in June, a report of which will be found under the head of 
Entertainments. Miss Macdonald has been appointed organist of a new 
Catholic Church in Hamilton, and her teachers and friends in the Institu- 
tion have every confidence that she will succeed in that capacity. The Tor- 
onto Globe, of May 24th, 1906, contained the following reference to a per- 
formance in that city by Misses Ponting and Macdonald : — 

"A very interesting graduation recital was given at the Toronto Col- 
lege of Music Tuesday evening by Misses Hester Ponting and Mary Mac- 
donald of the Ontario Institution for the Blind, Brantford, assisted by Miss 
Eveline Ashworth, soprano, and Miss Olive Scholey, contralto, pupils of 
Dr. Torrington. The talent displayed by the young ladies in their piano 
selections was of a very high order, and they showed not only brilliance of 
technique, but a splendid intellectual grasp of the numbers performed. An 
array of pieces, including Beethoven's Appassionata Sonata, two of Schu- 
mann's 'Fantasie Stiicke', Leschetizky's 'Mazurka,' Bach's 'Prelude and 
Fugue in B Flat,' Chopin's 'Ballade in A Flat,' and Batiste's 'Offertoire 
in D Minor' for the organ, served to exhibit a broad musical training and 
versatility of style. Miss Ashworth and Miss Scholey are two vocalists who 
should have a brilliant future, both possessing breadth of tone and facility 
of vocalization. Br. Torrington, in a brief speech, complimented Mr. Ernest 
A. Humphries, musical director of the Institution for the Blind, upon the 
accomplishments of his pupils, and spoke in glowing terms of the Institu- 
tion's noble work." 

The following is a list of successful 0. I. B. pupils in the Toronto 
College of Music examinations, May and June, 1906: — 

Associate Toronto College of Music (A.T.C.M.): 
Hester Ponting. 
Mary Macdonald. 

Third Year Piano: 

Mary Macdonald (honors). 



842 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Second Year Piano : 

Alice Stickley (first-class honors). 
Thomas Kennedy (honors). 
Grace Kay. 
Gertrude Coll. 

First Year Piano : 

Eleanor Wooldridge (first-class honors), 
Edward Simpson (first-class honors). 
Horace Yaliant (first-class honors). 
Beatrice McCannan (first-class honors). 
Margaret Liggett (honors). 
Charles Lavender (honors). 
Enie Ferguson (honors). 

Second Year Counterpoint : 

Grace Kay (first-class honors). 
Mary Macdonald (first-class honors). 
Grace Kight (first-class honors). 
Herbert Treneer (first-class honors). 

Second Year Written Harmony : 
Grace Kay (first-class honors). 
Grace Kight (honors). 
Mary Macdonald. 
Herbert Treneer. 

First Year Written Harmony : 

Victoria Thomson (first-class honors). 
Alice Stickley (first-class honors). 
Thomas Kennedy (first-class honors). 
Gertrude Coll (first-class honors). 
Eva Bullock. 

Second Year Practical Harmony : 
Grace Kight (first-class honors). 
Mary Macdonald (first-class honors). 
Herbert Treneer (first-class honors). 
Grace Kay. 

First Year Practical Harmony : 

Alice Stickley (first-class honors). 
Victoria Thomson (first-class honors). 
Thomas Kennedy (honors). 
Eva Bullock. 
Gertrude Coll. 

Second Year History of Music : 

Mary Macdonald (first-class honors). 
Grace Kay (first-class honors). 
Grace Kight (first-class honors). 
Herbert Treneer. 

First Year History of Music : 

Victoria Thomson (first-class honors). 
Alice Stickley (first-class honors). 
Gertrude Coll (first-class honors). 
Eva Bullock (honors). 
Thomas Kennedy. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 343 



Entertainments .- 

The entertainments during the session, for and by the pupils, were of 
a varied character. The city papers reported that "the pupils of the In- 
stitution for the Blind had an enjoyable time on the evening of October 
31st (Hollowe'en), many of them taking part in an impromptu concert pro- 
gramme and the rest constituting the audience. The chair was occupied 
by Mr. P. Eoney, one of the literary teachers, who performed the functions 
of his office with efficiency, while the performers, little and big, earned and 
received hearty applause. Among the specialties was a French song by 
Jean Chatelain, of L'Orignal, and a Musical Romance by Herbert Treneer 
and Charles Duff, the former of whom read a series of questions from a 
point-print sheet, which the latter answered on the piano, to the intense 
delight of the audience. The chorus bj^ the Kindergarten class, and little 
Teresa Thompson's solos were received with much favor. At an intermis- 
sion in the programme, candy and raisins were passed around by the matron 
and assistants." 

On the afternoon of December 16th, the junior girls gave a concert in 
the Yocal Room, wilh Isabel Elliott in the chair, and they got through 
the following programme very nicely: — 

1. Chorus — "Welcome." 

2. Chairman's Address — Subject, "Christmas." 

3. Recitation — Mildred Miles — "Bruce and the Spider." 

4. Quintette — Blanche Kaufman, Vashti Baldwin, Marie Sprengel, Mary Cuneo. 

Ethel Squair — "Over Fields and Meadows." 

5. Dialogue — Mildred Miles, Ethel Squair, Mary Marsh. Ethel Stevens — "Three 

Sisters and Santa Claus." 

6. Recitation — Ethel Squair — "The Disobedient Mouse." 

7. Song — Emma Rooke — ''Two Little Boys." 

8. Dialogue — Nine Girls — "Christmas Spirits." 

9. Piano Solo — Beatrice McCannan. 

10. Chorus— "The Dolls." 

11. Recitation— Mary Cuneo— "The Six Turkeys." 

12. Song— Isabel Elliott— "The Old House by the Linden." 

13. Piano Solo — Beatrice McCannan. 






Christmas Concert. 

The Christmas Concert was held on the evening of December 21st, the 
newspaper reporting that "in spite of the inclement weather, the Music Hall 
at the Institution for the Blind was well filled, and as usual the entertain- 
ment provided was good and was highly appreciated. Promptly at eight 
o'clock Principal Gardiner called the audience to order, remarking that he 
accepted it as a compliment to himself, the teachers and the pupils that so 
many ladies and gentlemen had left their comfortable homes and braved 
the storm to attend the concert. The session so far had been a happy one, 
much good and useful work having been done, notwithstanding the handi- 
cap of illness among the teachers, which necessitated harder work on the 
part of those whose health had not been affected. He felt like compliment- 
ing the pupils on their industry and good conduct, and he would be abun- 
dantly satisfied if the same standard were maintained during the remainder 
of the session. . . . * • . 

"The programme consisted of organ and piano solos, two overtures and 
part songs by the Choral Class of some forty voices, interspersed with reci- 
tations. The opening number was the Batiste 'Offertoire in D. Minor' 
played on the organ by Miss Mary Macdonald, who showed that she had 



344 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



splendid command of the instrument, and gave a very pleasing rendering 
of the difficult selection. The recitations were five in number and it was 
remarked that the Institution pupils were never heard to better advantage, 
clearness of enunciation being combined with an absence of over-natural 
expression and inflection, and each reciter was apparently appreciated by 
every listener. The little tots captured all hearts and gave a delightful 
account of themselves, little Miss Blanche Kaufman in 'Her Friend,' and 
Gladys Thompson with 'In Santa Claus' Land.' Miss Esta Wolsey had been 
assigned a difficult task, as her number, 'How the La Rue Stakes Were Lost,' 
required considerable elocutionary power. She succeeded admirably, how- 
ever, and gave evidence of no small talent. Mr. Joseph Boudreault recited 
Drummond's 'The Habitant,' with an accent which comes to him from his 
own mother tongue, and he was certainly the right man in the right place. 
In Kipling's 'Ballad of East and West,' Mr. Thomas Kennedy told a thrill- 
ing soldier-adventure of the India frontier and gave it with splendid power 
and expression. The piano solosists showed that their training had been 
done with careful attention to technical detail and beauty of conception. 
Master Charles Duff is a rather small boy to show so much skill as a pianist, 
but his rendering of Chopin's 'Valse Op. 64, No. 2' and Sinding's 'Marche 
Grotesque' was quite charming and apparently well-nigh flawless. Miss 
Hester Ponting played the 'Witches' Dance,' by McDowell, in quite vir- 
tuoso fashion, and overcame the great technical difficulties with apparent 
ease. 

"The choral class did not disappoint those who always look forward 
to their numbers, and sang three part songs with their well-known atten- 
tion to shading and attack; special mention might be made of the good 
work done by the tenors and basses. The songs were 'The Crusader,' by 
Pinsuti; 'The Elfhorns,' by Bullard, and 'Queen of the Night,' by Gounod. 

"Of the two overtures, the first, 'The Caliph of Bagdad,' by Boieldieu, 
was played on th^ree pianos byi Messrs. Herbert Treneer, Charles Duff, 
Thomas Kennedy, Albert Fall, George Skinkle and Cameron Allison, all of 
whom acquitted themselves splendidly. The second overture was that of 
Handel's 'Occasional Oratorio,' and was rendered on three pianos and the 
pipe organ, the players being Misses Victoria Thompson, Eva Bullock, Grace 
Kight, Eva Johnston, Alice Stickley and Louis Deschenes, with Miss Mary 
Macdonald at the organ. This number formed a splendid climax for a most 
pleasing programme and elicited great applause. 

"It was explained that this concert was simply a Christmas 'entertain- 
ment,' and was not intended to be of the exacting character of the graduat- 
ing exercises and closing, which come in the month of June. Last evening's 
programme was, however, of a most enjoyable nature from all standpoints, 
and was seemingly as great a delight to the performers as to the audience. 

"The National Anthem was sung at a reasonably early hour, after which 
those participating enjoyed light refreshments in the dining room." 

Christmas Tree. 

For the pupils who could not go home for the holidays, on account of 
distance, a Christmas tree was prepared, laden with gifts and decorations, 
and the following programme was presented : — 

1. Piano Solo — Louise Deschenes. 

2. Recitation — Harriet Hepburn. 

3. Song— Isabel Elliott. 

4. Piano Solo — Irene Fox. 

5. Recitation — Orville Frayne. 



190(i EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 345 






6. Song — Joseph Boudreault. 

7. Piano Solo — Horace Valiant. 

8. Recitation — Edna Houser. 

9. Song and Chorus — Girls. 

10. Recitation — Margaret Liggett. 

11. Duet — Roy Goldie and Wilbert Clemmett. 

12. Speech — John McDonald. 

13. Song — Jean Chatelain. 

14. Piano Solo — Leslie Thomas. 

15. Mouth Organ Solo — Horace Valiant. 

16. Recitation — Irene Fox. 

The distribution of the presents on the tree followed. 

At St. Jude's. 

On the evening of February 12th, twenty pupils of the Institution, ac- 
companied by the Principal, paid a visit to the Anglican Young People's 
Association of St. Jude's Church and gave a concert in the schoolroom, Mr. 
Gardiner presiding. The programme was: — 

1. Chopin — Waltz, Op. 64, No. 2. Piano solo. Charles Duff. 

2. Trotere — "The Deathless Army." Vocal solo. Thomas Kennedy. 

3. Deshayes — "King of the Carnival"; Bohm — "La Grace" Waltz. Piano duet. 

Alice Stickley and Victoria Thomson. 

4. Havergal — "The Ministry of Song." Recitation. Grace Kay. 

5. Chopin — "Polonaise," Op. 26, No. 1. Piano solo. Herbert Treneer. 

0. Dr. Dvummond — "The Habitant." Recitation. Joseph Boudreaui/i. 

7. Delahaye — Minuet "Columbine." Piano Solo. Louise Deschenes. 

8. Tozer — "By the River." Vocal duet. Grace Kight and Letitia Spicknell. 
• 9. Engelmann — "Parade Review, Marche Militaire." Piano duet. Cameron 

Allison and Albert Fall. 

10. Braham — ''The Death of Nelson." Vocal solo. John Nicolscn. 

11. Mendelssohn — "Spinning Song." Piano solo. Mary Macdonald. 

12. "Mr. Sandscript's Slide Down Hill." Recitation. Grace Kight. 

13. Chorus — Hunting Song — Girls. 

14. Beta — Lustspiel Overture. Piano duet. C. Duff and H. Treneer. 

At the conclusion refreshments were served to the guests by the members 
of the Society, and a return visit was promised. 

At Grace Church. 

On Feb. 26th a similar visit was made to the Grace Church Society, the 
programme being as follows, with Mr. Wickens in the chair: — 

1. Chopin — Nocturne. Piano solo. Gertrude Coll. 

2. "The Wrong Woman." Recitation. Edna Sage. 

3. Stephen Adams — "The Veteran." Vocal solo. Jos. Boudreault. 

4. Engelmarm — "Marche Militaire." Piano duet. Cameron Allison and Albert 

Fall. 

5. Tennyson — "The Revenge." Recitation. Charles Lavender. 

6. Be Koren — "Winter Lullaby." Vocal solo. Hester Ponting. 

7. Donizetti — "Lucrezia Borgia." Piano duet. Louise Deschenhs and Grace 

Kight- 

8. "The Relief of Lucknow." Recitation. Thomas Kennedy. 

9. Fairlamb — "April Day." Chorus. Girls. 

10. Nevin — "Venetian Love Song," Op. 20, No. 1; Sinding — "Marche Grotesque." 

Charles Dufp. 

11. "The Country Cousins." Dialogue. Grace Kight, Hester Ponting, Louise 

Deschenes and Maud Swetman. 

12. Vanderwater — "The Prodigal." Vocal solo. John Nicolson. 

13. "Children's Dream." Vocal duet. Grace Kight and Hester Ponting. 

14. Neidlinger — "That Little Peach." Quartette. T. Kennedy, J. Nicolson, 

J. Boudreault and C. Lavender. 

15. Bela — Lustspiel Overture. Piano duet. Charles Duff and Herbert Treneer. 

A vote of thanks to the performers was moved by Hev. Dr. Mackenzie, 
after which refreshments were served. 



346 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



A Gymnastic Exhibition. 

The Brantford Courier of March 19th said : The boys at the Institu- 
tion for the Blind are getting their muscle up. The other day seven of 
them, accompanied by Mr. Ramsay, the supervisor, walked from the Insti- 
tution to the second bridge in Paris and back; time, 3 hours, 10 minutes. 
The distance must be over twelve miles, so the record is not bad for begin- 
ners. On Saturday forenoon between 30 and 40 of the public school boys, 
belonging to the Young Men's Christian Association, paid a visit to the 
0. I. B., and, under the direction of Mr. Frederick I. Grobb, gave an ex- 
hibition in the gymnasium. The visitors were very proficient in free gym- 
nastics and mat work, while the Institution boys did better at apparatus 
work, going through their exercises on the horse, the parallels, the hori- 
zontal bar and the ladder. This was the first of a series of visits planned for 
the purpose of showing the members of each class what the others can do, 
with the moral of "Go thou and do likewise" in view. The seniors of the 
Y.M.C.A. are expected at the Institution soon. The blind boys gave three 
hearty cheers for their visitors. Mr. Grobb and Mr. Ramsay have both good 
reason to be proud of their pupils. 

The Institution boys paid a return visit to the Y.M.C.A. on March 22nd. 

Canada Club Debate. 

The Brantford Expositor of March 30th said : The members of the Can- 
ada Club had a very pleasant outing last evening, when, on the invitation 
of Principal Gardiner, they held their regular debate in the assembly hall of 
the O.I.B. About twenty-five members of the club turned out and all the 
teachers and pupils of the Institution were present to listen to the debate. 
The subject was : "Resolved, that the franchise should be extended to 
women." The chair was taken by Mr. T. Durkee, who introduced the speak- 
ers in his usual happy manner. The affirmative was upheld by Messrs. 
T. McPhail, H. K. Jordan, J. R. Yarey and Mangles, the negative being 
supported by Messrs. G. Pickles, F. Britton, A. Tomlinson and S. P. Davies. 
Some strong arguments were brought forth on both sides, the points being 
well defined and forcibly driven home. The judges, Miss Lee and Messrs. 
Ramsay and Boudreault, awarded the decision to the negative. A couple 
of organ selections were given by Mr. H. K. Jordan, and Mr. Gardiner 
then thanked the Club for the entertainment on behalf of himself and the 
pupils of the Institution. Refreshments were afterwards served for the 
members of the Club and a very enjoyable evening was brought to a close 
by singing "God Save the King." 

Singers from the City. 

The newspapers of April 24th reported that about thirty members of the 
Young People's Association of St. Jude's Church visited the Institution for 
the Blind last evening, to entertain the pupils with a concert. Rev. Mr. 
Wright, rector of the church, presided, and he kept the little folks on the 
front seats up to concert pitch by the occasional interpolation of an appro- 
priate story. The programme was made up of vocal selections exclusively, 
a peculiarity which did not detract from its acceptability. Miss May 
Wright's solo, "When the Heart is Young," and her duet with Mr. Adams, 
"Come With Me," were suited to her fine voice, and Miss Carrie Williams 
won every heart with her rendering of "Dearie." She also sang "The Three 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 347 



Wishes." Mr. Scace sang "The Mighty Deep" and "The Bandolero," Mr. 
Darby "The Holy City," and Mr. Adams "If I Were a Knight." Mr. Hol- 
rod sang "The Bedouin Love Song" and "Heroes and Gentleman," the latter 
being encored. A vote of thanks to the visitors was moved and seconded by 
two pupils, Thomas Kennedy and Joseph Boudreault, and was presented 
by the Principal, who suggested an adjournment to the Teachers' Parlor, 
where coffee and cake were served and a social half-hour was pleasantly 
spent. Such visits by the people of the city are highly appreciated by all 
connected with the Institution. 

Brant Avenue Church Choir. 

On May 18th there was another concert in the Music Hall, which was 
thus reported : Forty members of the choir of Brant Avenue Church, under 
the direction of Mr. Henri K. Jordan, contributed to the entertainment of 
the pupils of the Institution for the Blind last evening, and never were sing- 
ers favored with a more appreciative audience. Among the soloists were Mr. 
R. Overend in "0 Lord Correct Me," Miss B. Schmidlin in "The Swallows," 
Miss L. Elliott in "The Carnival," and Mr. R. W. Crooks in "Heroes and 
Gentlemen" and "If All the Young Maidens," all encored, and the choir 
rendered "Holy Art Thou," "Night" and "Hear, Lord, When I Cry," 
with piano accompaniment, and "A Slumber Song" and "Hark, Hark, My 
Soul," unaccompanied. The men of the choir sang "My Love is Like a 
Red, Red Rose," and Miss Leone Park recited very acceptably. A social 
half-hour was spent by the visitors after the concert ty the Teachers' Parlor. 

June Closing Concert. 

The closing concert was held on June 18th. It was reported as fol- 
lows : Standing room was at a premium in the Music Hall of the Institu- 
tion for the Blind last night, the attraction being the closing concert in 
connection with the end of the session. Soon after seven o'clock the people 
began to assemble, and when the doors were opened at eight there were 
more waiting than could possibly be accommodated. In spite of the dis- 
comfort, the hall remained crowded to the end, and all seemed to be pleased 
with the entertainment provided. 

Principal Gardiner, in welcoming the audience, apologized for the ab- 
sence of Mr. Colquhoun, Deputy Minister of Education, and of Mayor 
Waterous, who had been invited. He briefly outlined the work of the ses- 
sion, during which the total registration of pupils was 123. At the opening 
in September, 107 entered, and 16 more came in during the session. For 
various causes 12 left before the end of the session, leaving 111 in attend- 
ance. The main endeavors of the teachers were directed to giving all the 
pupils a good English education. But something was done in the way of 
accomplishments and in the industrial line. There were 62 pupils in music, 
19 in piano tuning, 6 in domestic science, 20 in sewing, 41 in knitting and 
crocheting, 21 in cane chair seating, 5 in hammock netting, 51 in bead 
work and 17 in Latin. Mr. Gardiner said he liked to have the people of 
Brantford take a sort of proprietary interest in the Institution, but it was 
common to expect too much from the blind. Wonders were accomplished, 
but there were limitations. Let the men before him think how hard they 
had to work to support their families, and pay their debts, and how little 
they had left at the end of the year; then let them empty their pockets and 
shut their eyes and see how much they could earn, even with the advantages 
of knowledge, experience and acquired skill. That was the way to look at 



348 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




190G EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 349 



the case of the blind, and from that point of view he felt well pleased with 
accomplished results and with prospects for the future. He was glad to say 
that the health of the pupils had been good and their conduct exemplary. 
The conduct of the programme was handed over to Mr. Humphries. 

The programme, which was carried out without loss of time, and with 
the greatest credit to all the performers, was undoubtedly one of the most 
enjoyable ever presented at an Institution concert. Former standards were 
well upheld, and in some particulars considerably exceeded; and, although 
comparisons are not always in order, it was a matter of general remark among 
those who observe the progress of the pupils from year to year, that the 
graduates in piano, Miss Ponting and Miss Macdonald, reached the highest 
point of excellence yet attained. The fact that this session two young ladies 
obtained the degree of Associate of the Toronto College of Music (A.T.C.M.) 
marks the breaking of all records in the musical history of the 0. I. B., 
and must be a matter of sincere gratification to the Musical Director, Mr. 
Humphries, and his able assistants in that department. In addition to the 
graduates, 21 certificates of the Toronto College of Music were obtained by 
other pupils. 

The programme was as fellows : — 

Organ—" Triumphal March " Fan Ikes. 

Louise Deschk.mes. 

Part Song— " Water Lilies " Cowen . 

Choral Claws. 

Recitation—" The Little Word that was Lost " . Wide Awa\e. 

John Macdonald. 

Two Pianos—" Valse in A Flat " Moskowsld. 

Thomas Kennedy and Cameron Allison. 
Herbert Treneer and Albert Fall. 

Song— ' ' The Leprechaun " May Gillington . 

Nine Kindergarten uhildren. 

Recitation—" The Cry of the Children " Mrs. E. B. Browning. 

Isabel Elliott. 

Part Song—" There Sits a Bird on Yonder Tree " Walthew ( Words by Ingoldsby) . 

Choral Class. 

Piano — " Concerto in G Minor," with Orchestral Accompaniment Mendelssohn. 

Mary Macdonald. 

Recitation—" The Baby Actor " St. Nicholas. 

Edna Sage. 

Seven Part Anthem — " A Solemn Prayer," from "The Holy Innocents" Herbert Brewer . 

Choral Class. 

Two Pianos—" Humoresque " . . Watson . 

Esta Wolsey and Margaret Liggett. 
George Skinkle and Charles Lavender. 

Recitation — " The Homesick Boy " Anonymous. 

Harry White. 

Part Song— " The Boy and the Bee " Caldicolt . 

Choral Class. 

Piano — " Grande Polonaise Brillante," with Orchestral Accompaniment Chopin . 

Hester Ponting. 

Recitation — " Domestic Economy " Anonymous . 

Emma Rooke. 

Part Song — " Soldiers' Song," from Shakspeare's " Othello" 

Choral Class. 

Concerted—" Overture to ' Stradella ' " Floioio . 

Pianos — Alice Stickley and Victoria Thomson. 
Grace Kay and Gertrude Coll. 
Grace Kight and Eva Bullock. 
Organ— Charles Duff. 

Presentation of Diplomas and Certificates. 
God Save the King. 



350 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Although of such, length, this list 01 interesting selections was car- 
ried through in an admirably sustained manner, which left small room for 
distinctions. The recitations were marked by that clearness of enuncia- 
tion and flexibility of voice which always characterize the 0. I. B. pupils, 
and little Master Harry White made such an impression with his "Home- 
sick Boy" that he had to be brought forward in reply to an enthusiastic 
recall. 

The Choral Class well upheld its reputation for finished work, and 
sang five numbers with splendid attention to expression, clearness and sharp- 
ness of attack; the male section seemed to be more than usually strong 
and covered themselves with honors in the "Soldiers' Song" from Othello. 

In the piano concertos the soloists weie accompanied by the Darwen 
Orchestra and the pipe organ, Mr. Humphries conducting in the absence 
of Dr. Torrington, who usually performs that duty. Miss Mary Macdonald 
gave a splendid rendering of the Presto movement of Mendelssohn's G 
Minor Concerto, and Miss Hester Ponting accomplished a veritable "tour 
de force" in her playing of the long and extremely difficult "Grand Polon- 
aise," by Chopin, without break or flaw of any kind and with charming 
attention to the requirements of expression. 

At the close of the programme the diplomas and certificates were pre- 
sented. Rev. Mr. Harvey and Mr. Passmore handed the diplomas to the 
graduates and congratulated them in neat speeches. The successful pupils 
were : — 

A.T.C.M. — Hester Ponting, Mary Macdonald. 

Third Year Piano — Mary Macdonald (honors). 

Second Year Piano — Alice Stickley (first-class honors), Thomas Ken- 
nedy (honors), Grace Kay, Gertrude Coll. 

First Year Piano — Eleanor Wooldridge, Edward Simpson, Horace Val- 
iant, Beatrice McCannan (first-class honors), Margaret Liggett, Charles 
Lavender, Enie Ferguson (honors). 

Second Year Theory— Mary Macdonald, urace Kight, Grace Kay (first- 
class honors), Herbert Treneer (honors). 

First Year Theory — Anna Victoria Thomson, Alice Stickley (first-class 
honors), Thomas Kennedy, Gertrude Coll (honors), Eva Bullock (pass). 

ATHLETICS. 

The past year has witnessed a great improvement in the physique of the 
male pupils, due to a great extent to the interest aroused in gymnasium work 
and outdoor sports by the enthusiasm and labor of Supervisor Ramsay. On 
October 21st (Trafalgar Day) the programme of sports included the follow- 
ing : — 

Junior Events. 

25-yard race, under 10 years — William G. Thompson, Neil McKinnon, 
Wilbert Clemmett. 

50 yards run — Norman McDonald, David Graham, Jean Chatelain. 

Long jump — Floyd Sager, Orville Frayne, Charles McBride. 

Kicking the football — Floyd Sager, Charles McBride, Norman McDon- 
ald. 

Throwing baseball — Floyd Sager, Norman McDonald, Charles McBride. 

Three-legged race — N. McDonald and 0. Frayne, W. Clemmett and W. 
Thompson, F. Sager and C. McBride. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 351 



Wheelbarrow race — 0. Frayne and N. McDonald, J. Chatelain and F. 
Sager, W. Thompson and W. Clemmett. 

Standing high jump — C. McBride, D. Graham, N. McDonald. 

Senior Events. 

Standing high jump — George. Stokes, Thomas Kennedy, Cameron Alli- 
son. 

Pole vault — George Stokes, Albert Fall, Horace Valiant. 

100 yards dash — T. Kennedy, A. Fall, Joseph Boudreault. 

220 yards run— T. Kennedy) A. Fall. 

Putting the shot — John Hughes, T. Kennedy, J. Boudreault. 

Standing long jump — T. Kennedy, G. Stokes, A. Fall. 

Standing hop, step, and jump — T. Kennedy, G. Stokes, J. Hughes. 

Kicking football— G. Stokes, A. Fall, J. Hughes. 

Half-mile walk (partners) — Hughes and Kennedy, Nicolson and Bou- 
dreault. 

Throwing baseball — T. Kennedy, A. Fall, J. Boudreault. 

Wheelbarrow race — Kennedy and Hughes, Fall and Skinkle. 

Three-legged race — Fall and Skinkle, Kennedy and Hughes. 

On February 17th there was a gymnasium contest with the "horse," 
the "Whites" (N. McDonald, O. Frayne, W. Thompson, A. Lott and C. 
McBride) defeating the "Beds" (O. Mealing, J. Chatelain, D. Graham, 
G. Graham, and W. Crew) by 450 points to 439 in these events : 

Kneel and jump. 

Kneel, stand and jump. 

Kneel, stand and double straddle jump. 

Roll over back and squat. 

Roll over and stand. 

Scissors. 

Shears. 

Straddle. 

Centre straddle. 

Open event. 

On March 3rd there was a gymnasium contest in which seniors as well 
as juniors took part, a careful record being kept of points earned. 

June 9th was the great field day, but the programme was so extensive 
that part of it had to be postponed until the succeeding Saturday. The local 
papers contained the following report of these games: — 

Blind Boys' SroRTS. 

The pupils of the Ontario Institution for the Blind turned out in full 
force on Saturday afternoon to witness or participate in a programme of 
games and races for which some of them had been training for a considerable 
time. 

The events really began on Friday night, when John Hughes (totally 
blind) won the three-mile road race in 21 minutes, being accompanied by 
Mr. George Ramsay, the supervisor of the boys, while the leading team in 
the junior one-mile race was composed of Orville Frayne (totally blind) and 
Jean Chatelain, who has some sight. They ran hand in hand. 

The Saturday contests included a standing long jump, juniors — Norman 
McDonald, 6 feet 1} inches; Geo. Stokes, seniors, 8 feet 6 inches. 

Standing long jump with pole, seniors — Cameron Allison, 12 feet \ inch. 



352 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 353 



High jump, juniors — 0. Frayne, 3 feet 1 inch. 

Throwing four-pound discus — Thos. Kennedy, 82 feet 10 inches. 

Race for 220 yards — T. Kennedy, 30 seconds. 

Dash for 50 yards — O. Frayne, time 8 seconds. 

The running track was smooth, but not straight, nor was it wide enough. 
Some of the racers had to start in the long grass, which occasioned some 
fumbles. The blind racers had to follow the sound of a string of bells which 
were carried by Mr. Ramsay, who ran ahead of them, and it was wonderful 
how they all managed to locate the sound. In the animal races, wheelbar- 
row, and three-legged races, which were run on the cricket ground, the col- 
lisions were frequent, but no one was hurt. Mr. Roney and Mr. F. Grobb 
acted as timers and judges. The events for which there was no time on Sat- 
urday were the half-mile walk, high jumping, pole vaulting, football punts, 
baseball throwing, quoiting match, and tug of war. These were postponed 
till next Saturday. The leading contestants for the senior championship are 
Thomas Kennedy of Guelph, and Harold Elnor of Toronto; for the junior, 
Norman McDonald of Wingham, David Graham of Birnam, and Orville 
Frayne of Forest. 

One of the contestants had a special paragraph for himself, under the 
heading, "Blind Boy's Feat": — 

"At the O.I.B. sports held recently, a blind boy named George Stokes 
made a most remarkable stand jump. Despite the fact that he is totally 
unable to see, he cleared 8 feet 8 inches, without the use of hand weights or 
other assistance. George is a boy of IT years, and pretty sturdily built." 

Should this record of the work of Institution boys in the athletic field 
seem incredible, the following article by Percy Trenchard in "Physical Cul- 
ture" for May, 1906, will help to explain how these things are done: — 

"How impossible — that boys hopelessly blind can compete in field 
sports. This will be the first exclamation of those who read that there has 
actually been planned a great athletic meet of the blind athletes of the coun- 
try. Should a doubt be expressed in the presence of the blind themselves, it 
is probable that some indignation would be expressed at the mere suggestion 
of anything wonderful in sightless persons running, jumping, or throwing 
the weights like their more fortunate fellows who can see. Not only can the 
blind perform almost all the feats of the modern athletes, but they have a 
strong objection 1o having such an almost incredible ability characterized as 
'wonderful/ 

"At the Institution for the Blind at Overbrook, near Philadelphia, the 
boys are straining every nerve to get in condition for the proposed series of 
national contests among sightless athletes, the first meet of its kind in the 
history of sport. The closer one views the seemingly impossible tasks that 
the blind boys have set themselves, the easier it is to understand how they are 
able to run like the wind, jump long distances, play football, and do almost 
anything in the athletic line that is apparently impossible without sight. 

"The boy who was practising at putting the shot when the writer visited 
the institution was using a shot with a rope attached to it. When he had 
balanced himself and thrown the shot it would be impossible for anyone who 
did not know the fact to tell that the boy was blind. The confidence, the 
poise, and the cast were all as natural as though done by a boy with perfect 
sight. Only when the boy began to haul in the line could it be seen that he 
was afflicted with blindness. As he hauled in he measured the length of his 

23 ED. 



354 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



'put' by the line, and as he poised himself for a second attempt, it was evi- 
dently with the determination of causing a greater length of line to trail 
after the weight. Very simple, after all, for a boy to be a shot-putter, al- 
though unable to tell where the shot falls by eyesight. 

"So with the sprinters. Two boys at a little distance from the shot- 
putter were practicing the sprint. Beside each boy was a taut wire and on 
the wire was a spool. Each boy grasped his spool and as the word was given 
to start, ran with the speed of a deer and with every bit as much confidence, 
the spool jingling along the taut wire and holding the boy to his course. 
As long as he held to the spool he knew that he had a clear field. 

"The long jump, standing, presents little difficulty. The boy is placed 
at the mark and jumps as far as he can. His jump is measured, marked, and 
it is the turn of the next contestant. The high jump, standing, is more dif- 
ficult, but with the wonderful sense of distance that the blind possess by 
touch, it is only necessary for one of the sightless athletes to be placed oppo- 
site the marks and allowed to feel the height of the bar and he is ready for 
the signal. It is asserted upon the authority of Edward E. Allen, well 
known as an instructor of the blind, that when a blind boy runs at full speed 
he is doing the most daring feat of which a blind person is capable. At this 
institution and at many others throughout the country where boys are train- 
ing for the contemplated athletic meet of the blind, many sightless athletes 
can be seen daily in fine weather and in the indoor gymnasiums during dull 
days, practising both the run and jump with all the confidence and abandon 
of persons with perfect sight. 

"As for doing stunts on the trapeze, the flying rings or the vaulting horse, 
any blind athlete would think the person joking who professed to think there 
was anything out of the ordinary in these. If you suggest to one of the 
instructors that it is still more wonderful how the boys find the apparatus 
without being led up to it, the instructor will probably agree that this is 
one of the really remarkable things about them. A person born blind has 
no sense of distance as revealed by sight. He merely goes by the count of 
footsteps. Let him once locate the flying rings or the trapeze in the gym- 
nasium and he will thereafter go from one point to another so many steps, 
from that point to another so many more, and so in time will reach his 
objective without seeming to do anything but walk direct to it, as though 
really able to see where it stands on the floor or is suspended from the ceiling. 

"Another apparent joke is to say that blind boys play football, and yet 
they actually do, and a game of football will probably be a feature of the 
coming meet. The ball is located by sound. As played by blind boys, the 
game is more of a kicking game than the ordinary college game. The play- 
ers strain every nerve to hear the sound of the ball striking the ground. The 
boy who hears it first runs in the direction of the sound, grabs the ball and 
kicks it towards the opposing side's territory. There is no tackling. When 
the ball is kicked behind the opposing players' goal line, the side kicking it 
wins." 

MASSAGE. 

In last year's Report I gave an account of what had been attempted and' 
accomplished in Europe and America in teaching the blind how to adminis- 
ter massage. Mr. Robert John Park, who was a pupil in this Institution 
from 1897 to 1901, has since taken a course at the Toronto Orthopedic Hos- 

23a ED. 



1900 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 355 



pital, and for the encouragement of others the following testimonial to his 
efficiency is reprinted : — 

249 Park street, Peterborough, 
4th July, 1906. 

Permit me to call your attention to a matter which may interest you 
and which may be of much significance to an unfortunate class of the com- 
munity. It is known by those who have directed their thought to the matter 
that blind persons, though in every way the equals of their sighted fellows, 
are, by reason of their blindness, placed at a great disadvantage in earning 
their living, and in their efforts to serve their fellow men. Mr. Robert J. 
Park, a young man totally blind, has recently taken a full course of training 
in order to qualify himself to give massage, and in this move he is the 
pioneer in Canada. His teachers at the Toronto Orthopedic Hospital state 
that his course has been a highly creditable one. His success in this work 
will mean much for the blind of Canada, thus opening up a new occupation 
for a class of persons greatly handicapped. On behalf of Mr. Park, and in 
the interests of a deserving class, I ask your favorable consideration of this 
matter in securing for him employment in his chosen work. 

Having known Mr. Park intimately for many years, I am very glad to 
bear testimony to the excellence of his moral character. His life is above 
reproach. 

Messages sent to the Toronto Orthopedic Hospital will reach him. 

Sincerely yours, 

Arthur W. Beall. 

EMPLOYMENT FOE THE BLIND. 

In previous Reports I have endeavored to interest members of the Legis- 
lature, editors of newspapers and other readers in the difficult problem of 
enabling the blind to earn their living by their own labor. Those who have 
not looked deeply into the subject are apt to underestimate the difficulty. 
They have read of Helen Keller, or have perhaps met a blind man who was 
successful in some business or profession, and have drawn the natural infer- 
ence that what was possible for one blind person could not be impossible for 
another. Tet the fact remains that blindness is a serious handicap, and the 
problem of self-support has been made more difficult by the adaptation of 
machinery to the production of many commodities formerly made by hand. 
Even in the few handicrafts still available, the competition of sighted labor 
reduces the wages of blind labor to a minimum upon which it would be hard 
to keep body and soul together. This is recognized in Great Britain and 
other countries, where the chief endeavor of philanthropists is to collect 
money to bridge the gap between the earnings of the blind and the cost of 
their subsistence, and to distribute it without pauperizing the recipients. 

In various parts of the United States ladies' committees have been 
formed to ameliorate the condition of the blind. I received a letter of 
inquiry from the State of Washington, enclosing a newspaper clipping which 
stated that, "in accordance with a resolution adopted at a meeting of the 
State Confederation of Women's Clubs, held at Walla Walla, a committee 
had been appointed to investigate the condition of the blind in the State and 
report upon steps that might be taken to better their condition. How the 
condition of the blind may be improved and their burdens lightened is the 
problem to be considered by the committee. They will endeavor to arouse 



356 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



public interest in the question to such an extent that something definite will 
be accomplished." I sent this answer to the chairman's letter: 

"Brantford, 25th Jan., 1906. Mrs. J. B. Blalock, Apartment A, Metro- 
pole, Spokane, Wash., U.S. : Dear Madam, — The making of willow baskets 
was for some years a favorite industry here, but of late the profits have been 
so small, on account of the competition of factory products, that we are doing 
practically nothing in that line. The general report from ex-pupils is that 
it takes more time to sell the baskets than to make them, and as the blind 
man's work is generally defective, the trade will not provide a living. Of 
course, a man who has a home, either with his parents, or in a charitable 
institution, can earn his clothing and pocket money at basket-making, or 
hammock-making, or broom-making, especially if he has someone to look 
after the sales, but few men fully support themselves by handicraft. Some 
are doing well as piano tuners in factories — they do not generally succeed at 
custom work, on account of their inability to make repairs — but the best 
results are achieved by men who canvass or peddle. A man who loses his 
sight after he becomes adult is rarely able to become proficient as a tuner. 
The problem you are so nobly endeavoring to solve has puzzled educators of 
the blind for generations, and I fear that the solution is becoming more and 
more difficult, as competition among the seeing becomes keener and factory 
work is more specialized. Leading educators, like Mr. Wait, of New York, 
and Mr. Anagnos, of Boston, recommend the discontinuance of teaching 
handicrafts, and the substitution of higher education, as for the professions, 
but with many children that is simply impracticable, and in the case of a 
laboring man who loses his sight by accident or disease it sounds like a mock- 
ery. I send you a couple of reports of this Institution— the latest is in type, 
but not yet distributed — and will be glad to receive the results of your in- 
vestigations. I am sorry that I cannot give you more information or more 
comfort, but if I knew just what you want to know, I would feel that my 
value had increased many fold." 

Noticing that a meeting of the New York State Association for Promot- 
ing the Interests of the Blind was to be held at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, 
I wrote to Miss Winifred Holt, the Secretary, who sent me a kind letter 
enclosing newspaper reports of the meeting, from which I gathered that 
Mark Twain had made an amusing speech, and was followed by Mr. Joseph 
H. Choate, while letters were read from Grover Cleveland and Helen Keller. 
The latter wrote : — 

"To know what the blind man needs, you who can see must imagine 
what it would be not to see, and you can imagine it more vividly if you re- 
member that before your journey's end you may have to go the dark way 
yourself. Try to realize what blindness means to those whose joyous activity 
is stricken to inaction. It is to live long, long days, and life is made up of 
days. It is to live immured, baffled, impotent, all God's world shut out. It 
is to sit helpless, defrauded, while your spirit strains and tugs at its fetters, 
and your shoulders ache for the burden they are denied, the rightful burden 
of labor. The seeing man goes about his business confident and self-depend- 
ent. He does his share of the work of the world in mine, in quarry, in fac- 
tory, in counting room, asking of others no boon save the opportunity to do 
a man's part and to receive the laborer's guerdon. In an instant, accident 
blinds him. The day is blotted out. Night envelopes all the visible world. 
The feet which once bore him to his task with firm and confident stride 
stumble and halt and fear the forward step. He is forced to a new habit of 
idleness, which, like a canker, consumes the mind and destroys its beautiful 



1<J06 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 357 



faculties. Memory confronts him with his lighted past. Amid the tangible 
ruins of his life as it promised to be he gropes his pitiful way. You have 
met him on your busy thoroughfares with faltering feet and outstretched 
hands, patiently 'dredging' the universal dark,, holding out for sale his petty 
wares, or his cap for your pennies, and this was a man with ambitions and 
capabilities. It is because we know these ambitions and capabilities can be 
fulfilled that we are working to improve the condition of the adult blind. 
You cannot bring back the light to the vacant eyes; but you can give a help- 
ing hand to the sightless along their dark pilgrimage. You can teach them 
new skill. For work they once did with the aid of their eyes you can substi- 
tute work that they can do with their hands. They ask only opportunity, 
and opportunity is a torch in darkness. They crave no charity, no pension, 
but the satisfaction that comes from lucrative toil, and this satisfaction is 
the right of every human being. At your meeting New York will speak its 
word for the blind, and when New York speaks the world listens." 

At the time of this meeting the Association had been in existence five 
months, and it proposed to establish workshops for blind men and blind 
women; also classes for reading, writing, and trades for the adult blind, 
and visitors and home teachers for the adult blind. The officers asked for 
$15,000 to begin with. 

By sending Reports and marked papers to Ontario newspapers, I have 
managed to provoke some discussion of the employment problem, one writer 
suggesting that the Ontario Government should appoint a commission to 
make a thorough and impartial inquiry into the needs of the blind of On- 
tario. Such inquiries have been made in other countries, notably by the 
Royal Commission on the Condition of the Blind, whose Report was pre- 
sented to both Houses of the British Parliament in 1889. From that Report 
I have extracted a mass of evidence, relating to matters of common interest 
to all countries in which there is necessity for provision for the blind. It 
will well repay perusal by all who have not yet been impressed with the diffi- 
culty of the employment problem, as well as by those who take an interest 
in the literary and musical education of the blind. 

EVIDENCE TAKEN BEFORE THE BRITISH ROYAL COMMISSION. 

George Martin Tait — The late Lord Shaftesbury often spoke of how in 
his early days the blind used to be shut up in cellars and places like that 
when it was thought that nothing could be done for them; that is now very 
much altered. 

A considerable number of blind are to be found in the streets of London, 
begging. They fall back. Perhaps they started fairly well with some indus- 
trial work, or as musicians, but there is a very strong inducement to make a 
profit out of what they consider a piece of personal property, namely, the 
sympathy of the sighted for the blind man. It is a stock in trade to them, 
and very many are induced to make use of it. 

They are the very poorest of the poor; blindness is very largely caused 
by vice and evil surroundings. Once you get the houses of the people im- 
proved, their condition improved, their education improved, and their sur- 
roundings improved, you will find that blindness will depart from our midst 
to a very great extent. 

Rev. J". P. Faunthorpe — Music is generally thought to be that for which 
the blind has a more especial faculty, as it goes by touch. But to train blind 
boys or girls with a view to their getting their bread partly, or if you like 



358 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



wholly, by teaching music, or by becoming professors of music, or even 
organists, is in its way a very great mistake, because you necessarily are 
keeping out more competent persons. I think all blind people should be 
taught music, as a civilizing element, but as a way of getting their bread, 
never. 

Miss Lovell — A great many of the elder girls are physically strong. 
They like to do housework, and they do it very fairly and enjoy it. Ther 
begin by sweeping and scrubbing, washing all their own tea things and 
breakfast things, and so on, laying tables and clearing away, making beds, 
cleaning boots, and cleaning plate. At first they require much superintend- 
ence and assistance from sighted persons. We keep no nurse for the little 
ones. The elder girls do everything for them. 

We have a great many brought to us at the age of eight who cannot hold 
a spoon and they would not know the top of a pinafore from the bottom of 
it. Some of them never come to anything, and it is just because they have 
been brought up as babies, nursed and fed and carried down stairs, and their 
clothes put on, and never told which was one thing and which was another. 

One of our girls does her mother's housework, and she does knitting and 
chair caning, and entirely supports herself and partly supports her mother. 

Miss Weaver — As a rule, blind children become good spellers, better, I 
think, than seeing children when they have been the same time at school. 

Eev. B. G. Johns — A very large proportion of them earn by their trade 
a considerable sum towards their living. Basket making and mat making 
are the two trades in which they succeed best. 

Fifteen out of sixteen of my pupils believe that they have a gift for 
music; ten out of sixteen believe that they have a heaven-born genius for 
music. I should say half of them could be taught music fairly well. 

We try to prevent blind men marrying blind women, but it is exceed- 
ingly hard to check. 

We have found it almost universally true that a boy who attempts to 
master two trades fails in one certainly, and possibly in both. 

A few customers will buy from a blind man because he is blind, but a 
great many will not buy from him because he is blind; they think that it is 
an inferior basket that he makes. 

Blind basket-makers in ordinary workshops with sighted people are 
looked upon disagreeably; the sighted people do not help them as they might, 
or as you would expect they would. They seem to think that it is a sort of 
interference with their chartered rights, and that the blind man ought to be 
somewhere by himself out of their way. 

William Hibbert — I would have blind children taught a trade at the 
proper time, but not in childhood; certainly not till they are 14 or 15 
years of age. Sighted children, whether boys or girls, are not apprenticed 
till they are 14 or 15. Sighted workmen work three or four times as fast as 
the blind; even in chair-caning a blind person would take from four to five 
hours for one chair which a sighted person could do in one hour, taking the 
day through. A blind person works much slower than a sighted person. 

The majority of those I have met have become blind after they have 
arrived at the age of 40 years, when it is impossible for them to be taught 
trades to earn anything by; because if they learn a trade they never gain 
sufficient speed to do anything; the young ones are very slow who are taught 
from childhood, and the elder ones must necessarilv be slower. 






1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 359 



There is one advantage in chair caning, that it requires no tools and it 
takes no room. 

Blind children, brought up by themselves, distort their features, they 
wriggle and twist and shake themselves about, and all manner of things. 

The German system, under which the blind institutions look after their 
pupils as long as they require assistance, is an incentive to morality. 

In some instances blind women have married, and they have always per- 
formed the household duties, even to washing and ironing, and mending and 
making. 

William Tibbies (blind) — A knowledge of a trade, acquired as early as 
ten, makes a child more proficient than if learned later, provided the train- 
ing is sufficiently prolonged. 

R. B. Carter — Cases of blindness from birth are very rare. Blindness is 
uot hereditary. The scientific definition of blindness is the absence of light 
perception, and the practical definition of blindness is a state in which no 
occupation can be followed for which vision is required. 

J. L. Shadwell — Blind children do better in special schools than in or- 
dinary schools. Whereas for an ordinary child a home is, generally speaking, 
better than a school, for a blind child a school is better than a home. If a 
blind child is at home, its parents and brothers and sisters are constantly 
liable to do too much for it, whereas at a school, where everybody cannot be 
waited upon, the blind children are forced to wait upon themselves, and that 
is a very good thing for them. The blind get too much in the habit of ex- 
pecting things to be done for them, so that they do not learn to do things for 
themselves. 

Alfred Midwinter — Basket makers labor under the disadvantage of im- 
perfect teaching. They require long experience, though it is the best trade 
possible, perhaps, for a blind man to learn young, because he is able to begin 
and finish his work without any sighted assistance when he has learned the 
trade. That is not the case in any other trade that I know of which the blind 
are capable of working at, and in order to get the necessary skill to be able 
to wt)rk with sufficient dexterity and quickness to enable him to get a living, 
he requires a long practice because there is an infinite variety in basket-mak- 
ing. 

J. J. Mills — Some blind people never will be able, however long they 
are taught, to earn sufficient to keep themselves. The more you throw blind 
people upon their own resources the better for them. A great many blind 
are spoiled from not being dealt with in that way. A boy ought to start his 
industrial training when he is about ten years old, after he has learned to 
read and write. 

Miss Rye — We begin to teach the girls knitting directly they are able 
to hold knitting pins, but, of course, when children are so young, their edu- 
cation is the principal thing first. I believe in giving the blind a better edu- 
cation than some of them receive, and we go in for a thoroughly good Eng- 
lish education. We allow them a month to learn how to dress themselves. 
I do not believe in mixing blind children with sighted children. They feel 
their affliction far more when they are with children who can see, and they 
are not nearly so happy as they are by themselves. I have often thought that 
it is a great pity that some employment for the blind cannot be introduced 
which is more lucrative. The handicrafts that they learn are so badly paid 
for. Knitting is very slow work, and it is impossible for a woman to support 
herself entirely by knitting stockings. 



360 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Miss Phoebe Hamilton — The great requirement in the case of young 
blind children is that bad physical habits should be corrected. I do not 
know of anything girls can be taught by which they can earn their own live- 
lihood. They can earn just a little, but not much more than mere pocket 
money, by knitting. 

Mr. W. C. Lester — I see no objection to the establishment of wholesale 
depots where materials could be kept and sold at cost price to the blind, and 
where the articles manufactured could be stored and distributed; the only 
thing is that the blind man must have his earnings supplemented. 

Mr. Alfred Willis (blind) — In answer to the question, "Should some 
provision be made for the blind after they leave these institutions?" : They 
would be very thankful that it should be done. Speaking not only from my 
own personal experience at the time I was at the St. John's Wood school, but 
from what many pupils from various schools have told me, the whole school 
experience is, as it were, overshadowed with a gloom as to the future, and the 
constant thought was, "What shall I do when the time has expired?" No- 
body could get a livelihood at chair-caning. I only know one man who 
could do three chairs a day, at about Td. a chair; the average is two. I know 
only one man who is making a living at basket-making. He partly supports 
himself by getting work from the tramway company. I do not know of any 
mat maker who is working; they cannot get anything for what they do. I 
know a man earning 6s. or Ts. a week at woodchopping, at home. I have 
fourteen persons who are getting their living in various ways, selling tea and 
other commodities. 

Henry J. Wilson — The trust was founded by a bequest of the late Mr. 
Henry Gardner, who left £300,000 for the benefit of the blind in England 
and Wales. The money is to be divided into ninths; two-ninths have to be 
given in instruction to the blind in trades, handicrafts and professions, in- 
cluding the profession of music ; two-ninths for instruction for the profession 
of music only; two-ninths for instruction in trades, handicrafts and profes- 
sions other than the profession of music, and the remaining three-ninths are 
to be applied in providing pensions or grants, and generally in such other 
way as the committee may think best for the benefit of the blind. I think 
that the schools ought to keep touch with their old pupils who have learned 
a trade, at any rate for a certain number of years, and that a bonus should 
be given, if possible, by the schools to those who are starting on their own 
account and are really deserving and in need. 

Henry Smith — The principal trade at the Kensington workshop is bas- 
kets. The stock has been accumulating very largely; it is difficult to com- 
pete with the East End people, and more particularly in the brush depart- 
ment. We sometimes give to one of our men, employed in the brush depart- 
ment, chair-caning for his wife to do at home. I think that fresh branches 
of trade should be opened out to the blind. I could guarantee that our blind 
people can manufacture baskets as well as any seeing person. There are 
more brush makers than basket makers, but the basket makers get more 
wages. Scrubbing brushes cost us to make, taking wages and material and 
one thing and another, about 7s. a dozen, and to get them sold we must sell 
them at 5s. a dozen, that is to say, if we compete with wholesale people. The 
workman has about 9d. profit for caning a common-size chair, and he would 
be able to do two a day. 

Henry Wilkinson— I am a basket maker by trade; learned it at the 
Bristol Asylum. I have been making a very respectable living for the last 
62 years, but I did not depend upon my trade. I married a wife who had a 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 301 



mangle, and I earned more money by assisting my wife at the mangle than I 
did at my trade. Very few sighted basket makers would care to take a blind 
man into his workshop, because a blind man's work would not in general be 
so good as a sighted man's work. A blind man cannot make such a beautiful 
shaped basket as a sighted man. I never worked upon a mould myself, 
though I have heard talk of blind men working upon a mould, but I know 
so far as this, that if you had a mould to work upon it would incline the 
work to run to the left, to screw round to the left as you work to the right. 
I have cased a great many jars and bottles, and I found that it was like work- 
ing on a mould to put basket work round a stone jar. In doing that, if a 
man is not very careful the work will run all round to the left. 

Mathias Roth, M.D. — People say you can do nothing for congenital 
blindness, but we know that this congenital blindness is caused in many cases 
by the intermarriage of blind persons; a second cause of this congenital 
blindness is intermarriage between near relations. In all industrial work, if 
you are to do it properly, you must feel in your head what you do with your 
body; that is more important for a blind person than for a sighted person; 
therefore, I believe it is of the greatest importance to give the maximum 
of health, the maximum of power, and the maximum of strength to every 
blind child, in order to enable him to learn some industry. In Denmark, 
everyone that is blind is brought up to some industrial occupation. I have 
been at Copenhagen, Christiania, and Stockholm. The blind in those places 
are engaged in mat-making, rope-making, chair-making, basket-making and 
cabinet-making. I saw shoe-making only in Christiania. So far as I saw, 
they work in workshops, but in Denmark the director told me that many of 
those who have been taught some trade go home and their friends provide 
them with the necessary materials, and the work they do, if they cannot sell 
it in the country, is sent back to Copenhagen, where they have a central 
depot, in which such work is sold. They have done more there in the way 
of making the blind independent than they have anywhere else; they keep 
an eye upon them after they leave the institution, and then in the town wher- 
ever they are they invite a few people to look after them, and, as far as they 
can, help them. In some cases they earn all they want and do not want any 
extra support; in other cases they do not earn enough and their earnings 
have to be supplemented. I have not seen the German institutions at work; 
in France they are beginning now to have workshops. 

Rev. Henry Bright — Of course, I fully believe in self-help and employ- 
ment for the blind so far as that employment can be obtained. How we are 
to get over the difficulty, however, that a great number of the blind who 
leave our institutions have neither home nor capital I really do not know; I 
hope this is a point which the Royal Commission will tell us something about 
by-and-by ; but I find a good number of persons who have been taught in in- 
stitutions in more indigent circumstances, I rather think, than they were 
before those persons went to the institutions at all. I do not exactly mean 
that they have not learnt any trade sufficiently to be able to earn their live- 
lihood by it, but a person is generally sent to an institution by the sympathy 
of a number of friends, and when that person is supposed to have learnt his 
trade, whether he has or has not, those friends naturally feel that they have 
done what they could. The consequence is that that blind person is minus 
some of the friendship and interest when he leaves the institution, because his 
friends believe that they have placed him, by their influence and sympathy, 
upon the basis of self-help, and so he comes out minus some of the friends 
that he might have had before he went in, and yet he has neither home in 
which nor capital with which to pursue his duties. 



362 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Bobert Storey — A youth you can get on with very well, but when a man 
gets to 25 or 30 years of age he had better not touch basket-making at all, — 
it is a complete failure. That I have specimens of with me now at work. I 
have one young fellow, a clever lad, about 20 years old now; I have had 
him with me about three years, and he can make things almost as well as I 
can myself. Another man has been there live or six years, and he can 
scarcely do anything well, and he began as a man. Let them start work at 
about 14, that is plenty soon enough. I think that basket-making should 
take five years, but that depends a great deal upon the men that they have to 
put them forward. It wants a thoroughly experienced man to teach the 
blind, and the man must have wonderful patience. You may bestow all the 
pains you can on one man and you cannot put it into his head, and cannot 
teach him; he cannot remember it. 

Isaac Thomas Price — I was at St. John's Wood for about 10 or 11 years; 
during that time I studied music as a profession; I was not taught any other 
trade. It was the custom after the boys were about 14 or 15 years of age 
to let them go into the workshop for two or three hours a day to learn a 
trade, letting them spend the other two or three hours a day in the school- 
room. Now a sighted boy is expected to devote several years to learning a 
particular trade, and he is supposed to be at it all day long, and I think that 
a blind child should certainly devote quite as much time, and perhaps a little 
more time, to the acquisition of a trade. I think it is obvious that they could 
not have been thoroughly well tauglft under that system. I have known one 
or two of those who left the school at the same time as myself who have 
earned an indifferent livelihood, and in several instances those who had 
learnt tuning at the St. John's Wood school were afterwards sent to factories 
and of course have been able to earn a good living in consequence. There is 
a great deal of prejudice on the part of the public which induces them to 
refuse blind persons leave to compete for the position of organist. I think 
that if blind children were allowed to mix more freely with their seeing com- 
panions as they grow up that prejudice would be partly removed. Those 
who promote the institutions might do a great deal more towards obtaining 
employment for those who have left the institutions.. In many branches of 
industry many blind people, after having worked very hard all the week, are 
only able to earn a certain amount. We think that in such cases their earn- 
ings should certainly be supplemented. One of the causes of failure hitherto 
attending the efforts made to ameliorate the general condition of the blind 
has been the fact that the blind have not themselves been sufficiently con- 
sulted as to what is best for them. As far as my experience goes, tuning has 
proved to be the most remunerative occupation. 

John Stainer, Mus. Doc. — I see no reason why a blind man or woman 
should not be able to gain a livelihood from vocal or instrumental perform- 
ance, provided, of course, that he or she is possessed of a very high order of 
talent. As teachers the blind are under special disadvantages; it is a serious 
thing for a teacher not to be able to see the position of a child's hand when it 
is having a lesson on the pianoforte. In the keen competition amongst 
qualified seeing musicians, I think blind musicians stand but a poor chance 
of earning their bread. Their best chance would be as teachers of solo sing- 
ing, their quick ear would be of great value in teaching voice production. 
An enormous number of musicians get their living by playing in the orches- 
tras at theatres, but very few conductors would like to go to the extra trouble 
that a blind member of their orchestra would put them to. There are two 
occupations in connection with music for which the blind are well adapted, 
vile., pianoforte timing and pianoforte making. I sec nothing to prevent 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 363 



the blind following these occupations. I do not see why blind persons should 
not become excellent tuners, and I do not see why they should not take part 
in putting" pianofortes together. I do not think a blind person could very 
well undertake organ tuning; he would be heavily handicapped in com- 
parison with a seeing person; he would be likely to break his neck in going 
up and down ladders; one has to be half a monkey to look after an organ 
even under the most advantageous circumstances. I should say that the 
tuning work for which the blind are best adapted is that which is done in 
the pianoforte manufactories; in all the large manufactories they have tun- 
ers constantly at work getting pianos into tune that are intended for the 
show-rooms or that are going out on loan. A blind person could very well 
do the tuning at the manufactories, because if anything required to be 
mended it would be taken to another workman in the manufactory to be 
repaired ; but in the country the tuner has to mend broken pedals and mend 
broken hammers, and put fresh leather on the hammers where necessary. I 
daresay he could do it, but he would not be able to do it so easily as a seeing 
person. Mending a smashed hammer involves going about the house and 
getting a glue-pot. 

Sir George A. Macfarren, Mus. Doc. (blind) — With regard to the mat- 
ter of memory, and with regard to the matter of ear, I have often heard it 
said that persons in losing one sense quickened the others. I disbelieve that 
wholly. Any faculty that is greatly exercised of course is strengthened, 
whether it is the sense of taste, or the sense of sight, or the sense of smell; 
a person who makes it the business of his life to exercise that faculty acquires 
a sensibility that ordinary persons do not possess, but it is not through losing 
his sight that a man is able to hear or able to remember any better than 
others, but from the habit of trying to remember or listening carefully. I 
think it is a mistake to appropriate so very much of the lifetime of blind 
persons to working at industrial occupations, which tends to stiffen their 
faculties, physical and mental. I believe that a very large majority of blind 
persons are capable of mental exercise, and if they have the opportunity of 
good training they may do highly respectable intellectual work; and I have 
been sorry to find in the blind institutions I have visited that the average 
work is in mat-making and brush-making and such matters, and that the 
persons who work at those occupations are stolid, hard in their manner, and 
dull in their apprehension, whereas those who are taught music generally 
have far finer intelligence than their companions. On that account I believe 
that they might in the musical profession hold a very fair status, that is to 
say, if they all had the opportunity of developing what gifts they have re- 
ceived from nature. In an institution for the blind every pupil might be 
made to pass through some kind of probation to show his musical capabili- 
ties, and only {hose should be relegated to manual labor who proved decid- 
edly dull of intellect, and I believe they would be very few in proportion. 
I think the study of music not only improves the ear but improves the gen- 
eral intelligence; and it would be a means of happiness to them and enable 
them to give pleasure to others. I am quite sure that some blind persons 
have made very good choir masters and church organists. I have reason to 
know that blind persons can carry on the occupations of timing pianofortes 
and voicing harmoniums with complete success. 

James Hampton, founder of a home for the blind in Webber Row, 
South wark — So many poor, blind persons came to me asking if I could fur- 
nish them with a bed or give them enough money for a night's lodging, that 
I thought of starting this home. Numbers of the blind have no home and 
no friends. The blind school and the workshops are capital things for the 



364 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



blind, in their way, but when blind people come out of those institutions 
they have to return to their families, who are poor, and what they have 
learnt in the institutions is to a great extent thrown away; they have no 
opportunity to extend the knowledge they have acquired in those insitu- 
tions or to work at a trade that they may have been taught in them, and when 
they come out they find that they are a burden to their relatives, who turn 
them out on the streets. A young man, who was a splendid performer on the 
piano and the organ, could not get any pupils to enable him to earn his 
livelihood, and so he used to go into the park and lie there. His mother 
said if he did not work he should have no food, so I had him three years 
in the home. I could not get him any employment. Afterwards, as soon 
as his parents found that he could earn a good bit of money by playing the 
piano, they took him out of the home, and now he is at Brighton. He gets 
a guinea a night for playing at concerts. As regards mat-making, the blind 
cannot compete with the sighted, and the sighted cannot compete with the 
convict labor, because mats, the product of convict labor, are sold so very 
cheap. The basket trade is very much prejudiced by the importation of 
German baskets. You can buy a most beautiful basket in Tavistock street 
for a mere nothing, a basket which a blind man could not possibly make. 
I would suggest that the country should establish a home for the indigent 
blind, into which blind persons when they came out of these institutions 
could be taken, and where the knowledge which they had gained in those 
institutions could be extended and developed, instead of their going into the 
workhouse or going upon the streets. Blind people have a great dread of 
the workhouse, and their repugnance to the workhouse is quite justifiable, 
considering how they are treated there. I think their blindness is a sad 
affliction in itself without their being mixed with all classes. When they 
go into the workhouse they become mutes, because they are put in the com- 
pany of men who have not the feeling for the blind that they ought to have, 
and by aggravating them and one thing and the other they become com- 
pletely mutes. They keep themselves to themselves and become complete 
imbeciles. I do not mean by that that they become really speechless; they 
become stupid, by keeping silent; they become imbeciles. The best trade a 
blind person can learn is basket-making, because he can finish the job him- 
self. 

Tames A. Campbell — There is a strong prejudice against the employment 
of blind organists. There always must be .a residuum of blind persons who 
are unable to support themselves, who must depend on charity. As a rule 
those who have completed their education at Norwood College are able to 
gain their livelihood without any assistance. We have them so superintended 
that we endeavor to prevent their wasting time in any way; but we believe 
that the subsidies are necessary, on account of the men's inability to earn 
as much as is required for their support. 

A. W. G. Eanger, M.A., D.C.L. (blind) — I am practising as solicitor in 
London, with a staff of ten clerks. Lost my sight when I was 14 years of 
age. Do not know anyone who has gone through the same career as myself 
in my profession. Think the education of the blind should be in the direc- 
tion of the liberal professions. I would give a blind man or a blind girl as 
thorough an education as is possible, and then the blind person will himself 
or herself decide what line of life they will take up afterwards. A good 
education is of the same value to a blind man or girl as it is to a sighted 
one. When you are a little educated your ambition is aroused and you are 
capable of doing what you were not able to do before. I do not think that 
a blind man or girl should be directed in the first three parts of his or her 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 365 



education towards any particular thing. It is not so with sighted people, 
and I do not think it ought to be so with blind people. Blindness is alto- 
gether a much more severe visitation for a girl than it is for a man, and 
therefore the better her mind can be trained and stored the greater is the 
alleviation io her. I would rather see more money spent in the effort to 
train and educate girls thoroughly well than to educate and train men. I 
do not think the onus, so to speak, is on the advocate of advanced education 
for a blind girl to point out how she is thereby going to earn her living, as 
if in default of his being able to do so the conclusion were to be drawn that 
she will not be able to earn her living as the result of an advanced education. 
I think that a thoroughly educated blind girl herself would find out ways 
and means of getting her living. I think the mistake on the musical point 
is the too ready assumption that every blind man must of necessity be a 
musician, and that if he is not one he can be made one. 

F. J. Campbell — The blind as a class have less vitality than the seeing. 
Therefore every arrangement which we make is based upon the fact that we 
believe there is a necessity not only for gymnastic training, but for develop- 
ing the activity of the blind children; and we have lawns for them to play 
on, and games such as puss-in-the-corner, blind-man's-buff, and so on. I 
try to make those games a part of their education, and wherever I am I try 
to learn new games which I can teach to my blind children. Our first step 
is the healthy development of their bodies. One of the most difficult things 
is to overcome the awkward habits of the blind. Many of them learn almost 
from infancy a certain motion of the head or a habit of putting their fingers 
in their eyes. This requires almost constant attention. I do not say that 
there is not difficulty in getting employment. I do say that where a young 
lady or young gentleman has been refined and gentle in manner, where their 
appearance is as it should be, and is not objectionable, where they are pleas- 
ant and intelligent, and can converse agreeably, and are thoroughly pre- 
pared, I have never in a single instance failed to get employment for them. 
It is always a principle with me, when I take a holiday, whatever village 
I go into, to find out whether there is any possible chance of my 
placing there an organist or a pianoforte tuner or whatever it may 
be. I never wake up or go to sleep without having in my mind where I can 
find employment for my blind boys and girls. In some of the blind schools, 
where they have both workmen and children, and where the children are 
allowed io intermingle with the workmen, the children are often taught bad 
habits by the blind workmen; I know this to be so in a number of cases. I 
think if the Commission could make any recommendation to cause the sepa- 
ration of the work department and the educational department, we should do 
a great service to the young blind. Our playground has been planned so 
that there is a separate part for pupils of different ages. To make a good 
pianoforte tuner you must do very much more than teaching him simply 
to manage his tuning hammer. We specially make our pupils in the tech- 
nical school, that is tKe pianoforte tuners, give great attention to singing, 
and singing in the best way. I mean we teach them to discriminate between 
good and bad tones. Music without a very excellent training as a founda- 
tion, I mean general education and physical training, is almost worthless 
to the blind. Many schools have given too much time to the music without 
the general culture which is necessary to make music a success. Exercise 
with Indian clubs is one of the very best exercises for pianoforte players. 
Some of the blind must always depend upon handicrafts; handicrafts must 
always occupy an important place in the treatment of the blind, not only 
with the adult blind, there are certain young blind who will grow up and 



366 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



never be fit to cope with other things; and they should have mechanical 
training for their employment afterwards. I think if the young blind are 
well trained the large majority of them can do 'better than working at handi- 
crafts. I think it is of more importance to the blind than it is to the seeing 
to read out their exercises in school, for this reason, the sighted child in 
going along the street in every sign that it sees is learning how to spell; a 
Mind child has great difficulty in learning to spell, and if it uses writing a 
very great deal that to a certain extent makes up for its deficiency. As a 
rule, our people find employment We never lose our interest in any blind 
person that comes under our administration. If you would make the blind 
self-sustaining, you must lift them into a different atmosphere altogether. 
It is fatal to the blind if you educate them with the idea that they are a poor 
indigent class. The whole tone and feeling on the subject must change; 
and if you do not give them sufficient education and intelligence to bring 
them into relation with ordinary society your education of them is worth- 
less, and then they must go back to handicrafts only. I have one young man 
in Belfast who has gone into the coal business ; he is doing an excellent busi- 
ness. Two of our young men have a shop for selling pianos that they pay 
£330 a year for in Glasgow. We have several men in London who make a 
great deal of money by selling pianos, but what they do is to get the com- 
mission. One of our old pupils is farming. We have one remarkable instance 
of a sugar refiner who is managing a large business in Whitechapel. A 
number of my old pupils in America have gone into the book business. 

T. R. Armitage, M.D. — For a couple of years I spent several hours 
every day in visiting the blind of London at their own homes. I then found 
out that the blind, whether trained in institutions or untrained, had scarcely 
anything to do, that they were to a very great extent idle mendicants, that 
in fact they were not earning their own living. On inquiry we found that 
a very small proportion of the former pupils in institutions of the United 
Kingdom who had been trained in music were able to succeed as musicians. 
I went over to Paris and investigated the question very carefully there, and 
I came to the conclusion that the education of the blind as musicians in Paris 
was infinitely superior to anything that we had in England. That conviction 
resulted in the foundation of the Normal College. The main object of the 
college is to train musicians to make the blind self-supporting in the pro- 
fession of music, but it is impossible to do that without giving them also a 
thoroughly good general education. It is necessary to train a great many of 
the blind in manual trades, or in professions not musical. If we trained all 
the blind as musicians, we should overstock the profession, and there would 
be no work for them to do. It would be better for us to lay down in general 
terms that the education of the blind ought to begin with the Kindergarten 
with object lessons, and should go on with reading, writing, arithmetic and 
geography, according to the best methods, and that the blind children should 
receive the same kind of good elementary education that seeing children 
receive. The success in life of the pupil depends on a great many circum- 
stances that cannot be tested by examination. One very essential point is the 
moral condition of the pupils, which is brought about by the moral discipline 
of the school. Then the physical training of the pupils is a most important 
factor in the question whether they become self-supporting in after life. If the 
blind are turned out weakly they cannot succeed. We may say what we like, 
but the struggle in competition with the seeing is so keen in every branch 
that a blind man can take up, that unless he is fully equipped for the struggle 
he cannot succeed. The system which in Germany (Saxony only) goes by 
the name of "fuersorge" was introduced in Dresden about fifty years ago; 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 367 



it has been slowly developed, and it consists mainly in the institution keep- 
ing touch with all its former pupils. A register is kept, there being a 
pigeon-hole for each pupil, and the papers relating to that pupil from the 
time of his first entering the school up to his death are kept all together, so 
that whenever any question arises about a particular pupil the director sim- 
ply has to refer to his dossier and finds everything recorded about him, the 
grants he has received, his conduct in the school, and everything else that 
ran be possibly wanted to form a judgment. Then these former pupils are 
looked after by a society, of which the director of the institution is always 
the president, which administers a fund for former pupils. The fund for 
former pupils has been gradually accumulating for the last fifty years by 
subscriptions, and by the sale of the work of the pupils while in the institu- 
tion, that is their subscription to the fund, and it now amounts to about 
£1,500 a year. Ex-pupils are furnished with outfits and established in busi- 
ness. Then the director before establishing the pupil looks out for some re- 
spectable and influential man in the village who will become a sort of god- 
father to the blind man to look after him, give him advice whenever he re- 
quires it, help him to get orders, and keep the institution informed as to his 
circumstances, and as to his conduct. The pupil is also expected to write 
to the institution at stated times — several times during the year — saying 
how he is getting on and giving full particulars about himself. Then as long 
as the pupils conduct themselves properly, and do not receive parish assist- 
ance, or do not beg in the streets, or do anything else that is disreputable, 
they are sure to be assisted from the fund to whatever extent is absolutely 
necessary. The difficulty of making the blind self-supporting is so infinitely 
greater than in the case of the seeing that you ought to offer special advant- 
ages in the case of the blind. As a general rule, the old and infirm are much 
better looked after by being allowed to live at home, receiving a pension, than 
by being congregated in an asylum. The difficulties with regard to the deaf 
and dumb are entirely different from those that we have to contend with 
with regard to the blind. I understand from the evidence which we have 
had before us from gentlemen who have a knowledge of the subject that 
there is not at all the same difficulty in finding work for the deaf and dumb 
after, leaving institutions, provided they have been properly trained, that 
there is in finding work for the blind; with the blind the great difficulty 
begins after they have left the school and are launched upon the world; 
with the deaf and dumb the great difficulty is the training in the institution ; 
therefore I think the two classes stand on a different footing in that respect. 
Norwood is not a school for teaching basket-making and mat-making. The 
blind tuners, in order to be successful, must as a rule be better workmen 
with a better knowledge of music than their seeing competitors. 

W. H. Cummings — The blind should begin to learn to sing young; as 
soon as possible; just as soon as they begin to learn to read. Not only their 
character, but also their very faces, improve under the training. The preju- 
dice against the blind was very strong a few years ago, and advertisements 
used to be inserted in the musical papers when an organist was required : 
"No blind men need apply." 

Anthony Buckle — I strongly urge, where it is possible and where there 
is any likelihood at all of success, letting the pupils leave the institution 
and go to their own homes and work there, in preference to congregating 
them together in large institutions; but at the same time I am strongly of 
opinion tnat there are a large number of blind who come from small villages 
who are dull fingered, and perhaps somewhat dull in intellect, for whom you 
must and ought to provide large workshops. I think that is one of the needs 



368 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 369 



of the present day, a larger number of large workshops in towns. We have 
some basket makers who can earn £1 a week; we have some inferior ones 
who will earn perhaps 10s. We find the dull fingered boys, and boys of dull 
intellect, never suceed with baskets ; we are obliged to put them to brush- 
making. Baskets cannot be made by machinery; they are making brushes 
now by machinery, I am sorry to say. Not more than 25 per cent, of the 
pupils are suited to learn music. The other 75 per cent, are more or less 
suited to learn handicrafts. But I ought to say with regard to the latter, 
you have always a certain number that from weak physical health or from 
weak intellect will never be able to earn the whole of their livlihood. 

H. L. Hall — Within the last two years they have concluded to take only 
young people at the Philadelphia Institution for the Blind; there are still 
some adults at the Institution, but they are gradually shutting their doors 
to them. In Pennsylvania the schools have taught brush-making up to last 
year, but they have abandoned it as worthless; they taught mat-making for 
many years, perhaps forty years, and they abandoned that as worthless. 
They now teach broom-making, carpet-weaving, cane-seating, and mattress- 
making. These are the trades which they teach the boys. The girls are 
taught bead-work, knitting, crocheting, and hand and machine sewing. I 
should prefer not to teach brush-making, because it does not pay at all. I 
never put forward the work produced by the blind as being blind work at 
all. I sell it upon its own merits. In my opinion a blind industrial insti- 
tution can never be self-sustaining on general principles, because we have to 
compete not only with skilled sighted labor, but with all sorts of steam 
machinery. I believe that a very large proportion of blind people, if they 
earn their living at all, must do it by some handicraft. I have never had 
any success with any blind person that I found begging; they seem to prefer 
begging; they seem to have lost their manhood. I cannot get anything out 
of them, I cannot make them work. I have very frequently had to dismiss 
men for bad conduct or hopeless indolence or idleness. Two mattress-makers 
will do all the custom work that I can get in our big city, and will not be 
employed all the time. I asked the New York Institution why they recom- 
mended that the blind should be employed in cane-seating, knowing as I did 
that it was not profitable, and the answer I received was that they recom- 
mended it as a means of education. I know that in the largest concern in 
Baltimore their trade has been solicited this year at 3 cents per chair; that 
is to say, an ordinary dining-room chair, and I have never yet known a blind 
man that could cane over three a day, and that would be 9 cents of our 
money. I am speaking of new work. In my judgment, there should be two 
institutions, one purely educational, which should take blind children under 
a certain age, the other purely industrial, which should take all others of 
suitable age. One man may be able to earn his living at 60, while another 
may be entirely used up at 40. If a man does not succeed in handicraft after 
he has left the institution, it is not so much the fault of the institution. It 
would be utterly impossible for any man, blind or sighted, to set up and 
carry on successfully, and without money, without friends and without 
credit, a broom business or. any other business against a large establishment 
like mine, or against the other large concerns in Philadelphia. The want of 
success is not due to the institution. 

James McCormick — The blind cannot get a living at music. I may say 
that the blind do not like to work with seeing people in workshops; they 
prefer working by themselves. The blind cannot compete with the seeing 
world. A great many basket-makers will not employ them, and under the 
trades union laws seeing workmen will not work in the ' shops with them ■ 

24 ED. 



370 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



then if they get work they cannot do it at home. In my experience it is. 
better not to put a child to industrial training too early, but to treat a child 
as a child as long as he is a child, and then when he becomes a man put 
him to work; they make better scholars by not being put to work too early, 
and the better scholars they are the better men they are in the workshop. 

THE EDINBURGH CONFERENCE, 1905. 

It may be objected that the evidence above quoted was taken nearly a 
score of years ago, and that conditions have so changed in the interval that 
the facts and statements are no longer applicable. There was an Interna- 
tional Conference on the Blind held at Edinburgh last year (1905), attended 
by delegates from the United Kingdom, the United States, Europe, Aus- 
tralia, and South Africa. From the minutes of that Conference I have taken 
the following extracts : — 

Colin Macdonald, Manager Institution for the Blind, Dundee — The 
problem of the employment of the blind is admittedly difficult — employment 
which will at once be a satisfactory solace and mitigant of the unfortunate 
position of the class, and provide work and earnings sufficient to maintain 
them in a degree of comfort and independence. . . . The employment prob- 
lem still remains. To its solution the most intelligent, and practical experts 
have brought their knowledge and experience, but as yet no solvent has been 
found. It is claimed by some that the solution lies along the line of educa- 
tion and training. Certainly when blind persons have had the advantages 
of a thoroughly sound education in any of our highly equipped educational 
institutions, and an industrial training suited to their individual capacity, 
the highest results may be obtained, but all education and training which 
does not put its subjects in a position in which these will find their fullest 
development in useful employment, fitted to procure the means of susten- 
ance, must be regarded as to a great extent not fulfilling its primary purpose. 
... It has been amply demonstrated that, unless in exceptional cases, if the 
trade rates only are paid to blind workers for their products, absolute starv- 
ation would often result. I think our blind wage-earners, who are fighting 
life's battle so heavily handicapped, deserve State recognition and assistance. 
... It is well known that the earnings of the blind, reckoned on the scale 
by which the ordinary artizan is paid, rarely yield a living wage; indeed, 
his unaided product has often to be sold at a loss. It is reckoned that in 
many cases 25 to 50 per cent, in excess of trade rates has to be paid to enable 
the workers to frank their weekly maintenance bill — hence the necessity for 
a special fund to regularly supply the needful assistance. The difficulty of 
finding new departments is accentuated by the fact that departments which 
were at one time regarded as pre-eminently fitted for the blind have now, 
through the changed conditions of labor, the widespread use of machinery, 
and other causes, become merely a means for filling up time, leaving the 
question of profit and even cost price out of the question. Added to this, 
there is the foreign competition, in brushes and baskets particularly, which 
has threatened the extinction of our home trade in those classes of baskets 
which the blind are found to do best and at which they can earn the highest 
wages. By way of remedying the adverse influence of the introduction of 
machinery and foreign competition in employments suitable for the blind, 
it is generally admitted that sighted labor should be more largely utilized. 
By this means more advanced work could be undertaken, the blind operatives 
being employed on that part of the work they can most quickly make and 
yield them the best return, whilst- the whole would be finished by a 



J906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 371 



sighted artizan. What applies to the more advanced basket work is equally 
applicable to furniture stuffing and upholstering generally. 

The primary education of the blind should include play. A large pro- 
portion of the ailments of blind children arise from want of active exercise, 
and well-directed play can do a great deal to alter this. Outdoor games are, 
of course, preferable, but not always possible. To provide for these it is 
essential that the grounds and playgrounds set apart for the chil- 
dren should be large and open. Large open playsheds should be 
provided for use in wet weather. An essential to the success of games 
(outdoor and indoor) is that the teachers interest themselves in their pupils' 
play, and closely supervise it. Mr. Illingworth writes: "There is nothing 
to my mind so beneficial or so much enjoyed by children and adults as a 
running path. Blind children absolutely lose the slouching gait and hesita- 
tion in stepping out after a few weeks' practice on the running path, properly 
constructed. There is competition here, and that is what is needed in blind 
recreation to make it attractive and interesting." 

It must suffice here for me to say that the institution's work is not half 
done when a pupil leaves its doors at the completion of his training. Whether 
this matter be referred to as the Saxon system, After-Care, the Care System, 
or any other title, the principle involved is precisely the same. 

Mr. W. H. Illingsworth, Manchester — I feel I cannot press too strongly 
the necessity for separating the young children from the older children and 
adults. I would like further to mention the very great value I found in bead 
work. Anyone who tries it will find that adults as well as children will learn 
the Braille very much more quickly if at the same time they take up the 
bead work and make up little objects in bead and wire. 

Dr. F. J. Campbell, London — All my sighted teachers can teach Braille. 
When I get applications from teachers, and they say that they can teach 
the blind, I answer that I want a teacher who has natural aptitude and en- 
thusiasm for teaching, and in a short time the information required for the 
special methods used in schools for the blind can be given to them. The 
children can be trained to become neat, active, and self-dependent. Many 
children when they enter school cannot dress or feed themselves. Great at- 
tention should be paid to the games and sports of the children. We take 
the children on a great many expeditions to the woods and fields, where they 
can gather wild flowers. They not only enjoy these expeditions, but gain 
much useful information. 

Mr. A. B. Norwood, York — It would be well if institutions for the blind 
would take steps to interest the teachers and students of the training colleges 
and teaching centres in our cities and towns in the methods and appliances 
used in teaching the blind. The benefit would be two-fold. It might happen 
that some students would become so interested in the work as to determine 
to find their vocation in the education of the blind, and so lessen the diffi- 
culty which now exists in finding teachers for some schools; and, secondly, 
in the course of a short time teachers in ordinary schools would be able to 
deal more intelligently with the cases of defective sight which come so fre- 
quently under their notice. 

Henry Stainsby, Birmingham — The higher education of the blind should 
be interpreted to include instruction in any profession, trade or handicraft, 
which may ultimately be used by the blind as a means of livelihood. 

The higher education of the blind is not (except in a few instances) 
synonymous with the higher education of the seeing. Take an illustration : 
a young man, but for his blindness, has in him the making of a thoroughly 



372 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



able draughtsman and mechanical engineer; on account of his lack of sight 
he has to fall l)ack on some handicraft — say, basket-making. The higher 
education of this person, which should have taken the form of instruction 
in draughtsmanship and engineering, must now take the lower form of 
tuition in basket-making, but should be still classed as higher education. I 
am fully aware that there are some blind persons who can benefit by higher 
education strictly so-called, and become solicitors, ministers of religion, 
teachers, etc., but these compared with the vast majority of the blind only 
make them rare exceptions. 

Mr. Tate — The subjects taught should include mathematics, literature, 
history, psychology, and such studies as tend to promote a well-balanced 
judgment and an energetic and powerful will. Those persons who are in- 
tended for any special career, as music, should also receive such a course of 
training and general culture as shall not only render th,eir society agreeable 
and attractive, but enable them to fulfil their particular vocations with 
greater ease, acceptance and efficiency. 

Music should be taught to all the blind who have taste, intelligence and 
a desire to learn. It is a matter of no little surprise to me that the violin, 
flute, 'cello, and other portable instruments are not regularly taught in all 
blind institutions. Even though such instruments might not be the direct 
means of bringing in a living to those who learn to play them moderately 
well, they would certainly be the means of employing delightfully and pro- 
fitably many an o.herwise dull and dreary hour, and also of giving pleasure 
to others. 

I know full well the stock of old wifish arguments regularly trotted out by 
numerous grandmotherly good people of both sexes, on institution boards and 
off. They say "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, and to teach a blind 
boy the cornet or ihe violin is tantamount to setting him up as a street and 
public house entertainer, therefore do not put such a dangerous instrument 
into his hands." Oh, *those unco guid folk. To be strictly logical — which, 
by the way, such folk seldom are — they should not teach a blind boy to read 
Moon or Braille, lest by any chance he might make this knowledge of the 
raised characters a medium for bringing in the coppers from passers-by at 
the street corners. 

We teach our sighted boys and girls to play all kinds of instruments 
purely for the sake of pleasure, not profit — that is to say, pecuniary profit. 
Why should we deny to our blind what we willingly give to those who have 
already so many pleasures? 

In the higher education of the blind, let the trade or profession in view 
be what it may, strict business habits should be most carefully inculcated 
and enforced, and these, in addition to a good technical training, coupled 
with a knowledge of social requirements and usages, a smart and tidy appear- 
ance, and polite bearing, will enable an intelligent blind man or woman to 
go out into the world with confidence. 

Mrs. MacNicol, London — I feel it a great honor and pleasure to have 
been appointed by the Committee of the Institute for Massage by the Blind 
to speak at an International Conference on the subject. The first great essen- 
tial in any work to ensure lasting success is to do it well. This is now proved 
beyond all doubt as regards the blind in the work of massage. They do it 
well. As there is an ever-increasing demand for what is well done in every 
profession, it must clearly be to the public advantage to employ the blind 
as masseurs and masseuses. Our operators are carefully selected as to 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 373 



health and fitness. They are taught in the same classes with the sighted. 
They hold the highest certificate of efficiency in massage that can be ob- 
tained in London before we ask the public to employ them. They have 
also, in a very marked degree, the natural qualifications for this work — 
delicacy of touch, power of thought concentration, magnetic influence, 
and, best of all, gentle sympathy, and the desire to do their best. Our 
society is only a few years old, and we have now 21 masseuses and 15 mas- 
seurs on our list, taken from various positions in life. Some are engaged 
in hydropathic establishments and some in private practice, and I have 
heard nothing but the greatest satisfaction expressed by those who employ 
them. While to us the thought is comparatively new, Japan has assigned 
this work of massage to the blind from time immemorial. But what con- 
cerns us most is, naturally, those who are nearest us. The blind, however 
painstaking and efficient they may be, cannot make a market for them- 
selves, nor press their needs, and we who are interested in them know that 
machinery and other causes have closed many occupations against them 
in recent years. Christianity from the beginning has taught us to give the 
blind a foremost place as those we ought to help. They have very inde- 
pendent spirits and great courage, and we owe much to their example in 
this. The work of massage is a step towards independence. It is remun- 
erative, and gives the operators variety of thought and bodily exercise. 
Let us help the blind to do a fair share of it, since, as I said before, they 
do it well. 

Rev. Philip Bainbridge, London — One of our best industries used 
to be heavy baskets for house-builders and for sanitary purposes. Now, in 
London, the use of those baskets has gone off almost completely, as the sani- 
tary authorities insist on galvanized iron. Another point is fresh employment 
for the blind. A shop assistant in Harrod's Stores fell blind. The 
manager found him a place as weigher of dried goods — sugar and 
rice — which he put in bags. He has held that place for two 
and a half years, and the manager tells me that they will be glad to answer 
any questions regarding him. Can more openings of this sort be found for 
blind people? No doubt it saves expense in cost of management to have 
large institutions, but I do hope that the idea of preserving the home life 
will always be kept in mind. With every institution there should be a cer- 
tain amount of possibility that the blind may be able to live outside in their 
own homes, and not necessarily in institutions. 

Mr. T. Taylor, Liverpool — I think, in regard to this question of work, 
that blind boys and girls, when admitted to a school for the blind, ought 
to be trained like sighted boys and girls, and go to work at least half time 
when they are fourteen years of age. The blind ought to be taught the work 
most suitable for the district they intend to reside in when they leave school. 
Instrumental music ought to be taught, but only to a few. I am pleased to 
say that I heard a short time ago from one of our former pupils that he was 
earning £150 a year as a teacher of music. Piano-tuning and repairing 
should also be taught; some of our old pupils are doing well in this branch. 
Some are taught basket-making and mat-making, but to my mind shoe-mak- 
ing is the best trade, and one of the most profitable to teach, and I am glad 
to say that it has been adopted at this school, and the results have far ex- 
ceeded the expectations of the committee. This industry may be carried on 
in the workers' own homes with advantage. Our object ought to be to make 
business men of our pupils. I have one or two former pupils in the oil busi- 
ness, one of whom is doing very well, and has been able to purchase the 
house he resides in and the one next door. I would suggest that young 



374 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



men who have not the ability to be taught a trade should, in towns, follow 
the shoe-blacking trade, which would be suitable and profitable. With re- 
gard to female labor, I think that Mr. Pine and Mr. Stainsby are setting us 
a very good example in the way of typewriting, basket-making, massage and 
weaving. I have introduced flower-making, for those who formerly had 
sight, with success, and, so far, it has proved to be a pleasant and useful 
occupation for young women. 

Rev. H. T. G. Kingdon, Bristol — I think we want more trades for the 
women, who seem to have been to a large extent neglected until the last few 
years. They cannot earn very large wages at any of the trades we are 
teaching them at present. The stocking machine has been introduced with 
good results. We assist our girls as far as we can, and are aiming to make 
it possible for them to earn 6s. to 8s. a week, which is, I suppose, equal to 
what is earned by many sighted workers. 

Mr. W. H. Dixson, Oxford — We have so often heard that a blind man 
cannot do this or that as well as a sighted man, that it is quite a relief to 
find something that the average blind man can do better than the average 
sighted man — and that something is piano-tuning. The average sighted 
piano tuner gets a very second-rate training. He goes into a small music 
shop and picks up a few tricks of the trade. You go to the shop and ask to 
have your piano tuned. By a remarkable stroke of business, you will find 
your piano tuned in half an hour. Now, no piano can be tuned in half an 
hour. The average blind tuner knows that, and he takes more than half an 
hour. I therefore make it my business to tell every one of my sighted friends 
that if they employ a blind tuner who has a certificate from a good place 
they will do better than if they employ an average sighted man. Again, it 
is not merely prejudice that blind men have to face, but the anxiety to make 
as much money out of that prejudice as possible. 

Dr. Campbell, London — I hope that Mr. Macdonald will move a resolu- 
tion to the effect that no blind tuners shall be sent out until they have passed 
a thorough examination and obtained a certificate. Tuning is one of the 
best employments for the blind, but if we send out tuners that are not thor- 
oughly trained they will soon spoil the work for those who are capable. Mr. 
George Rose, our examiner, says that increased skill and competency are de- 
manded from the sighted tuners, and that we must bring the work of the 
blind up to the same standard if we expect them to obtain employment. A 
superficial knowledge of tuning may be readily acquired by the blind, but a 
long course of careful training is essential to success. If a sighted man does 
a piece of work badly, it does not prevent another seeing man from getting 
employment. But if a blind man attempts to tune or repair a piano and 
fails, it is impossible for another blind man to get work in that vicinity. 

Mr. J. E. Gregory, London — We know that there are numbers of blind 
persons who have been trained, and have become expert in various branches 
of industry, but, in spite of their training, they cannot find employment, for 
the simple reason that the institutions which are in existence at present are 
not sufficient to offer employment for all. That is very largely the reason 
why we see so many blind people exhibiting their infirmities in the streets, 
playing musical instruments and doing other things. I do not agree with the 
gentleman who spoke yesterday, and assumed that those who played musical 
instruments on the streets were those who had been trained for the musical 
profession. As a matter of fact, I know several cases of men who have been 
trained as basket-makers and as brush-makers who are playing musical in- 
struments on the streets and in public houses, for the simple reason that 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 375 



they cannot get basket or brush work. How is this difficulty to be met? 
There are many new industries that could be opened up to the blind. The 
only way to find new industries is by making experiments. Experiments 
are expensive, and they should be carried out and paid for from funds pro- 
vided by the Government. 

Mr. Alric Lundberg, Stockholm — It is generally acknowledged that our 
chief object when trying to ameliorate the condition of the blind is to widen, 
as far as possible, the spheres of their activity. Every new trade, every new 
profession, added to those we have in existence, is a victory won in the cause 
of the blind, tending to encourage further efforts in the same direction. It 
is on that ground that I beg to draw your attention to a new trade, namely, 
the trade of cigar making by the blind, which has been carried on in Holland 
with success for some time. Let me give you the chief features, according 
to the statements made by the president of the Dutch Training Association 
in the Hague: (1) This work is generally remunerative; (2) it can easily 
be done by sightless persons; (3) it is suitable both to men and women; 
(4) it may be carried on at home as well as in special premises; (5) it is 
necessary that one, and only one, sighted person should be engaged at the 
work-place to examine and classify the tobacco used for the cigars ; (6) it 
is well to choose young blind men or women for experiments in cigar- 
making as a trade for the blind, as this handicraft demands a swift hand 
and a delicate touch; (7) the teacher chosen for the purpose might be 
chosen from the ordinary workmen at the cigar factory; he should, of 
course, be skilful in his work, and take an interest in his task as a teacher; 
(8) in Holland the teacher's salary amounts to 8 francs a week; (9) it has 
been found that one year is sufficient for a blind person to become a clever 
cigarmaker if he devotes two or three hours daily to the work. For my 
own part, I am certain that this trade will in time turn out to be a good 
and remunerative employment within reach of the blind. 

Mr. A. Siddall, Rochdale — I believe there are more trades to be found 
for the blind, and it is our duty to seek them. It was such thoughts that 
caused me to take up the boot and shoe work. Some time ago, through the 
assistance of the Gardner Trust and the society I represent, I was enabled 
to go to Denmark to bring over the boot and shoe work to this country. I 
believe that if this trade is given a fair trial it will prove most successful 
for the blind. Its everyday demand is one of the great points in its favor, 
and it is quite possible for most blind people to do it with the assistance of 
the special tools, of which I have now copies. After four months I re- 
turned, making my own boots, though my teacher and I were ignorant of 
each other's language. Now, I do not suggest that the blind should take 
up this trade as shoemakers; I only suggest that repairs should be done 
by blind people; but in order that the work should be efficiently carried 
out I should suggest that every blind man, before being allowed to repair, 
should be compelled to make a pair of boots. By doing so, I find that my 
people are made sure of producing good work. I have two men who are 
now repairing for the public. I find that they are making quite a respect- 
able wage out of it. I have one fellow who is repairing three or four pairs 
in a day. I think this trade is worth trying, and I. only hope that those 
who take it up will give it a fair trial, or leave it alone. If a man is fully 
occupied, I think that he will make three shillings or four shillings a day 
of clear profit. 

Mr. Ben. Purse, Manchester — In the vast proportion of cases you will 
find that the wages received by blind workers in this country are miserably 
insufficient to properly sustain the lives of those who are so working. I 



376 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



do not attribute this to the negligence or the indifference of the managers 
of institutions or those connected with institutions. If you want evidences 
of the lack of employment you have only to study closely the census re- 
turns. The city of Manchester has a blind population of 472. Taking 
those employed in our local institution and those in various occupations 
outside that particular institution, we have not more than 90 who are em- 
ployed, while in our local union we have more than 90 blind persons. We 
have 62 of our people forced on to the streets to gain a livelihood as street 
musicians, hawkers, etc. This is a pitiable state of affairs, and it is high 
time for the municipalities or the State to come to the aid of philanthropy. 

Mr. J. C. Warren, Nottingham — We are all agreed with what has been 
said as to the necessity for new trades for the blind, and particularly for blind 
women. I was very glad to hear about cigarmaking, but the difficulty seems 
to be that we cannot carry on a trade of that kind in our institutions for a 
long time to come. We shall have to induce cigarmakers in our towns to take 
blind women into their works. As another means of giving employment to 
blind women, we have introduced Swedish hand-loom weaving into our Not- 
tingham institution, and so far with satisfactory results. I hope that we shall 
soon see Harris tweeds made by the blind on these looms, and, if this can be 
effected, there ought to be a regular market for them. Some years ago we at 
Nottingham gave up the children's part of our institution altogether, and 
devoted ourselves entirely to technical education. When our pupils have 
become competent, we either employ them in our own workshops or send them 
to their homes, and look after them under the Saxon system. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Selfe, London — Speaking at the annual meeting of our 
society, Mr. Gladstone said: " Employment to the Mind is the condition of 
mental serenity, of resignation, and of contentment. Employment to the 
blind is also the condition of subsistence; that is, of honorable and independ- 
ent subsistence." These last words are the crux of the question. We have 
men in our own workshops earning 30s. to 35s. a week. In that same insti- 
tution we have a mat-maker. We asked one of the best known mat manufac- 
turers in England the trade price per foot for the kind of work that our man 
does, the answer was a penny per square foot. Applying that rate of wage 
to our mat-maker, he would only earn 4s. 6d. a week. It is not to be sup- 
posed that any one imagines that even a single man can live on 4s. 6d. a 
week. I am happy to say that we give our man 18s. I would strongly urge 
the appointment of a committee of experts to consider this question of the 
employment of the blind, and to put some definite proposals before the 
blind world in general. 

Mr. W. H. Dixson, Oxford — I believe that there is a general impression 
that in Japan massage is a monopoly of the blind. It was so until Western 
civilization was introduced, and now it has ceased to be so. 

Mr. M. Priestly, Bradford — The better employment of the blind is a sub- 
ject to which I have devoted much time and careful consideration for some 
years, and I have come to the conclusion that the greatest problem in connec- 
tion with the whole subject is to provide the difference between the actual 
value of the blind labor and the price paid for such labor. With proper 
supervision we need have no fear about the quality of work done by the blind. 
A look round our exhibition will be convincing proof pi this statement. It 
is, of course, in the quantity of work produced in a given time where blind 
labor suffers most. When employed on piece work, the blind must be paid 
at a higher rate of wages than that paid to sighted persons. In my own case, 
work in connection with Government and railway contracts has been de- 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 377 



clined; not because we could not do it, but because the loss was too much. In 
negotiating orders it is strictly business, and rightly so. In making the goods 
it is largely charity, and, so long as blind people have to compete with those 
who can see, charity must enter into it in one way or another. It is useless 
to attempt to obtain higher prices for goods made by the blind than the prices 
charged by our competitors. A grant of £10 per head for each blind person 
regularly employed would soon place the institutions in a position to increase 
the number of workers. 

Mr. M. G. Mackenzie, Inverness — We have successfully carried on the 
"Saxon system" in our large district. When a trade or occupation is ac- 
quired by any of the pupils trained in our institution at Inverness, on their 
return home every encouragement is given them to begin work on their own 
account, and the project has been most satisfactory. Material at cost price 
is supplied them till they are fully established. 

Mr. J. Frew Bryden, Glasgow — We may sret rid of sentiment h^re nnd 
face the fact that work among the blind cannot be carried on by any institu- 
tion unless at a loss, which must be made up either from charitable sources 
or from the State. We heard to-day of a case of a man in an institution, 
whose work was only worth 4s. 6d., and yet he was paid 18s. a week. I think 
it would be possible to devise some form of unskilled employment that would 
fetch more than 4s. 6d., and this could be supplemented to some extent. 
Surely this would be better than the alternatives of the street or the poor- 
house. With regard to work among women, we in Glasgow provide for 
nearly 140 women knitting in their own homes. These women get what is 
equal to 3s. a week. 

Mr. Collingwood, Exeter — I should like to say a word or two on piano 
tuning. In the majority of institutions basket-making, mat-making and 
brush-making are the main source of their income, and piano tuning is 
merely a subsidiary matter. Now, should you put the same push into that 
as into the other trades, I think you will find that it will form a very good 
source of income. I am not going to ask where you buy your socks, but 1 
feel tempted to ask, "How many members of committees of blind institutions 
have their pianos tuned by blind tuners?" 

The following extracts are taken from a paper presented to the Edin- 
burgh conference by Mr. Henry J. Wilson, Secretary of Gardner's Trust 
for the Blind, London: — For defective blind children no provision has yet 
been made. Their number is comparatively few, and they are scattered. 
Whether the child is defective mentally or physically, it demands a greater 
amount of individual attention than a child of normal physique and intel- 
lect, and, to that extent, of course, there is an undue demand on the time 
and energies of the teacher. The younger children (normal ones) are very 
imitative, and soon acquire the peculiarities of the defectives. Unless the 
defect is quite apparent the child should have a reasonable trial among 
other children. That the child is backward is often due to the early train- 
ing, or rather want of training. This may be the result of simple neglect 
or want of interest on the part of parents, or mistaken sense of kindness 
shown by doing too much for the child, instead of teaching him to help him- 
self. A judicious course of physical and manual training, rather than 
mental work, should, in the first instance, be the chief feature of the cur- 
riculum. The main cause of the prevalence of defective children is the 
utter ignorance of mothers relative to the feeding, clothing and care of 
children. The leading characteristics of the feeble-minded are those of 
fear, together with a deep cunning, and ai} abhorrence / of noise. They are 



378 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



very susceptible to the influence of kindness. There is a class of blind 
children — muscularly feeble — whom we cannot reckon as physically defec- 
tive, but who have so little use of their fingers as to make hand-work a 
matter of extreme difficulty. They are mentally sound, and their case is, 
therefore, all the more piteous and difficult to deal with. As a rule, the 
"defective" blind are afflicted in one way or other, or in several, of the fol- 
lowing ways : — Slow in perception, lacking in truthfulness and reasoning and 
muscular power, of strong immoral tendencies, of unclean habits, peculiar- 
ity of speech and indistinctness in articulation, destructive, extremely ac- 
tive or extremely inactive, weak in will power and prone to uncontrollable 
fits of temper, stubborn, and requiring coaxing, feeble and slouching in 
gait, quaint movements of head and body, slow circulation, cold, clammy 
hands, but, generally speaking, they are of an affectionate disposition. It 
is difficult to draw an exact line and to say who are mentally defective, as 
the limits are still undefined, ranging, as they do, from the ordinary stupid 
person to idiocy, the former being probably a fit subject for an ordinary 
school, and the latter for an asylum. Much care should be exercised before 
children are removed as defectives from the ordinary school. A good many 
defective blind children have come to me in the course of my experience, 
who, if they had been treated by their parents in the same manner as other 
children, if they had been given ordinary exercise and little duties to per- 
form, would not have been defective either mentally or physically. You all 
know that a blind child is very often left the whole day long sitting in a 
corner, and I can cite cases where a child has actually been kept in bed most 
of its life till it was ten or eleven years of age to keep it out of harm's 
way. That child is bound to be mentally and physically defective. I should 
like to mention one of the things I found of the greatest use at West Craig- 
millar in remedying physical and, I believe, mental defects — those peculiar 
movements, twitching of hands and face, so common to the blind. Try 
the experiment of making the blind child lie down on a flat back board 
for half an hour each day, or twenty minutes twice a day. It has a very 
remarkable effect, and quickly eradicates not only a tendency to spinal 
curvature, but many habits of twitching, swaying and the like. Very 
few parents can be convinced that their children are mentally defective. 

GIVING THE BLIND A START. 

Forty-eight years ago the first society in Scotland for dealing with 
and teaching the blind to read in their own homes was formed in Edin- 
burgh. Ten societies, or missions, so distributed as to practically cover the 
whole country, are formed into a union called the "Scottish Outdoor Blind 
Teachers' Union." The societies in Scotland have never started workshops 
on their own account. They have always felt that workshop employment 
was the function of the institutions and asylums, and have tried to do their 
part in securing employment on other lines. The risk to employers under 
Workmen's Liability and Compensation Acts is making it increasingly 
difficult to find any employment, and yet the variety of situations which 
are secured is somewhat remarkable. Among the men we find missionaries, 
commercial travellers, stair lamplighters, night watchmen, straw-rope 
makers, bolt and nut cleaners, bottle washers and laborers. Among the 
women we find a factory worker, a hair-teazer, a pirn-winder, and a soloist 
in the Salvation Army. It will be seen from our statistics that the largest 
proportion of men we are brought into contact with lose their sight near 



190b EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 379 



or after middle age. The experience of our Societies has shown that in 
such cases, if the general health of the applicant is good, and there is a 
reasonable amount of capacity, help to begin some simple form of trading 
is the best way in which assistance can be given. Where a sufficient amount 
of energy and perseverance is forthcoming the results are generally quite 
encouraging. Some judgment must be shown in selecting cases for this 
kind of help. Even among the most likely it has all the risks of an ex- 
periment. The forms of trading most generally engaged in are smallwares, 
tea, and drapery goods. These are the most easily started, and bring in an 
immediate return, which additional experience and assiduity make an in- 
creasing one. The varieties of occupations engaged in are often suggested 
by some experience before they lost their sight, and in other cases by the 
individuality of the trader himself. We have traders in coal and firewood, 
fish, fruit and earthenware; some trundle the lowly barrow, while others 
aspire to the dignity of a pony and cart. Some have to secure and pay 
for guides; others, more favored, have active wives or members of their 
families, whose help and co-operation greatly facilitate their busijn;e|ss. 
Among the forms in which others are engaged we have cutlery, saw-dust, 
books, oil, photographs, and other articles. I could give selected cases 
from among those whom we have helped who are now reaping large in- 
comes, and some who have retired with a competence. We have at present 
190 traders on our roll who are carrying on trading as the result of grants 
received from our Society. Grants are given according to the special 
need from £2 to £10. Last year the sum of £207 was expended in this way. 
In a number of cases help has been repeated to tide over times of difficulty. 
Several investigations have shown that the average income of these traders 
is 10s. per week. This represents a total annual income of £4,949. The 
result is very gratifying to the traders themselves, and represents a very 
distinct contribution to the income of the blind of Scotland. 

It is an interesting fact that 86 blind persons are known to us in Scot- 
land as following various branches of the musical profession. Inquiries 
I have made bring out that nearly all who have been trained for music 
are able to maintain themselves, while there are several brilliant successes. 
One result of inquiry I have made also shows that few have lost their posi- 
tion and self-respect, or drifted into the vagrant or mendicant class. I 
have made up a column which includes those who are engaged in what may 
be called "home industries." Very few of these were trained in institu- 
tions, or follow the occupation for which they were trained at their own 
homes. This, however, is not at all usual in Scotland. In one district, the 
making of fishing and lawn tennis nets gives employment to a few; one 
man has a hen farm, another is engaged in breeding pigs, two afe engaged 
in farming, one makes leather tabs for mattresses, another makes iron 
skewers for butchers. A man in Islay engages in lobster fishing, and an- 
other in Glasgow makes a good income by manufacturing clasps and hasps 
from old meat tins. Such employments show an amount of alertness and 
inventiveness that is most praiseworthy, and suggest a field of possibilities 
for those who care to work their minds round the problem of possible em- 
ployments for the blind. The largest number of those whom I have de- 
scribed as "otherwise employed" are women, and are engaged in knitting 
in connection with our different Societies. Wool is supplied and payment 
is made for the knitting, which is done by the women in their own homes. 
£408 was paid last year to 150 knitters for work done, the Ladies' Auxili- 
ary taking the responsibility of disposing of the varied stock of knitted 
goods in their sale shop. 



3*0 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



I have put the 129 who make their living on the streets in a class 
by themselves. They include those who have drifted from institutions and 
other employments, but who took to the streets in the prospect of a free 
and easy way of living. In most cases the influences are entirely demoral- 
izing. Among the best of them a distaste of any steady work is a marked 
feature, and although attempts have been made, we can scarcely point to 
a successful experiment in lifting one from the streets into any regular 
employment. We have known street musicians and readers who preserved 
their respectability and character, but the temptations to indolence and 
dissipation are so great that every effort should be made to prevent such a 
way of living being adopted. 

I will not dwell on the position of the 333 persons who are inmates of 
our poorhouses. I tjhink in all cases where our respectable poor blind 
people are struggling on the margin of utter poverty every effort should 
be made to enable them to preserve their self-respect and maintain their 
little homes. Where the circumstances, however, are not such as to warrant 
outdoor relief from the parish, I am glad there are such shelters as our 
poorhouses. If our institutions could devise and provide some simple form 
of employment that would not require long training they would meet the 
case of many middle-aged men who can at present scarcely be kept out of 
the poorhouse. The proportion of our outdoor blind who need temporal 
assistance is very large. Scotland is not favored, as England is, with Pen- 
sion Funds for the Blind. Our Societies have the machinery, but not the 
means, to deal with this matter of pensions, though they have no lack of 
suitable cases. In various forms of benevolence £2,500 was given by our 
Societies in Scotland directly to the blind, and we know of at least an 
equal amount that reaches them from other charities. I would here plead 
for a Pension Fund for the Blind of Scotland, speaking as I do in the capi- 
tal of the land. 

W. H. Tate, Bradford: — At the time of the Royal Commission of 
1889, upwards of 8,000 blind persons, above the age of 21, were in receipt 
of relief from the guardians, of whom no less than 3,278 were resident in 
workhouses or workhouse infirmaries. There are many blind persons whose 
physical strength or mental endowment is below the average, as a result 
of the causes which have produced blindness, but who are nevertheless 
capable of learning a trade and of doing something towards earning their 
living. Though fairly industrious, regular and attentive to their employ- 
ment, however, they are such slow workers that they can never earn the 
whole sum necessary for their maintenance. For such persons to receive 
a little systematic "necessary relief," as a supplement to their wages, would 
seem to be a reasonable and desirable arrangement. On the main issue 
that many of the blind, even if they are energetic, can never support them- 
selves by their earnings, I suppose we are agreed. If that be so, some 
one must, and I suppose actually does, supplement, or there would be partial 
starvation. 

Dr. A. W. G. Banger, London: — The appalling fact to which I first 
wish to draw your attention is that there is a very serious proportion of 
the blind now spending their lives, and, as far as they know, the remainder 
of their lives, in the workhouse. My own feeling is that there is an obliga- 
tion upon the various Christian churches of this land to clear the unions 
of all the blind that are in them. 

Mr. H. Stainsby, Birmingham: — I never look to find out what the turn- 
over of an institution is, but what the blind are getting out of it. When 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 381 



I turn to the Dundee report I am met by the striking fact that the blind 
workers of Dundee get over £2,000 a year from the trading department. 
The school department, it is true, is small. I am delighted to know that 
there are vacancies in the school. I said to one of the ladies who was 
walking round with me, k 'I wish your school were empty," and she said, 
"So do I." Unfortunately, in some parts our schools are congested. I 
am delighted to know that in Dundee you have places waiting for these 
little children. Mr. Macdonald told me to-day that one of the most inter- 
esting parts of the work here was the work among the little children. We 
cannot go into the school-rooms without being always affected by their 
blindness. It is a sad thing to think that these little children must be in 
darkness for ihe whole of their lives, that they are past cure, and that all 
that medical skill can do for them has been unavailing. It rests with us, 
Christian philanthropists, to do our level best to make their lives happy 
and to give them the opportunity of becoming self-supporting. 

Mr. Pine, Nottingham: — It has been clearly shown that the industrial 
side of the work for the blind in Scotland is greater than it is in England. 
The most important question at this conference has been the employment 
of the blind. We have been shown what can be done for the employment 
of the blind at Dundee, and I think we have had great examples put before 
us wherever we have gone in visiting these Scottish Institutions. 

Mr. G. S. Wilson, Indianapolis: — I think I can safely say that in the 
United States we have students who will compare very favorably in the 
way of literature and music, but we are behind in the industrial features. 

Mr. J. P. Kruger, Cape Colony: — I have been very much impressed 
by finding so many ladies and gentlemen who give their time and patience 
to the work of the blind. It is the same in South Africa. I find it is uphill 
work all over the world. 

Miss M. Field, Oldham: — I should like to mention two employments 
which have not been spoken of this morning ; one is tab rug-making and 
the other the manufacture of string bags. The latter has been a great 
success. The apparatus is quite simple and easy to manipulate. The girl 
who makes string bags came to me straight from school, and on an average 
she has earned 5s. a week, and the last few weeks it has been 8s. I pay 
her 5d. for each bag and sell it for Is. The girls are not boarded but they 
are given a dinner every day. 

Mr. Colin Macdonald, Dundee: — We have come to the end of a most 
interesting discussion on a most important subject, but we have not come 
to the end of the subject itself. I have the honor of moving the following 
resolution:- — "That the problem of the better employment of the blind is 
of such vital importance and consequence that a National Committee be 
appointed to consider the questions raised in the paper this morning and 
the subsequent discussion; the selection of the Committee be left to the 
Conference Committee." 

Mr. H. W. P. Pine, Nottingham: — I should like to be allowed to sec- 
ond this resolution. I think the better employment of the blind is the 
most burning question we have before us at the present time. The educa- 
tion of the blind is now well assured. What we most require now is op- 
portunities of thorough technical training for them, to be followed by 
greatly increased facilities for their employment. If we can do something 
to ensure that the employment of the blind shall be put upon a better foot- 
ing, then we may rejoice that this Conference has not been held in vain. 



382 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



IN THE UNITED STATES. 

It is generally admitted that Great Britain and several countries of 
Europe are in advance of America with regard to the industrial education 
of the blind, and in provision for the adult blind. But that branch of the 
work is beginning to attract more attention in the United States. In my 
Report for 1905 I gave a summary of the findings and recommendations of 
the special committee appointed by the New York Legislature to investi- 
gate the condition of the adult blind of that State and to report on the 
expediency of establishing industrial training schools or other institutions. 
A Conference of the American Association of Workers for the Blind was 
held at Saginaw, Michigan, in August, 1905, from the report of which the 
following extracts are taken : — 

Charles H. Jones: — Regarding blindness, both blind and seeing peo- 
ple are coming to understand, that blindness of itself is no valid excuse 
for idleness or pauperism. Blind children are being taught that, their 
parents, friends and the state expect them to develop into useful, self-re- 
specting, independent men and women; that by the great law of compensa- 
tion, the lack or loss of one sense may be largely met by the increased de- 
velopment of the others. 

Progressive steps, marking as they do an ever-advancing Christian 
civilization, led thoughtful people to consider the condition and needs of 
the adult blind. As the result of this consideration and investigation it 
was discovered that many who had spent from six to twelve years at some 
school for the blind, while possessing a good literary education, and with 
minds cultured and broadened by the opportunities they had enjoyed, were 
still unable to utilize any of their accomplishments to the extent of ob- 
taining a livelihood, and without home or friends were compelled to take 
refuge in an almshouse or to become mendicants upon the streets. Further 
investigation discovered another fact, of which the public is still to a very 
large extent profoundly ignorant, that of the blind people in any state a 
very large proportion (some estimate at least two-thirds) lose their sight 
either by accident or disease after they are nineteen years of age, or be- 
yond the age limit in most states for entering the ordinary schools for the 
blind; and, even could they enter, such a curriculum as these schools pre- 
sent would not be what is needed by these people, many of whom have 
families depending upon them. Conditions like these, when properly un- 
derstood by an enlightened public, will not long be allowed to continue. 

Every pupil graduated from schools for the blind should be proficient 
in one or more useful industries, as well as in the literary work to which 
attention has been given. 

While the number of occupations open to the blind is necessarily lim- 
ited, still from time to time new ones appear, and without doubt as people 
become interested in the subject and the blind themselves demand oppor- 
tunities, many hitherto unthought of avenues to usefulness and profit will 
be opened. 

Of the children attending schools for the blind, as of those attending 
schools for the seeing, only a small proportion will ever be able to obtain their 
living by what we call a profession. By far the larger number, if self-sup- 
porting wholly or in part, must become so through the use of their hands. 

Schools for the training of the adult blind should be established in 
every State; not to supersede the schools for blind children already estab- 
lished, but to supplement them. They should open a door of hope to those 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 383 



who lose their sight after passing the ordinary school age, by affording 
them an opportunity at the expense of the State to learn some branch of 
industry by means of which they may become once more independent. They 
should also receive such pupils from the schools for blind children as, 
having pursued their regular course of study, are evidently not calculated 
to succeed in a professional life, but need an industrial training to prepare 
them for future independence and usefulness. 

Connecticut occupies the proud position of being the pioneer State 
to provide by legislative enactment for the instruction of her adult blind. 
Michigan has followed her example, and the day is not far distant when 
provision for the adult blind will be made by every State. 

0. H. Burritt : — Three-fourths of a century ago there were only three 
institutions in the United States for the education of the blind. To-day 
there are in the United States and Canada over forty such institutions. 

According to the last report of the American Printing House for the 
Blind, at Louisville, Ky., there were registered in 1883 in the schools for 
the blind then in existence in the United States 2,442 pupils, while in 
1905, 4,422 pupils were receiving instruction in the forty-one schools in 
this country. Moreover, in 1883 probably every institution then in existence 
had enrolled among its so-called pupils a very large percentage of the adult 
blind who were there, either in order to be provided a home — whence the 
still quite generally prevalent notion that an institution of any kind for 
the education and training of the blind is an asylum, and that our schools 
for the blind are charitable institutions rather than an essential part of 
our public school system — or to become proficient in some trade or profes- 
sion supposed to be available for blind people. To-day, with very few and 
notable exceptions, these schools enrol only pupils of school age, i.e., boys 
and girls between the ages of five and twenty-one years. 

There are only ten States in the Union that have not provided some 
kind of institution for the education of the blind. Only about one-tenth 
of the blind of the United States are of school age. The Commission found 
that in the State of New York only 9.72 per cent, are of school age, that 
is, under twenty-one years. 

Mr. Allen: — A kind-hearted superintendent in Philadelphia once 
started a home department, which soon preponderated. Then came a good 
working home for blind men ; a home for women was also established ; the 
home for men has a waiting list ; married men live outside ; the men are 
paid more than they earn ; such an institution cannot be self-supporting. 
Thank God ! Philadelphia does not pension the blind, and I do not think 
the self-respecting blind wish it. 

Oscar Kuestermann : — After the Legislature of Wisconsin, during its 
1903 session, had wisely provided for a workshop in which the adult blind 
of our State were given a chance to become self-supporting and to earn 
their own livelihood, the question arose what branch of industry, what 
trade would bring the best results. Broom-making was not considered, 
because the competition in this line was too great and margins cut down to 
a minimum. Mattress making was thought of, but when it was ascertained 
that machinery is now largely employed in this line, and prices materially • 
reduced in consequence, we came to the conclusion that this idea would 
also have to be abandoned. Chair caning was not considered a trade. 
Looking over the reports of foreign institutions for the blind, we found 
that of all the lines in which the blind were employed, none promised bet- 
ter results than the manufacture of willow ware. When our shop was 



384 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



opened in December, 1903, we started with four apprentices, and since then 
have had thirty-nine blind men on our pay-roll. A few of them left soon 
after entering, because idleness or the following of some other occupa- 
tion was given the preference. The great majority of our workmen re- 
mained, are happy and contented, and glad of the chance to earn their own 
living and to enjoy the blessings of work. On entering the workshop the 
first work taught our men is the making of doll buggies. This enables them 
to learn the setting up of willows, the fitching of reed and the different 
closings of the rims, all work which is the foundation of basket making. 
The first day of work on the buggies varies according to the skill of the 
men, some succeeding in making four to five buggies a day, while others, 
less apt, make from one to two. The amount allowed for each buggy is 
two cents net. In this way the first week's earnings vary from 30 to 60 
cents. In the course of one or two months the men are able to make ten 
to twenty buggies a day, their earnings being from $1.20 to $2.40 a week. 
After becoming experienced in the making of doll buggies our men are put 
to work on plain baskets, an employment which is more remunerative. In 
course of time their work includes clothes baskets, hampers, office baskets 
and all kinds of specialties. All of our workmen are taught from the begin- 
ning that all work must be well made. 

A statutory provision recently enacted authorizes the State Board of 
Control to furnish indigent blind artizans, who are not residents of the 
city of Milwaukee, board and lodging for a reasonable time, and also pro- 
vide means of transportation from any point within the State of Wiscon- 
sin, so as to enable them to learn a trade and become self-supporting, such 
allowance not to exceed in any one case the sum of $75.00. 

The average weekly earnings of all our men for the first six months 
was $2.32; for the next six months, $3.73, and for the last six months, 
$4.20. The weekly average of six of our best workers is $6.12, and the 
highest amount earned in one week by any one in our shop was $10.30. 
The earnings of the men consist of the difference between the cost of mater- 
ial and the selling price of the finished product. The State of Wisconsin 
simply furnishes the necessary manufacturing room, salesroom, warehouse, 
fuel, tools, and pays the wages of the superintendent and instructors. While 
up to the present time only men have been employed, it is our intention 
to find out some occupation for the blind women of our State, the last Leg- 
islature having appropriated the necessary funds for this purpose. 

Mr. Kuestermann thinks the lazy man would not work in a home where 
maintenance is given free ; in a workshop a man who does not work does 
not earn, and he- will soon find out that it is either work or go to the poor 
house, if he has no other means. Women could not succeed as willow 
workers. 

Charles F. F. Campbell:— It is a significant fact that of the 65,000 
blind persons in the United States less than 5,000 are attending schools. 
This small attendance results in part from the non-enforcement of the com- 
pulsory education laws and to a much greater extent to the fact that of 
the 65,000 over 75 per cent, are adults and have become blind long after 
school age. Of this large group of adults nearly half are over sixty years 
of age. For the aged blind, little can be done except to brighten their 
lives. For the group of unemployed able-bodied blind people between the 
ages of twenty and about fifty, little has been done of a practical nature 
in the Uniied States, as compared to the work in Europe. On the other 
side of the Atlantic, work shops for the blind are quite as numerous as 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, 385 



schools. In this country Industrial Institutes are needed where those who 
are unqualified to benefit by the training in the schools for the blind and 
those who lose their sight beyond school age may be taught some trade. It 
is arbitrary and unprogressive to say that sewing, knitting, chair caning, 
broom, basket and mattress making are the only industrial lines of work 
open to the blind. The vital question is, what remunerative occupations 
are available for them? For the women, modern hand weaving deserves 
thorough testing. Another shop industry is the manufacture of a patent 
broom for cleaning the switches of street car tracks, and mops. It is folly 
to attempt to cast all the workers in the same mould. When enough pupils 
have learned a given trade they should be assisted to start a small work- 
shop on a business basis in some city near their homes. 

C. S. McGiffin : — The Indiana Industrial Home for Blind Men is a 
private enterprise, located in Indianapolis. It is only a workshop where 
blind men are employed at making brooms. This institution was organized 
and incorporated in 1899. The funds with which our factory is operated 
are secured by subscriptions. Some of our men earn as much as $7.00 or 
over a week, while others can earn scarcely $4.00 a week. Our pay rolls 
show an average earning of about $5.10 for each man a week. The most 
of our workmen have learned a trade at the State School for the Blind, 
during their youth, but are not competent to operate their own factory, 
and, like the majority of men with sight, they prefer working for others. 
But there is another class of unfortunates, who are perhaps more needy in 
many instances than those whom we are now employing. I mean those 
who have lost their sight since becoming of age and are not admitted into 
our state schools for blind children. We are constantly receiving many 
requests from both married and single men, ranging in age from about 25 
to 50, and over, who have lost their sight mostly by accident, and who are 
unable to maintain themselves while learning a trade. For the benefit of 
this class, we have twice placed a bill before our State Legislature. This 
bill provided for the maintenance of not to exceed 20 ad nit blind men, at 
anj- one time, at the rate of four dollars per week for each, and only for a 
period of two years. In 1903 this bill was vetoed by the Governor. It was 
introduced again, but was fought desperately by the labor organizations 
and failed for a second time. 

Esther J. Giffin : — At the Edinburgh Conference an especially valuable 
feature was an exhibition of work done by the blind, contributed by 27 
institutions. The industrial work was well done, and the institutions give 
employment to hundreds of sightless persons, but most of it is done at a 
loss. 

Charities and the Commons: — Dr. Howe, the great pioneer in work 
for the American blind, clearly saw that there were two problems in help- 
ing the blind — the one distinctly scholastic and the other industrial. 
To-day we still have in the mattress shop, started by Dr. Howe, one of the 
best examples of a successful industry for the blind. Unfortunately, the 
general public, blinded by their wonder at the fact that the blind can even 
be taught to read and write, failed to uphold the early superintendents in 
their efforts to satisfactorily solve the industrial problem. As a result the 
line of least resistance was followed, and to-day we have 4,500 children 
being educated and very few men or women over twenty years of age re- 
ceiving trade training. This state of affairs has, largely as a result of the 
cry of the blind themselves, become more and more clearly recognized, 
culminating in the appointment of such commissions as have recently 

25 ED. 



386 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 




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1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 387 



served in New York and Massachusetts. The literature of the movement 
is not, as yet, large. A first step is a demand for facts — to find out who 
the blind are, their age, the age when they became blind. These investi- 
gations are showing that the same needs which characterize different classes 
of the seeing — the vigorous, the thriftless, the industrious, the anaemic, 
are to be found among them; and that from the standpoint of the com- 
munity the significant fact is not lack of sight — which in an intellectual 
and aesthetic sense can be largely overcome by the methods of the schools — 
but their insulation as members of economic society. Therefore comes a 
demand that the scholastic institutions dealing with blind youths prepare 
them more concretely for after life. The third step is a demand that agencies 
be devised to train industrially those who become blind after maturity — 
not, in most cases, as permanent industrial backwater groups where the in- 
efficient may be cared for because of their sightlessness — but as way stations 
through which the trained blind may gain a footing in the community life 
of their generation. It will be seen, therefore, that to the general public 
one of the most urgent appeals is for a new attitude toward the blind. That 
attitude can best be stated in these words of a superintendent of one of 
the most progressive American institutions in this field : 

Everyone realizes the blessing of sight to such an extent that he is 
scarcely able to think rationally of blindness. 

We who are surrounded by the blind do not fail to realize some of the 
terrible consequences of the affliction ; we never become hardened to the 
condition, but, as physicians do, direct our sympathy into channels that 
are practical. 

My interest in the adult blind is neither sentimental nor pathological, 
but simply sociological. I might tell you of old men and women in pitiable 
plight, but they are often over eighty years old, and would be nearly as 
badly off with their sight ; again of a graduate of a school for the blind who 
may have been afforded the utmost advantages the school can give and yet 
be unable to support himself, but he is likely to be diseased in body or per- 
verted in mind or to have defects of character which would make his suc- 
cess impossible if he had the best of sight. I am not ready to generalize 
or to give an answer to the problem until I know all the elements of it. It 
is like a question in proportion in many terms, the distress of individuals 
being but one term. I have great fear of movements started by those whose 
eyes are too full of tears for perfect vision or whose hearts are so large as 
to take all the blood which belongs to both the heart and head. 

Helen Keller : —Opportunity to work is what we ask, not charity. We 
know from experience that the blind can be made self-supporting. To 
assist the blind to attain self-competence not only endows them with happi- 
ness, but relieves the State of the burden of their idleness. Contrast the 
beggar at the street corner with the self-supporting, self-respecting blind 
citizen, and ask if the transformation from one to the other is not a gain 
to you and to me as well as a veritable re-creation for him. 

The current report of the New York State Board of Charities Com- 
mittee on the Blind states that " the experience of the two schools of the 
blind in this State has been that those who make the best use of the schol- 
astic years are best fitted on graduation to enter into ordinary business 
competitions and activities, hence the greatest stress is laid on thorough 
scholastic training; and although the schools find it necessary to furnish a 
certain amount of industrial drill and trade instruction, this branch of the 
school work is regarded as of secondary importance.' ' 



388 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The committee's report states elsewhere that the "industrial or trade 
instruction is left largely for the years between twenty-one and thirty, when 
it usually becomes the major interest. In the institutions the occupations 
are limited, and even when the blind become expert, do not afford large 
enough returns to satisfy reasonable desires." 

Dr. F. Park Lewis: — For every blind man placed upon his feet and 
made independent and self-sustaining, the gain to the state is enormous. 
He becomes an object lesson, an inspiration to those similarly afflicted, a 
help and an encouragement to the disheartened and hopeless. The blind 
man who, while still well and strong, becomes a pauper, is not only a bur- 
den upon the charitable, but a pernicious element in the community in 
that he unconsciously influences the weak and the lazy to beg, when they 
should work, to lean, when they should stand upright. 

While among the blind there are always a few who, by reason of 
natural gifts or unusual opportunities, will succeed without outside help, 
the large majority are merely average men and women. When blindness 
comes suddenly the man is at first stunned, then confused, then appalled 
by the apparent hopelessness of his position. He had always depended 
upon his eyes to guide his every movement ; and when he finds that sight 
is gone, there comes a sense of utter helplessness. His usual movements are 
imperfectly co-ordinated and his attitude and gait take on an exaggerated 
awkwardness. In the manual laborer, the brain action is not usually rapid. 
The routine muscular movements under the guidance of the eyes have be- 
come largely automatic. When one element of the associated functions is 
taken away the movement of all becomes hesitant and uncertain. Then 
rapidly follows loss of self-confidence. The man can no longer do the 
simple things that he had all his life done, although sight is not required 
to do them. He cannot walk freely and rapidly on an unobstructed sur- 
face, although he is assured that he may do so without danger. He must 
be readjusted to the altered position in the world in which he finds him- 
self. It is the critical period in his new life. He must be taught to be- 
lieve in himself. He must find himself. 

There is a tide in the affairs of blind men which must be taken at the 
flood. After blindness becomes an established fact in the adult every month 
in which he is allowed to remain an aimless sit-by-the-fire makes more diffi- 
cult his ultimate reclamation. It is at this exact time that friendly inter- 
vention is most readily accepted and is most useful. He must be shown 
that blindness and helplessness are by no means synonyms. He has 
never before this been interested in blind people. He has never dreamed 
of a blind man working with his hands or with his brain, or both, 
at some remunerative employment. He has yet to learn that men who can- 
not see can yet make beautiful willow baskets that bring good round prices 
and that blind women can and do weave exquisite fabrics fit for household 
use. He is at the crossing of the ways, but he is not going to remain there 
indefinitely. One road leads to activity, to potential, if not actual, happi- 
ness — to occupation, man's mental, moral and physical salvation — the other 
leads to apathy, mendicancy, loss of self-respect, often loss of character. 
Which road he will take after a comparatively short period of hesitation 
will depend partly on the man himself, largely on the inspiration given 
him from outside. He must have his belief in himself re-established. He 
must be shown what the blind can do, what he can do — how he can do it. 
All of this new knowledge must be brought to him and he must be made 
to feel that the world has a place for him which he must be fitted to fill. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 389 



But, for this, training is necessary. The old habits must give place to 
new' ones. The old trade, that of a stonemason, perhaps, or of a carpenter, 
must be exchanged for the new one for which eyes are not so necessary^— 
that of a broom maker or of a chair caner. Here, unfortunately, at this 
critical point in his career, he turns to us in vain. We have schools for 
the young blind, but for the man or woman to whom this frightful afflic- 
tion has come — up to the present time no adequate provision has been made. 

The immediate need is the industrial school. The blind man is facing 
a new life. He is as unfitted as a child to meet it alone. He must be taught 
to use his hands and his head in a new way. He must be inspired by being 
brought in touch with other blind workers who have succeeded. His apti- 
tudes must be studied and the work for which he is best suited chosen for 
him. Then he must be encouraged, set to work, taught the trade in which 
he is most likely to succeed. Shop schools should be established in various 
centres of population. They should be maintained by the state and should 
be work schools simply. They should be under one general and uniform 
supervision. These should not be allowed to become homes, and only 
those should be admitted to their benefits who are mentally and physically 
capable of profiting by a limited course of instruction. Many of the blind 
require charitable aid, but this should be administered through other 
channels. 

Charles F. F. Campbell: — The purpose of every school for the blind, 
while equipping its pupils for the life they are to lead, ought also to aim 
definitely to make its graduates self-supporting. If the present system is 
not accomplishing this, it is high time the matter should be discussed. 
More should not be expected of the blind child than is expected of the 
seeing. Most blind children come from that class from which is recruited 
the vast army of industrial workers. It is unreasonable to try to make 
professionals out of those who, had they sight, would become artizans or 
laborers. One of the reasons why workshops for the blind have not paid 
has been that charity, correction, education and business have been hope- 
lessly mixed. There ought to be fifty lines of industry open to the blind, 
instead of less than ten. Homes for the able-bodied under fifty years of 
age seem to be inexcusable. No person should be sent to the poor house 
because he is blind, but, on the other hand, blindness should not keep 
him from where, under similar circumstances, he would be if sighted. 

Lucy Wright: — 'The blind need more instead of less education than 
the seeing, and adults becoming blind need immediate encouragement to 
work. Otherwise they fall into idleness, ill-health and even danger, and 
the feeling that blindness makes questionable occupations legitimate con- 
tinues to grow. 

E. P. Morf ord : — First, there is a class who are capable of supporting 
themselves without the aid of any organized effort in their behalf. Second, 
there is a class who are capable of self-support if started with the aid of 
organized effort. Third, there is a class who, although they strive earnest- 
ly, are not capable of supporting themselves without organized effort. 
Fourth, there is a class who, with or without organized effort, will not try 
to support themselves, but rather expect their support to come in some way 
from the public. The Industrial Home for the Blind of Brooklyn has taken 
hold of this problem in a practical way by establishing under its roof work- 
shops for blind mechanics, with a home or boarding house attached. The 
home is not self-supporting and is dependent upon the contributions of per- 
sons who are interested in its welfare. It does not receive city or state aid. 



390 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The inmates are expected to pay $2.75 per week for their maintenance. Idlers 
are not wanted. About 35 per cent, of the workmen are married and live 
in their own little homes with their families. 

J. P. Hamilton: — The Lansing school tried at first to meet this de- 
mand (for industrial instruction of adults), but these endeavors, which at 
best only could benefit a few of the many who needed such aid, so im- 
perilled the usefulness of the school as a moral and intellectual educational 
institution for the youthful blind and also resulted in such financial loss, 
that these efforts to assist the older blind were entirely discontinued. The 
problem of how best to care for and help the adult blind has not been 
solved. The work is new and necessarily in more or less of an experimental 
stage. There are many pursuits which blind people can follow, but very 
few which can be followed with enough rapidity to make them practical 
as life work. To illustrate : Blind girls are perfectly capable of doing the 
best kind of work with ordinary knitting machines such as are used in all 
knitting factories, but they work so slowly that they cannot make wages 
enough to keep themselves. 

C. F. F. Campbell: — All over the world can be found workshops for 
the blind. If it was only possible to find some article requiring a large 
amount of hand work which could be patented and held exclusively for 
the blind, our problem would be solved. 

A WORKING HOME FOE THE BLIND. 

Mrs. C. E. Miller, in Leslie's Weekly, 29th March, 1906. 

One of the serious problems confronting philanthropy is the care of 
the indigent blind. The best system along this line yet devised seems to 
be the one adopted by the State of Pennsylvania, which not only provides 
food and shelter for these unfortunates, but also some employment to divert 
their minds from their affliction, to keep them from becoming street beg- 
gars for the benefit of others, and to enable them to earn enough to be 
practically self-supporting. The Pennsylvania Working Home for Blind 
Men was the first, and is still the largest, of its kind in the United States. 
The home is situated on Lancaster Avenue, in West Philadelphia, and con- 
sists of three substantial buildings — the superintendent's cottage, a large 
house where the men who have no families may board, and a four-story 
factory, 212x90 feet. The property, which is enclosed in a spacious yard, 
is valued at |283,000. As broom making seems to be the best possible em- 
ployment for the blind, the principal part of the factory is given over to 
this industry. 

While it is impossible for a blind man to complete a broom, he is able 
to do three-fourths of the work — more in this than in any! other trade. 
Experience has shown that nearly every blind man, no matter how un- 
skilled, can learn to size broom-corn — that is, he can sit at a machine which 
has a number of raised measure marks and a knife worked by a treadle. 
With this he prepares stalks for five different sizes of brooms, and places 
each one in its proper rack. This work is usually done with great rapidity 
and fingers are rarely cut. Ninety per cent, of the men can sew a broom, 
and about fifty per cent, can learn to wind. The latter seems to be the 
most difficult for sightless eyes, yet there is a man at the home who is 
deaf, dumb and blind, and who winds a broom perfectly. He selects the 
proper length of corn from the boxes at the side, twists the wire around the 



J906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 391 



handle, hammers in the tacks, and finally with a sharp knife trims the 
edges. ' This man, who is now about thirty-two years old, has been in the 
home for eight years, and his wages average five dollars per week. When 
communication with him is necessary, it is done by writing with one's fin- 
ger on the palm of his hand, which he understands readily. He is ap- 
parently happy and contented, works steadily, and has saved some money. 
One of the "sizers" is also totally deaf, and so keen is his sense of feeling 
that the men frequently write with their fingers on his back or arms the 
words they wish to speak. At one of the tables an interesting blind youth 
stems the corn, selecting the rough pieces for the inside of the brooms. 
This young man is also a fine musician, and spends many evenings at the 
piano in the home, much to the delight of the less educated. 

One hundred and nineteen blind men are working at present, and, 
with the assistance of twenty-five who can see, they have in the last two 
years manufactured more than a million brooms and received in wages 
about |56,000. An average week's work amounts to about $7, although 
some have earned $15. Four hundred tons of Illinois broom-corn is used 
each year, and while the principal market is in New York and Boston, a 
large consignment was recently shipped to Dublin, Ireland. The brooms 
manufactured are of good quality and retail from forty to fifty cents each. 
No imperfect goods are put on the market, as the men are taught that the 
laws of the business world are stern, and that the merchant who to-day 
signs a cheque as a donation to the institution which shelters them would 
to-morrow refuse to buy their product if the workmanship was inferior. 

The scenes in the factory are little different from those of any other. 
The men laugh, sing, and tell jokes. They know the sound of each other's 
footsteps — especially that of Mr. Geo. W. Hunt, the superintendent, who 
joins in their pleasures and comforts them in sorrow. A number of the 
men have families and reside near by, while many who learned the trade 
at the factory are working for themselves in different cities. Carpet looms, 
where rag carpets are woven, are also operated by blind men. Hags for 
this purpose are frequently sewed at different institutions, and the Working 
Home for the Blind receives twenty-five and thirty-five cents a yard for 
furnishing chain and weaving the carpet. Chairs are also re-caned at 
prices ranging from sixty cents to three dollars and a half, according to 
the style. 

Life at the Home is simple and comfortable. The men pay $2.25 per 
week for board, washing and mending. The sleeping rooms are large and 
airy, and a general bath room is provided, as the superintendent insists 
upon cleanliness. The food is plain, but wholesome, and several waitresses 
are on hand at meal time to cut the meat, butter the bread, and see that 
every man is properly cared for. All churches and nationalities are repre- 
sented, but, regardless of creed, the men assemble in the little room known 
as the chapel each evening after supper, where a chapter from the Bible is 
read to them by Mr. Hunt. Some of the men have good voices, and often 
hymns are sung with the piano accompaniment of the blind bov who stems 
corn in the factory. The latter part of the evening is spent in conversa- 
tion or in the library, where a number of raised letter books are to be 
found. 

The labor of the institution is, of course, not as rapid in execution as 
the labor engaged in the industrial world, and, its product being compara- 
tively small in quantity, does not yield sufficient for its proper support. 
It is not surprising, therefore, that the Blind Working Home does not pay. 



3y2 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



and that the deficit must be made up by private donation and a State ap- 
propriation. But it is almost a sacrilege to view such work from a commer- 
cial standpoint, for the profit does not lie in the dollars and cents that go 
into the pockets of the workmen, or into the treasury of the institution, 
but finds its expression in the joy and comfort which are ministered to 
those poor unfortunates. To the donors it has its reward in the conscious- 
ness that the burden of affliction has been lifted, that speech has found a 
substitute for use by the dumb, and that light has been let into the souls 
of the physically blind. 

LIBRARIES. 

The Teachers' Library contains books of reference, poetry, biography, 
history, fiction, etc., which are used by the teachers in preparation for the 
work of their classes, and from which readings are given by the teachers 
to the pupils every evening. These books are printed in the common black 
type. 

In the circulating library are 280 books in Moon type and 100 books 
in New York point print. Subscribers to the circulating library have access 
to the Pupils' Library, which contains over 1,000 books in line letter and 
1,000 in New York point. These books are loaned to applicants, who can 
furnish proper recommendations, free of charge, and they are carried to 
and from the institution free of postage. 

The total enrolment of subscribers to the circulating library is 127; 
the number of readers during the year ended September 30th was 49 ; new 
readers enrolled during the year 13; number of books issued 227. The 
number of books loaned since the library was established is 1,576. 

The following books have been procured for the Teachers' Library : — 

America, Travels in North, Hugh Murray, 2 vols. 

Bible in India, Jacolliet. 

Bubbles, by An Old Man. 

Caesar's Commentaries, translation and notes. 

Charles and Marie, de Souza. 

Comedies and Proverbs, Piotevin. 

English Constitution, DeLolme. 

English Prose, 4 vols. 

Mrs. Falchion, Gilbert Parker. 

Hebrew Commonwealth, John Jahn. 

History, Lectures on Modern, Wm. Smyth, 2 vols. 

Homer's Iliad, Pope's translation. 

Inventions, History of, John Beckman, 2 vols. 

Jeune Aveugle, Montolieu. 

Lectures and Essays, Sir Stafford Northcote. 

Mirror, the Edinburgh, 3 vols. 

Moral Sentiments, and Origin of Languages, Adam -Smith. 

Poems, Lady Flora Hastings. 

Poetical Quotations, Dictionary of, Sarah J. Hale. 

Poets, British, Chaucer to Burns. 

Political Cyclopaedia, 4 vols. 

Puritan Nomenclature, C. W. Bardsley. 

School-room Rhymes, John Given. 

Scripture Lands, Kitto. 

Shakespeare, Age of, Seccombe and Allen, 2 vols. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 893 



Shakespeare, Readings from. 

Shakespeare's Works, with notes, Carruthers and Chambers, 10 vols. 

Woman's Work and Woman's Culture, Josephine E. Butler. 

World, the, Adam Fitz-Adam, 4 vols. 

Bible Encyclopaedia, 3 vols. 

Cooper's Novels. 

George Eliot's Novels. 

Miss Alcott's Works. 

Life of Brant. 

Great Englishmen. 

Modern Banquet Orator. 

Gospel Hymns. 

Tackabury's Atlas. 

The following in point print have been purchased for the Pupils' and 
Circulating Libraries: — 

Robinson Crusoe, 2 vols. 

King of the Golden River, Ruskin. 

Captain January, Laura Richards. 

The Dav's Work, 2 vols., Kipling. 

Twelfth Night, Rolfe's Notes. 

Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, 2 vols. 

The Virginian, 3 vols. 

Selected Stories, Aldrich, 2 vols. 

The Oregon Trail, 2 vols. 

Handbook of Modern Japan, 2 vols. 

That Preston Girl. 

THE STAFF 

Minister of Education (in charge) : 
Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D. 

Deputy Minister : 
A. H. U. Colquhoun. 

Officers of the Institution : 

H. F. Gardiner, M.A Principal. 

W. B. Wickens Assistant Principal. 

W. N. Hossie Bursar . 

J. A. Marquis, M.D Physician. 

B. C. Bell, M.D Oculist. 

Miss A . M. Rice Matron. 

Teachers : 

W . B. Wickens Literary. 

P. J. Roney do . 

Miss C. Giliin do . 

Miss M. E. Walsh do. 

Ernest A. Humphries Music. 

Miss E. Moore do. 

Miss E. Harrington do. 

Miss E . Lee Kindergarten and Domestic Science. 

Miss L. H. Haycock Knitting and Crochet. 

Miss E. Loveys Sewing and Netting. 

Miss K. Burke Assistant Knitting and Sewing. 

T. S. Usher Piano Tuning. 



394 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



George A. Ramsay Supervisor of Boys. 

Miss M. J. Cronk Visitors' Attendant. 

Mrs. J. Kirk Boys' Nurse. 

Miss M. Stewart Girls' Nurse. 

J. B. Wilson Engineer 

G. G. Lambden Carpenter. 

G. Grierson Baker. 

D. Willits Farmer and Gardener. 

FARM, GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 

The outside woodwork of the western half of the main building was 
painted during the summer, and the barn and stables and workshop were 
also painted. New outside doors were provided for the workshop and west- 
ern entrances to the main building. Hardwood floors were laid in the 
kitchen hall, boys' lavatory and one of the music rooms. Two of the doors 
were enlarged to facilitate the moving of the pianos. The usual amount of 
painting, oiling and kalsomining was done inside. 

A new implement shed was erected, and the small tool house was re- 
moved. A covering of wood and tar paper was put around the cement silo 
to exclude frost. A handsome verandah was added to the Principal's resi- 
dence. An ice-house is under construction. Owing to pressure of work 
in the Public Works Department it was not found possible to undertake the 
change in the heating system, for which an appropriation was made by the 
Legislature. A new lavatory was equipped in connection with the hospi- 
tal, and several pipe drains were taken up and relaid. The flat roof of the 
bell tower was thoroughly repaired, and missing and broken slates were 
replaced where needed. Considerable work was done upon the eavetroughs 
and conductor pipes. 

Outside, one of the most important improvements was the installation 
of seven electric arc lights for lighting the grounds, which were formerly 
not only dark but dangerous. The spruce trees bordering the centre walk 
and the grove near the Brant Avenue entrance have been trimmed, thus 
greatly improving their appearance and allowing light and air to circulate. 
The centre walk from St. Paul's Avenue to the farm crossing and a portion 
of the walk on the hill were rebuilt in cement, and cement steps were con- 
structed at the west end door. Twenty-five elm trees were planted on St. 
Paul's Avenue, but there is little encouragement to continue work in that 
line, since the civic authorities permit the mutilation # of beautiful trees 
to make room for trolley poles and feed wires. The boys' walk from the 
farm crossing to the top of the hill was taken up and laid with new scant- 
ling, the grade being improved. 

The abundant rain in the fore part of the season ensured good crops 
of wheat, oats, corn, potatoes, and roots; the garden vegetables turned out 
well; the apples, though not of the best quality, are abundant. 

VISITORS. 

Many visitors from various parts of Canada, and not a few from the 
United States, are shown through the class rooms and any other portions 
of the buildings they care to see. From their expressions of opinion, they 
seem to be well satisfied with the work the Institution is doing, and will 
say a good word for the school when opportunity arises. They are made 
welcome from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays Wednesdays, Thurs- 
days and Fridays, but not on Saturdays or Sundays. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 395 



While the parents and other relatives of the pupils are at liberty to 
come at any time, it is proper to remind them that they cannot be lodged 
in the Institution. 

H. F. Gardiner, 

Principal. 
Brantford, October, 1906. 

PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., Minister of Education for Ontario: 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit my annual report as Physician to 
the Ontario Institution for the Blind. 

The past year has been an uneventful one, in that with very few ex- 
ceptions the officials and pupils have been singularly free from serious 
illness. The pupils have not only kept free from disease, but have in many 
cases been greatly improved in general health and appearance. This fact 
speaks well for the diet and general regulation of the Institution, with its 
regular hours for retiring, meals, work, recreation, etc. 

There has been a noticeable improvement in the physique of many of 
the boys particularly, during the past year. This is due to the work of 
Mr. George Ramsay, who has charge of the physical training classes. The 
interest taken in games has been quite remarkable and certainly must tend 
to better the physical and mental tones of those who become interested. 
Some such special supervision among the girls would, I think, be followed 
by good results. 

During the early part of the past session we had a few cases of whoop- 
ing cough. 

During the summer there have been improved plumbing conveniences 
added to the Isolation ward, situated over the workshop. This makes it 
fairly complete, and contagious diseases can now be well handled without 
taking the patients from the grounds. 

I have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

J. A. Marquis. 
Brantford, Sept. 1st, 1906. 

OCULIST'S REPORT. 

To Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.B., Minister of Education: 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit my report as Oculist to the Ontario 
Institution for the Blind. 

On March 29th and 30th I examined as follows : — 

Males Females Total 

New pupils 13 9 22 

Pupils re-admitted after an absence 3 4 7 

Old pupils 12 12 24 

Total examined 53 



396 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



There was no question as to the eligibility of any of the pupils just 
entering, but one old pupil, from whom I removed a degenerated eye which 
had been a menace to its fellow, I reported, might safely continue his edu- 
cation at a public school, as there was no longer any danger to his good eye. 

The usual number of pupils blind from infancy, but delaying attend- 
ance at the Institution until anywhere up to the age of twenty, are in 
evidence. It seems impossible to impress the parents of many of these 
children with the importance of beginning their proper education early in 
life. I must add, though, that the Principal deserves credit for the im- 
provement he is bringing about in this respect. 

A number of acute eye and ear troubles required my attention during 
the year, but in nearly all the cases the pupils recovered their former con- 
dition. There was an agreeable absence of contagious eye troubles, not 
one having been brought to my notice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. C. Bell. 
Brantford, Sept. 4th, 1906. 

LITERARY EXAMINER'S REPORT. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., Minister of Education: 

Sir,- — In submitting the report of my examination of the literary de- 
partment in the Ontario Institution for the Education of the Blind, there 
is very little of a general nature to state. 

In the Kindergarten work the classes are large enough to engage the 
attention of more than one teacher. Miss Lee does exceedingly good work, 
and in an ordinary school she would find the class small enough, but in 
this Institution the conditions are so different that an assistant would be 
most valuable. We find here children very young and in the same class 
an occasional pupil fifteen or sixteen years of age. This may be accounted 
for in part by the fact that parents from natural affection towards a child, 
especially one with some defect, are reluctant to let such a one leave home 
until they realize that something must be done for their offspring. Thus 
a child of fifteen or sixteen must begin with one of seven or eight. If 
parents knew the nature of the training at this Institution, they might 
be induced to part with their children earlier in life. 

Again, we find boys or girls of foreign extraction. Sometimes these 
are very quick to learn, but they require special attention. In this class, 
among those of French origin there is one boy who last October knew no 
English, but, for all that, passed a very creditable examination in English 
Reading, so good an examination in fact that he was allowed full marks. 

One little fellow was present with his left hand and left side par- 
tially paralyzed. It was impossible for him to trace the letters in read- 
ing, without a guiding hand. 

From such instances one may gather that progress must be slow, and 
that the services of an assistant Kindergarten teacher would prove very 
valuable. 

The change in spelling book, recommended in my last report, has been 
adopted, and an authorized Canadian edition is now used. 

The recommendation in my last report, in reference to Latin, also 
has been acted on, and though the ground covered is not extensive, yet a 
very promising beginning has been made. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 397 



A detailed statement of the work of the various classes during the 
four days' examination, held from June 12th to 15th, inclusive, will be 
found in the following: — 

Mr. Wickens' Classes. 

Arithmetic. — Simple questions in fractions. This class consists of 
seven boys and nine girls with great variety of ability. Three of the pupils 
obtained perfect marks, the percentage of the class ranging from to 100 
with an average of 63. 

Geography. — British Empire. In this class of eight boys and fifteen 
girls the answers generally were good and showed careful study, though 
some were poor, the marks ranging from IT to 100 per cent., and averaging 
76. 

Reading. — This is the senior class and consists of six boys and ten 
girls. The book of selections is in point print. The marks assigned were 
from 50 per cent, to 85, with an average of 67. The pupils were examined 
in a piece of several lines, and afterward, to show that they had not mem- 
orized the work, detached lines were selected for them to read, and they 
stood the test very creditably. 

Latin. — First conjugation; first and second declensions, nouns and 
adjectives. Though the ground covered is not very extensive, the work has 
been done thoroughly and the results are highly satisfactory. The class 
of six boys and twelve girls answered with great readiness and accuracy, 
all but two obtaining full marks. 

Bible Geography and History. — The period covered is from the end of 
the Old Testament to the beginning of the New Testament. This class 
consists entirely of boys, twenty in number. High marks were obtained, 
from 50 per cent, to 100, the average being 84. 

Spelling. — There are four divisions in this class, composed entirely 
of boys, consisting respectively of nine, eight, five and four pupils. The 
marks assigned to these four divisions were respectively 78, 83, 77 and 81 
per cent., being an average of about 80. 

Mr. Roney's Classes. 

Arithmetic. — Subtraction, multiplication to 12 times 20; easy prob- 
lems. In this class there are three divisions containing seventeen pupils 
(nine boys and eight girls) with great variety of ability, the marks vary- 
ing from 25 per cent, to 100, with an average of 76. This junior class has 
much good material. 

English Grammar. — Parts of speech and the analysis of simple sen- 
tences. There are twelve boys and nine girls in the class, and with the 
exception of two the pupils have a grasp of the work. Some of the class are 
exceedingly bright. The marks assigned were from to 100 per cent., 
averaging 74. 

Geography. — Canada, particularly Ontario. Map and book work of 
the Public School Geography. This is a junior class of nine boys and four 
girls. The answers indicated excellent work, two pupils obtaining full 
marks. The pupils were graded in marking from 67 per cent, to 100, with 
an average of 85. 



398 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Beading. — Embossed Readers, I., II., III. This class of eight boys 
and eight girls has several good readers, as is indicated by the marks from 
40 to 95 per cent., with an average of 75. 

Writing. — This is a senior class of eleven boys and twelve girls, and 
the results are very creditable. The importance of writing cannot be too 
strongly emphasized. The pupils obtained in marking from 35 to 95 per 
cent., making an average of 75 per cent. 

Miss Walsh's Classes. 

Arithmetic. — Fractions, measurements of rooms, carpeting, general 
problems. This is a senior class of six boys and ten girls, and some of the 
pupils are very quick in calculation. Several took full marks, the range 
being from 10 per cent, to 100, giving an average of 73 per cent. 

English Grammar. — The work for this intermediate class consists of 
definitions, the indicative mood and the parsing of simple sentences, and 
the ground has been well covered. The marks were from 35 per cent, to 
100, with an average of 78 in a class of five boys and ten girls. 

Geography. — This junior class of fifteen boys and eleven girls have 
had for their work definitions, Ontario, physical features, railways, pro- 
ducts, New Ontario, provinces with capitals, etc. The pupils are greatly 
assisted by the use of the dissected map, which tends to make the study 
of geography more practical. It certainly adds interest to this very im- 
portant subject. The marks varied from 38 to 100 per cent., the average 
being 78 per cent. 

Heading. — There are two divisions in this class, the senior, consisting 
of two boys and four girls in the Third Reader; the junior, one boy and 
three girls in the Second Reader. As the class is small more individual 
attention is given to the pupils — a distinct advantage, as is shown by the 
high marks received from 60 to 100 per cent, with an average of 90. 

Writing. — In this class of six boys and ten girls the work consists in 
writing single words, with the use of small letters, though some try capi- 
tals. The marks varied from 20 per cent, to 80, with an average of 45 
per cent. 

Object Lessons. — A very interesting half -hour was spent with this 
class of young pupils, seventeen boys and twenty- two girls. The attention 
in this large class was exceedingly good and they manifested much ability 
in describing the manufacture of carpets, pianos and other articles. By 
the use of stuffed birds and four-footed animals they were able to give a 
description of the Eider Duck, Horned Owl, Wild Turkey, Ferret and 
others. The answers on the whole were very creditable, especially consid- 
ering the size of the class. 

Bible History. — First six chapters of St. John; parables and miracles 
from Matthew, Luke and Acts. This class is composed of four boys and 
twelve girls, all Roman Catholics. The marks ranged from 50 per cent, 
to 100, with an average of 87 per cent. 

Spelling. — This class of nine Roman Catholic girls showed excellent 
results in the work of spelling, as found in twenty pages of Gage's Speller, 
all but one obtaining full marks. Here again the small number in the 
class admits of more personal teaching. 



1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 399 



Miss Gillin's Classes. 

Arithmetic. — Multiplication tables to twenty times twenty; weights and 
measures; simple rules and problems. In a class of eight boys and eight 
girls the marks ranged from 27 per cent, to 98, with an average of 66 per 
cent. 

English Grammar. — This is a senior class of three boys and eight 
girls, most of whom showed good preparation in work which comprised the 
history of the language, a review of definitions, with false syntax, parsing 
and analysis. The marks assigned were from 40 per cent, to 96, averaging 
75 per cent. 

Geography. — The work in this subject has been thoroughly done, em- 
bracing the United States and South America in detail, and outlines of 
Mexico, Central America and the West Indies. In a class of three boys 
and nine girls, four obtained full marks, the rest from 67 per cent, to 92, 
the average of the class being 86 per cent. 

Writing. — The work consists of letters and simple words with pencil 
and grooved card. There are eight boys and ten girls in this class of 
juniors. The marks varied from 5 per cent, to 80, with an average of 37 
per cent. 

English History. — Twenty-four chapters of Justin McCarthy's "His- 
tory of Our Own Time." This class of ten boys and twelve girls showed 
marked proficiency and careful training as indicated by the very high aver- 
age in marks of 93 per cent. 

Canadian History.— From the Treaty of Paris, 1763, to the end of 
the War of 1812-14. The pupils in this class are the same as in English 
History and have done highly creditable work, receiving marks from 34 
per cent, to 100, with an average of 87 per cent. 

Bible Geography and History. — The class of eighteen girls passed a 
very creditable examination of the portion studied, embracing four hundred 
years between the Old Testament and the New Testament. All did well, 
the marks averaging 97 per cent. 

Spelling. — Gage's Practical Speller, Part I., thirty-three sections; 
Part V., eight sections. This class of twenty girls acquitted themselves 
well, taking from 50 per cent, to 100, with an average of 87 per cent. 

English Literature. — The pupils in this subject are excellent students 
and eminently successful. They have evidently done their work thoroughly, 
difficult though it has been, including the history of American literature 
from 1620 to 1861 ; names and locations of Canadian Universities, as well 
as Shakespeare's play "Hamlet." The pupils without exception (eight 
boys and eighteen girls) showed an appreciation of the various characters 
portrayed in this tragedy and passed a highly creditable examination, the 
average marks being 94 per cent. 

Some type-written samples of English composition were submitted for 
examination, both the compositions and the type-writing being the work of 
the pupils. Both the subject matter and the mechanical work were 
excellent. 

Miss Lee's Classes. 

In the Kindergarten class we found an interesting family of thirteen 
boys and six girls engaged in picture sewing, mat weaving, paper folding, 
cutting and pasting, bead stringing, leather lacing, raffia, gift lessons with 
blocks, making models in clay, etc. 



400 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



The children are taught to memorize poetry, some of which they recited 
very well indeed, showing careful training. 

The class room is furnished with a piano which is used to accompany 
the scholars in their musical exercises. Under the guidance of Miss Lee 
at the piano, the children sang several selections with the sweet effect that 
only children can produce. 

The pupils were examined in the following literary subjects: — 

Arithmetic. — Counting by odd and even numbers, addition from one 
to thirteen, subtraction, multiplication to five times, examples. In this 
class there are three divisions. The marks assigned were from 50 per cent, 
to 100, with an average of 87 per cent. 

Reading.- — There are several divisions in this class of fourteen boys 
and six girls, some of them remarkably bright. For example, a boy of 
French origin knew no English last October, but is now one of the best 
readers in the room. Some require assistance in guiding their hands while 
tracing the letters, but the majority have overcome that difficulty. The 
marks assigned varied from 40 per cent: to 100, the average being 76 per 
cent. 

Bible Geography and History. — This class of eleven boys* and five girls 
answered exceedingly well the questions on their work that included the 
names of the books in the Bible classified, the Apostle's Creed, Lord's 
Prayer, Ten Commandments, the Beatitudes, Psalms, I., XIX., XXIII., 
CXYII. The average mark was 98 per cent. 

Spelling. — Steps in the Phonic System, words of three letters, mixed 
words, names of familiar objects. Thirteen boys and six girls compose this 
interesting class. Average, 98 per cent. 

Miss Haycock's Classes. 

Bible Geography and History. — This is a bright class of fifteen girls. 
The answers were excellent, oil work including Exodus, Leviticus and Num- 
bers in outline. The marks ranged from 50 per cent, to 100, with an aver- 
age of 93 per cent. 

Spelling. — The work in this class consists of the first twenty-three 
pages of Gage's Speller, and words pronounced alike with different mean- 
ings. In this room there are seventeen girls, most of whom did very well, 
the marks ranging from 34 per cent, to 100, with an average of 80 per cent. 

^ Miscellaneous. 

In addition to these subjects which belong to the literary department 
proper, there are other branches that occupy the attention of many of the 
pupils, and, as I was requested to inspect the work, a brief report is here 
appended. 

Under the direction of Miss Haycock, assisted by Miss Burke, forty-one 
girls receive instruction in knitting and crochet work, and great credit is 
due to both the instructress and the instructed for the fine samples of their 
skill. 

In Domestic Science, Miss Lee has a class of six girls whom she in- 
structs in the care of the kitchen, setting the table, cooking, dish-washing, 
dusting, and other branches of ordinary housekeeping. 

In the sewing room a class of twenty receive useful lessons in sewing 
and some in netting from Miss Loveys, assisted by Miss Burke. 






1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 401 



In bead-work, Miss Cronk teaches a class of twenty-two boys, with 
excellent results, and Miss Hepburn (a pupil teacher) takes charge of twenty- 
nine girls very successfully. 

The work in physical culture is under the direction of Mr. Roney and 
Mr. Ramsay, the former having a class of fifty-three girls, arranged in three 
divisions. A class of fifteen girls gave an exhibition in club-swinging, 
bar bells and marching, showing careful training. The boys, to the num- 
ber of twenty, showed to advantage in dumb bell exercises and marching, 
the evolutions being marked by vigor and precision. Both Mr. Roney 
and Mr. Ramsay have produced good results in their classes. 

A most important branch remains to be mentioned, where a class of 
21 boys may be found busily occupied in the workshop. Here instruction 
is given by a person who for a generation or more has proved most faithful in 
the discharge of the duties devolving on him — that is Mr. George Lambden. 
The rooms are kept remarkably clean and in excellent order. Some of the 
boys are taught the uses of willow and cane for chairs and other articles, 
while others are engaged in making hammocks and similar goods, for which 
there is a fairly remunerative market. Although the pupils enter heartily 
into the work and apparently enjoy it, yet, if a small percentage were al- 
lowed them of the proceeds from the sale of goods made by them, it would 
be an incentive to greater activity. This suggestion may be worthy of 
consideration on the part of the Minister of Education. 

In conclusion, I would acknowledge the courtesy shown me by Prin- 
cipal Gardiner, the faculty and other officers of the institution, which served 
to make enjoyable the otherwise somewhat arduous duties of examiner. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. F. Passmore.. 

REPORT ON MUSICAL INSTRUCTION. 

Hon. R. A. Pyne, M.D., Minister of Education: 

Sir, — I beg to submit the result of my examination of the Musical 
Instruction given at the Ontario Institution for the Blind, Brantford. 

The examination was held on the 30th and 31st of May, 1906, and 
conducted under the following heads: — Piano, Organ, Theory of Music 
(Harmony, Counterpoint and Musical History), Singing and "Vocal Class. 
Some work of the members of the graduating class in piano tuning was 
also heard. Sixty pupils have been studying music during the last year, 
of whom fif tv-nine took up the piano, nine the organ, two singing and nine- 
teen musical theory. With the exception of two, each one was heard by 
me separately. As in former years, several of the students availed them- 
selves of the local examinations of the Toronto College of Music. Thirteen 
presented themselves this year and passed the examinations; the results 
are incorporated in this report. 

The Piano course of the 0. I. B. has pupils in every stage of develop- 
ment, from beginners to graduates. One finds, of course, among so many, 
talents in varying degrees, but it is pleasant to note that, while the more 

26 ED. 



402 THE REPORT OF THE No. 12 



gifted pupils are being well taught, the others, with less talent, are by 
no means neglected — all being carefully grounded in the essentials of touch, 
technique and musical expression. 

The grades are from I. to IV., each with subdivisions A, B, and C. 
In Grade I. there are 28 pupils — 16 in Class A, 6 in Class B, and 6 in 
Class C. Of the sixteen pupils in Class A (the lowest) two may be singled 
out from the others as being very promising, five as being somewhat less 
so, and eight who only do fairly well. One was not heard. Of these latter, 
four are adults who are taking a little piano work in connection with tuning. 
In Class B there are six pupils; three are fairly bright and are doing well; 
the others are slower. Of the six pupils in Class C, two are capable, two 
are fair, one is very slow; the last was not heard. 

In grade II. there are nine pupils — four in Class A, three in Class B t 
and two in Class C. Of the four pupils in Class A, two are doing very well 
and the other two fairly well. Of the pupils in Class B, one is good and 
two are fair. Both of the pupils in Class C are doing well; one of them 
passed with first-class honors the first examination of the Toronto College 
of Music and the other gives much promise. 

In the third grade are twelve pupils; seven in Class A, three in Class 
B, and two in Class C. Three of the pupils in Class A passed the first 
examination of the Toronto College of Music with first-class honors, and 
one of these three must be noted as being exceptionally promising; another 
passed the same examination with honors, and another obtained pass stand- 
ing; the other two pupils in Class A do fair work. Of the three pupils in 
Class B, one passed with honors the Toronto College of Music first exam- 
ination; the other two are doing fairly well. One of the two pupils in 
Class C passed the Toronto College of Music second examination; the other 
does fair work. 

In grade IV. are nine pupils ; two in Class A, five in Class B, and two 
in Class C. The two pupils in Class A passed the second examination of 
the Toronto College of Music, one with honors. Of the five pupils in Class 
B, one has passed with first-class honors the Toronto College of Music third 
examination; three play fairly well; the other has a weak technique. Of 
the two pupils in Class C, one of them, Miss Mary Macdonald, was this 
year awarded the Piano Diploma of the College of Music; the playing of 
the other is fair. 

The single pupil in grade V. (the highest), Miss Hester Ponting, has, 
with Miss Macdonald, obtained the Piano Diploma of the Toronto College 
of Music. Without being exceptionally brilliant, these young ladies are 
good players, and during the last few years have been conscientious stu- 
dents. Their reward is well merited. 

The pupils in the Organ class are divided into grades II., III. and IV. 
In grade II. are two pupils, neither of whom could appear. In grade III. 
there are six pupils. Of these, three are playing quite well, one particu- 
larly so; the other three are fair. The one pupil in grade IV. played some 
French music in a brilliant manner. 

The pupils in Musical Theory (under Miss Moore) are divided into 
three classes, A, B, and C. Of the ten pupils in Classes A and B, nine of 
them passed the First or Second Theory examinations of the Toronto Col- 
lege of Music. The four pupils in Class A, who are doing advanced work, 
all passed the second examination of the College, working papers in written 
and practical harmony, counterpoint and musical history. Three of these 
pup ill did remarkably good work in counterpoint and history, obtaining 80 

2fia ED. 






1906 EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



per cent, and more of the marks, and standing near the head of the list 
among this year's successful candidates of the Toronto College of Music. 
Of the six pupils in Class B, five passed the first theory examination of the 
Toronto College of Music, three of them scoring high percentages. The 
junior pupils of Class C worked papers set for them in harmony and his- 
tory. The average mark obtained in Harmony was 64 per cent., and in 
History 36 per cent. The lower average in this class, when set against 
the more satisfactory showings of the diploma candidates, would seem to 
indicate the stimulus exerted by examinations. 

Two pupils were examined in singing this year. Neither could give 
evidence of any training, although each is the possessor of a fair voice. 
It would be to the advantage of the O.I.B. if more attention were given to 
solo singing. 

The choral class again demonstrated how much enjoyment the students 
derive from part-singing. Four part songs by modern composers were 
nicely sung, showing that much pains had been bestowed by Mr. Humphries 
in keeping up the standard of this part of the Institution's work. 

At the morning devotional exercises, the hymns were heartily sung to 
the accompaniment of the organ, which was capably played by one of the 
organ pupils. 

Mr. Usher, the Instructor in Piano Tuning, is maintaining the good 
work of his predecessors. Nineteen of the students are at various stages in 
the tuning course. The work of two or three of the most advanced was. 
seen and found to be excellent. 

The teaching of Mr. tt. A. Humphries, the Musical Director, and of 
his assistants, Miss Moore and Miss Harrington, as seen in the performances 
of their pupils, reflects much credit upon them. The standard is well main- 
tained, and seems likely to be continued; and there is a spirit of hearty 
emulation among the students which one is pleased to see. 

I have the honor to be, 

Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

W. E. Fairclougii. 

Toronto, August 29th, 1906. 



404 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



ONTARIO INSTITUTION FOR THE BLIND. 



Statistics for the Year ending 30th September, 1906. 
I. Attendance. 



Attendance for portion of year ending 30th September, 1872. 

" for year ending 30th September, 1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906 



Male. 


Female. 


Total. 


20 


14 


34 


44 


24 


68 


66 


46 


112 


89 


50 


139 


84 


64 


148 


76 


72 


148 


91 


84 


175 


100 


100 


200 


105 


93 


198 


103 


98 


201 


94 


73 


167 


88 


72 


160 


71 


69 


140 


86 


74 


160 


93 


71 


164 


93 


62 


155 


94 


62 


156 


99 


58 


167 


95 


69 


164 


91 


67 


158 


85 


70 


155 


90 


64 


154 


84 


66 


160 


82 


68 


150 


72 


69 


141 


76 


73 


149 


74 


73 


147 


77 


71 


148 


J i 


67 


144 


72 


66 


138 


68 


70 


138 


67 


64 


131 


68 


66 


134 . 


67 


74 


141 


71 


76 


147 



II. Age of Pupils. 



Five 

Six 

Seven 

Eight 

Nine 

Ten 

Eleven 

Twelve 

Thirteen 

Fourteen 

Fifteen 

Sixteen 



years 



No. 



1 

2 

4 

3 

8 

9 

10 

7 

11 

1() 

14 

9 



years . 



Seventeen 

Eighteen 

Nineteen 

Twenty 

Twenty-one 

Twenty-two 

Twenty-three 

Twenty- four 

Twenty-five 

Over twenty-five years 

Total 



No. 



4 
8 
8 
6 
6 
3 
5 
3 
2 
14 

147 



190G 



EDUCATION DEPARTMENT. 



405 



III. Nationality of Parents. 





No. 

2 
74 

29 

16 

1 

1 




No. 






American 


German 


5 


Canadian 


Hungarian 


1 


English 


Russian 


1 


Irish . . 


Scotch 

Unknown 


16 


Italian 


1 


Galician 


Total 






147 









IV. Denomination of Parents. 



Congregational 

Baptist 

Disciples 

Episcopalian 

Methodist 

Evangelical Association 
Presbvterian 




No. 



Roman Catholic 
Salvationist .... 

Lutheran 

Jewish 

Greek Catholic 

Total 



26 
3 
2 

2 
1 

147 



V. Occupation of Parents. 



No. 



Agents 

Barber 

Bartender 

Bricklayers 

Blacksm ith 

Butcher 

Captain 

Carpenters 

Carter 

Clerk 

Civil Engineer 

Contractors 

Cooper 

Cook 

Carriage-builder . . . 

Cabinetmaker 

Conductor 

Drover 

Electrician 

Farmers 

Firemen 

Foreman 

Gardeners 

Government officers 

Gentleman 

Grocer 

Hostler 

Hotel-keeper 



2 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
40 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Laborers 

Lawyer 

Machinists 

Manufacturer 

Merchants 

Millwright 

Miner 

Painter 

Polisher 

Plumber 

Policeman 

Plasterers 

Printer 

Railway Employes. 

Repairer 

Shoemakers 

Tanner 

Tailors 

Teacher 

Teamsters 

Telegraph Operator 

Traveller 

Warehouseman . . . 

Weaver 

Unknowm 



Total. 



No. 



32 
1 
2 
1 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2' 
1 
4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 

147 



406 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



VI. 



-Cities and counties from which pupils were received during the official year ending 

30th September, 1906. 



County or city. 




6 

s 

to 


13 

H 


County or city . 


a3 

13 


q3 
15 

a 

to 


3 

H 


District of Algoma 


3 


1 


4 


County of Norfolk . 




4 

1 

2 

2 

.... 
3 


4 


City of Belleville . 


Northumberland . . . 
Ontario . . 


2 
] 
2 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 


3 


Countv of Brant 


1 
2 
1 


"2 

2 


1 
4 
3 


1 


City of Brantford 


City of Ottawa 


4 


Countv of Bruce 


County of Oxford . . 


3 


1 ' Carleton . . 


District of Parry Sound 

County of Peel . . 


1 


" Duffenn 








1 


Dundas 








" Perth . 


2 


Durham 








Peterborough 

Prince Edward 

" Prescott 


4 


" Elgin 


2 


"3' 


2 
3 


1 


Essex 


2 


Frontenac 




Renfrew. . 




i ' Glengarrv 


1 


1 

1 
1 
1 


2 
1 
1 

2 


" Russell 




2 

1 


2 


" Grenville 


District of Rainy River 




1 


Grey 




City of St. Catharines . . 






City of Guelph 


1 


' ' St. Thomas 








Countv of Haldimand 


" Stratford 


1 
2 


2 


3 


ui»* " Haliburton 








County of Simcoe 


1 3 


" Halton 








Stormont 






City of Hamilton 


1 


3 


4 


City of Toronto 


13 
2 

4 


15 

.... 

1 
1 
3 
2 
.... 

1 

"i' 

3 

76 


28 


Countv of Hastings. . . 


County of Victoria . 


2 


■Dm " Huron 

City of Kingston 

County of Kent 


2 
1 
2 
5 

2 


1 

"2 
2 

"l 


3 
1 
4 

7 
2 
1 


Waterloo 


5 


Welland 


1 


" Wellington 




1 


Lambton 

Leeds 


Wentworth 

Citv of Windsor. . . 


1 
1 
2 
1 


4 
3 


' ' Lanark 


' ' W T oodstock 


2 


' " Lennox 


County of York 


2 


r ~"" ' ' Lincoln 








^Province of Alberta 


1 


City of London 








^British Columbia 


1 

2 

2 

71 


1 


County of Middlesex . . 




4 


4 


^Manitoba . . . 


3 


District of Muskoka 




"^Saskatchewan 


5 


District of Nipissing 


2 


3 


5 


Total 


147 



"On Pavments. 



VII. — Cities and counties from which pupils were received from the opening of the Institution 

till 30th September, 1906. 



County or city. 



District of Algoma . 

City of Belleville . . . 

County of Brant . . . 

City of Brantford . . 

County of Bruce . . . 

Carleton . 

" Dufferin . 

" Dundas . . 

" Durham . 

Elgin 

Essex . . . 
Frontenac 
Glengarry 
Grenville 
Grev.... 





6 










3 


c3 

a 

to 


3 



5 


4 


9 


3 


1 


4 


8 


7 


15 


16 


10 


26 


9 


11 


20 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


3 


3 


3 


6 


4 


4 


8 


7 


6 


13 


11 


20 


31 


5 


2 


7 


8 


1 


9 


2 


2 


4 


9 


12 


21 



County or city. 



City of Guelph 

County of Norfolk 

" Northumberland 

' ' Ontario 

City of Ottawa 

County of Oxford